8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "late" - 258 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Posis Das"
Greek sky god. In pre-Hellenic times the consort of the earth mother GAIA. One of the primordial partnership identified in Theogony (Hesiod). He later becomes syncretized with ZEUS....
Demon name
"Pradyumna"
Hindu A son of Krishna and Rukmini who, as a baby, was abducted by the demon Sambara and cast into the sea and swallowed by a fish. The fish was caught and opened and the child was found inside. He was given to a woman in Sambara's house to raise. Narada informed her about the true identity of the child. When Pradyumna grew up, he battled the demon Sambara, defeated him. Pradyumna was later killed in a drunken brawl in his father's court at Dwaraka. Hindu
God name
"Prajapati (lord of creatures)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Primordial being. In the Vedic legends he is described variously as the creator of the world and the creator of heaven and earth. He is an androgynous being who impregnated himself by fusing elements of mind and speech. In later epics he is the guardian deity of the sexual organ. Prajapati is also a name of the god BRAHMA in later Hinduism....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Priapos"
Greco - Roman / Phrygian Fertility god. The son of DIONYSOS and APHRODITE, he was also a guardian of mariners. Priapos was not regarded as a significant deity in Greece until very late times—during the Macedonian period, circa fourth to second century BC—and was only locally popular during the Roman Empire period. He is particularly known from Phrygia and is depicted as a satyr-like creature with pronounced genitals....
God name
"Prthu (broad)"
Hindu / Vedic Creator god. The head of the solar pantheon who introduced Agriculture to the human race and who, in later Hinduism, is identified as an avatara of VIS'NU....
King name
"Pururavas and Urvasi"
Indian An Indian myth similar to that of "Apollo and Daphne." Pururavas is a legendary king who fell in love with Urvasi, a heavenly nymph, who consented to become his wife on certain conditions. These conditions being violated, Urvasi disappeared, and Pururavas, inconsolable, wandered everywhere to find her. Ultimately he succeeded, and they were indissolubly united.
God name
"Purusa"
Hindu / Vedic Primeval creator god. Described as the primordial being from whom the cosmos was formed, possibly the male component of the great mother, MATA. In later Hinduism regarded as an avatara of VIS'NU....
Goddess name
"Pusan (nourisher)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic Sun god. The original Vedic list of six descendants of the goddess ADITI or ADITYAS, all of whom take the role of Sun gods, was, in later times, enlarged to twelve, including Pusan. He is the charioteer of the Sun and a guardian deity of journeys and pathways. Color: golden. Attributes: four lotuses....

"Rhode"
Greek The oldest of the Oceanides and a daughter of Tethys and Oceåñuś. Later, she was thought of as a daughter of Poseidon and Halia, or Poseidon and Amphitrite. Greek
God name
"Rigisamus"
Roman / Celtic / Gallic God of war. Assimilated with MARS....
God name
"Rigisamus or Rigonmetis"
Celtic God of war åśśimilated with the Mars. Celtic
God name
"S e ab"
Egypt Minor god of wine and oil presses. Known from circa 3000 BC until the end of Egyptian history, circa AD 400. In later iconography he is depicted as a lion, but more generally is in human form. Sezmu had a definite cult following in the fertile Faiyum region of the Nile valley, but was probably represented in most sanctuaries, particularly where ritual unguents were made and stored. He is recognized in both benign and malevolent roles. In the latter he is reputed to squeeze human heads like grapes, but in beneficent mood he provides aromatic oils and ointments....
God name
"Sabazios"
Phrygian / northwestern Turkey God. Eventually Hellenized, identified with ZEUS and DIONYSOS and linked with Dionysiac mysteries, appearing in Athens from circa 400 BC. His device is a right hand cast in bronze and decorated with symbols representing his benevolence. His influence extended into Roman culture where he reached a height of popularity circa AD 200. As late as AD 300 there are frescoes of Sabazios in the tomb of Vibia whose husband was a priest of the god's cult....
Nymph name
"Sabazius"
Phrygian A Phrygian divinity, commonly described as a son of Rhea or Cybele ; but in later times he was identified with the mystic Dionysus, who hence is sometimes called Dionysus Sabazius. For the same reason Sabazius is called a son of Zeus by Persephone, and is said to have been reared by a nymph Nyssa.
God name
"Salagrama"
Hindu / late Aniconic form of the god VIS'NU. A fossil ammonite shell embodying the god and forming a part of daily ritual in many Vaisnava households as well as appearing in monasteries....
Goddess name
"Sarama (the nimble one)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Attendant goddess. She acts as a messenger to the god INDRA and guards his herds. In later Hindu texts Sarama is reputedly the mother of all dogs and is given the epithet the “bitch of heaven.” The Rg Veda accounts her as having punished the minor deity Panis for stealing cows....
God name
"Sarapis"
Late Egypt God. Known only from the Greco-Roman period of the early Ptolemies (fourth century BC) but persisting in Europe until second or third century AD. In Egyptian religion Sarapis is a hybridization of certain aspects of OSIRIS, the underworld god, and APIS, the bull god, who symbolizes the earthly presence of PTAH. Sarapis is perceived to epitomize both the fertility of the land and the life of the sacred bull after death. In Greek mythology he takes on aspects of ZEUS, HELIOS, ASKLEPIOS and DIONYSOS. He was worshiped extensively in the Roman Empire period. A sanctuary at York in England was dedicated by a soldier of the sixth legion, and magnificent statues were discovered in the Walbrook Mithraeum in London, and at Merida in Spain. Also Seraphis (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Savitar (impeller)"
Hindu / Puranic Sun god. The original Vedic list of six descendants of the goddess ADITI or ADITYAS, all of whom take the role of Sun gods was, in later times, enlarged to twelve, including Savitar. The god of the rising and setting Sun. Color: golden. Attributes: club, prayer wheel and two lotuses....

"Semele"
Greek A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, at Thebes, and accordingly a sister of Ino, Agave, Autonoe, and Polydorus. She was beloved by Zeus and Hera, stimulated by jealousy, appeared to her in the form of her aged nurse Beroe, and induced her to pray Zeus to visit her in the same splendour and majesty with which he appeared to Hera. Greek
God name
"Shaii"
Hindu / late Astral god and bringer of misfortune. The cult of Shani evolved in about the eighth century AD with the advance of Indian astronomy. He is propitiated frequently to ward off ill-luck and may be depicted sitting on a lotus or riding in a chariot. Attribute: a staff....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.