8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "night" - 164 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Spirit name
"Gaila"
Lithuanian A spirit of night, which obsessed people and animals in dreams. Lithuanian

"Mimas4"
Greek A son of Amycus and Theano, was born in the same night as Paris. He was a companion of Aeneas, and slain by Mezentius. Greek

"Mog Ruith"
Ireland A powerful blind druid of Munster who lived on Valentia Island, County Kerry. He could grow to enormous size, and his breath caused storms and turned men to stone. He wore a hornless bull-hide and a bird mask, and flew in a machine called the roth ramach, the "oared wheel". He had an ox-driven chariot in which night was as bright as day, a star-speckled black shield with a silver rim, and a stone which could turn into a poisonous eel when thrown in water. Ireland
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Oewiros"
Greek A personification of dream, and in the plural of dreams. According to Homer Dreams dwell on the dark spéñïśs of the western Oceåñuś, and the deceitful dreams come through an ivory gate, while the true ones issue from a gate made of horn. Hesiod (Theogony. 212) calls dreams the children of night, and Ovid, who calls them children of Sleep, mentions three of them by name, viz. Morpheus, Icelus or Phobetor, and Phantasus. Euripides called them sons of Gaea, and conceived them as genii with black wings. Greek
Goddess name
"Vestal Virgin"
Greek A nun, a religieuse, properly a maiden dedicated to the service of the goddess Vesta. The duty of these virgins was to keep the fire of the temple always burning, both day and night. They were required to be of spotless chastity. Greek

"Incubus"
Roman A nightmare, anything that weighs heavily on the mind. At one time supposed to consort with women an their sleep. Roman
King name
"Urgan"
s A mortal born and christened, but stolen by the king of the fairies and brought up in elf-land. He was sent to Lord Richard, the husband of Alice Brand, to lay on him the "curse of the sleepless eye" for killing his wife's brother Ethert. When Lord Richard saw the hideous dwarf he crossed himself, but the elf said, "I fear not sign made with a bloody hand." Then forward stepped Alice and made the sign, and the dwarf said if any woman would sign his brow thrice with a cross he should recover his mortal form. Alice signed him thrice, and the elf became "the fairest knight in all Scotland, in whom she recognised her brother Ethert." Scotland
Goddess name
"Hina"
Hawaii A moon goddess and the mother of Maui, whom she once asked to slow down the Sun so days would last longer. A dual goddess, portrayed with two heads symbolizing day and night. She was a guardian of the underworld and patron of artisans and craftsmen. Hawaii
Spirit name
"Bilwis"
Teutonic A maleficent spirit who was active on Walpurgis night and wrought havoc to the crops. Teutonic
God name
"Ina"
Polynesia A lunar deity daughter of Kui or Vaitere, who kept an eel in a jar, but it soon grew into the eel-god, Tuna, who tried to rape her. The people of Upolo rescued her and sentenced him to death. At his request, she buried his head in the sand and from it grew the first coconut. Ina is married to Marama, the god of the night. She lives in the sky during the daytime when her husband is not visible. Polynesia

"Caspar"
German A huntsman who sold himself to Zamiel, the Black Huntsman. The night before the expiration of his lease of life he bargained for three years' respite on condition of bringing Max into the power of the evil one. Zamiel replied, "To-morrow either he or you." On the day appointed for the trial-shot, Caspar places himself in a tree. Max is told by the prince to aim at a dove. The dove flies to the tree where Caspar is concealed. Max shoots at the dove, but kills Caspar, and Zamiel comes to carry off his victim. German
Demon name
"Svyatogor"
Slavic A hero who fought the demon nightingale, a bird-headed human whose weapons were hurricanes. Slavic
God name
"Itzli"
Aztec A god of stone, particularly in the shape of a sacrifical knife. He served Tezcatlipoca as the god of the Second Hour of the night. Aztec

"Maugys"
Britain A giant who keeps a bridge leading to a castle by a riverside, in which a beautiful lady is besieged. Sir Lybius, one of Arthur's knights, does battle with the giant; the contest lasts a whole summer's day, but terminates with the death of the giant and liberation of the lady. Britain

"Puck or Robin Goodfellow"
Britain A fairy and merry wanderer of the night, "rough, knurly-limbed, faun-faced, and shock-pated, a very Shetlander among the gossamer-winged" fairies around him. Britain
Hero name
"Shingebis"
Indian A diver who dared the North wind to single combat. The Indian Boreas rated him for staying in his dominions after he had routed away the flowers, and driven off the sea-gulls and herons. Shingebis laughed at him, and the North wind went at night and tried to blow down his hut and put out his fire. As he could not do this, he defied the diver to come forth and wrestle with him. Shingebis obeyed the summons, and sent the blusterer howling to his home. American Indian

"Kalpa"
India A day and night of Brahma, a period of 4,320,000,000 solar-sidereal years. Some say there are an infinity of Kalpas, others limit the number to thirty. A Great Kalpa is a life of Brahma; the whole duration of time from the creation to the destruction of the world.

"Psyche"
Greek A beautiful maiden beloved by Cupid, who visited her every night, but left her at Sunrise. Cupid bade her never seek to know who he was, but one night curiosity overcame her prudence, and she went to look at him. A drop of hot oil fell on his shoulder, awoke him, and he fled. Psyche next became the slave of Venus, who treated her most cruelly; but ultimately she was married to Cupid, and became immortal. Greek
Goddess name
"Nicevenn"
Roman A Scottish Witch Goddess from the Middle Ages who rides through the night with her followers on Samhain. Her name can be translated as "Divine" or "Brilliant." She is equated with the Roman goddess Diana.
Spirit name
"Stromkarl"
Norwegian A Norwegian musical spirit. The Stromkarl has eleven different musical measures, to ten of which people may dance, but the eleventh belongs to the night-spirit, his host. If anyone plays it, tables and benches, cups and cans, old men and women, blind and lame, babies in their cradles, and the sick in their beds, begin to dance.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.