8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "king" - 601 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
King name
"Creusa"
Greek 1. A daughter of Oceåñuś and Ge. She was a Naid, and became by Peneius the mother of Hypseus, king of the Lapithae, and of Stilbe. 2. A daughter of Erechtheus and Praxithea, was married to Xuthus, by whom she became the mother of Achaeus and Ion. Greek
King name
"Coronis"
Greek 1. A daughter of Phlegyas and mother of Asclepius. 2. A daughter of Phoroneus, king of Phocis; she was metamorphosed by Athena into a crow, for when she was pursued by Poseidon, she implored the protection of Athena. Greek
King name
"Evadne"
Greek 1. A daughter of Poseidon and Pitane. Immediately after her birth, she was carried to the Arcadian king Aepytus, who brought her up. She afterwards became by Apollo the mother of Iamus. 2. A daughter of Iphis, or Philax. (Apollodorus iii) There are three other mythical personages of the same name. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
King name
"Philomela"
Greek 1. A daughter of king Pandion in Attica, who, being dishonoured by her brother-in-law Tereus, was metamorphosed into a nightingale or swallow.
King name
"Thoas"
Greek 1. A son of Andraemon and Gorge, was king of Calydor and Pleuron, in Aetolia, and went with forty ships against Troy.
King name
"Coronus"
Greek 1. A son of Apollo by Chrysorthe, father of Corax and Lamedon, and king of Sicyon. 2. A son of Thersander, grandson of Sisyphus, and founder of Coroneia. 3. A son of Caeneus, was a prince of the Lapithae, and father of Leonteus and Lyside. He was slain by Heracles. (Apollodorus. ii) 4. The father of the Argonaut Caeneus. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) Greek
King name
"Polydorus"
Greek 1. A son of Cadmus and Harmonia, was king of Thebes, and husband of Nycteis, by whom he became the father of Labdacus. (Theogony of Hesiod 978 ; Apollodorus iii)
King name
"Oebalus"
Greek 1. A son of Cynortes, and husband of Gorgophone, by whom he became the father of Tyndareus, Peirene, and Arene, was king of Sparta. According to others he was a son of Perieres and a grandson of Cynortas, and was married to the nymph Bateia, by whom he had several children (Apollodorus iii). The patronymic Oebalides is not only applied to his descendants, but to the Spartans generally, and hence it occurs as an epithet or surname of Hyacinthus, Castor, Pollux and Helena. 2. A son of Telon by a nymph of the stream Sebethus, near Naples. Telon, originally a king of the Teleboans, had come from the island of Taphos to Capreae, in Italy and Oebalus settled in Campania. (The Aeneid Book VII) Greek
King name
"Ilus"
Greek 1. A son of Dardåñuś by Bateia, the daughter of Teucer. Ilus died without issue, and left his kingdom to his brother, Erichthonius. 2. A son of Tros, and grandson of Erichthonius. His mother was Calirrhoe, and being a great-grandson of Dardåñuś, he is called Dardanides.Greek
King name
"Tros"
Greek 1. A son of Erichthonius and Astyoclie, and a grandson of Dardåñuś. He was married to Calirrhoe, by whom he became the father of Ilus, Assaracus and Ganymedes, and was king of Phrygia. The country and people of Troy derived their name from him. He gave up his son Ganymedes to Zeus for a present of horses.
King name
"Clytius"
Greek 1. A son of Laomedon and father of Caletor and Procleia, was one of the Trojan elders. 2. A son of the Oechalian king Eurytus, was one of the Argonauts, and was killed during the expedition by Heracles, or according to others by Aeetes. Greek
King name
"Polycaon"
Greek 1. A son of Lelex, brother of Myles, and husband of Messene, the daughter of Triopas of Argos. He emigrated from Laconia to Messenia, which country he thus called after his wife. He was the first king of Messenia.
King name
"Locrus"
Greek 1. A son of Physcius and grandson of Amphictyon, became by Cabya the father of Locrus, the mythical ancestor of the Ozolian Locrians. According to some the wife of the former Locrus was called Cambyse or Protogeneia. 2. A son of Zeus and Maera, the daughter of the Argive king Proetus arid Antaia. Greek
King name
"Sarpedon"
Greek 1. A son of Zeus by Europa, and a brother of Minos and Rhadamanthys. Being involved in a quarrel with Minos about Miletus, he took refuge with Cilix, whom he åśśisted against the Lycians and afterwards he became king of the Lycians, and Zeus granted him the privilege of living three generations.
God name
"Ancaeus"
Greek 1. A son of the Arjadian Lycurgus and Creophile or Eurynome, and father of Agapenor. He was one of the Argonauts and partook in the Calydonian hunt in which he was killed by the boar. (Apollodorus i. 9.) 2. A son of Poseidon and Astypalaea or Alta, king of the Leleges in Samos, and husband of Samia, the daughter of the river-god Maeander, by whom he became the father of Perilaus, Enodos, Samos, Alitherses, and Parthenope.
King name
"Corythus"
Greek 1. An Italian hero, a son of Jupiter, and husband of Electra, the daughter of Atlas, by whom he became the father of Jasius and Dardåñuś. He is described as king of Tuscia, and as the founder of Corythus. 2. A son of Paris and Oenone. He loved Helena and was beloved by her, and was therefore killed by his own father. Greek
King name
"Oeneus"
Greek 1. One of the sons of Aegyptus. 2. A son of Pandion, and one of the eponymic heroes at Athens. 3. A son of Portheus, brother of Agrius and Melas, and husband of Althaea, by whom he became the father of Tydeus and Meleager, and was thus the grandfather of Diomedes. He was king of Pleuron and Calydon in Aetolia. Greek
King name
"Lycus"
Greek 1. One of the sons of Aegyptus. 2. A son of Poseidon and Celaeno, who was transferred by his father to the islands of the blessed. 3. A son of Hyrieus, and husband of Dirce, one of the mythical kings of Thebes. 4. A tyrant of Thebes, is likewise called by some a son of Poseidon, though Euripides calls him a son of Lycus. Greek
King name
"Mentes"
Greek 1. The leader of tho Cicones in the Trojan war, whose appearance Apollo åśśumed when he went to encourage Hector. 2. A son of Anchialus, king of the Taphians north of Ithaca. He was connected by ties of hospitality with the house of Odysseus. When Athena visited Telemachus, she åśśumed the personal appearance of Mentes. Greek
Ghost name
"Aatxe"
Basque A Basque ghost. He is a cave-dwelling divinity who adopts the form of a young red bull, but sometimes in the shape of a man. At night, more so in stormy weather, he arises from the hollow which is his lair, also known as Euskal Herria. He attacks criminals and other mean people. He also protects people by making them stay home when danger is near.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.