8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "night" - 164 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼

"Oewiros"
Greek A personification of dream, and in the plural of dreams. According to Homer Dreams dwell on the dark spéñïśs of the western Oceåñuś, and the deceitful dreams come through an ivory gate, while the true ones issue from a gate made of horn. Hesiod (Theogony. 212) calls dreams the children of night, and Ovid, who calls them children of Sleep, mentions three of them by name, viz. Morpheus, Icelus or Phobetor, and Phantasus. Euripides called them sons of Gaea, and conceived them as genii with black wings. Greek

"Mog Ruith"
Ireland A powerful blind druid of Munster who lived on Valentia Island, County Kerry. He could grow to enormous size, and his breath caused storms and turned men to stone. He wore a hornless bull-hide and a bird mask, and flew in a machine called the roth ramach, the "oared wheel". He had an ox-driven chariot in which night was as bright as day, a star-speckled black shield with a silver rim, and a stone which could turn into a poisonous eel when thrown in water. Ireland

"Mimas4"
Greek A son of Amycus and Theano, was born in the same night as Paris. He was a companion of Aeneas, and slain by Mezentius. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Spirit name
"Gaila"
Lithuanian A spirit of night, which obsessed people and animals in dreams. Lithuanian

"Maipe"
Argentina A supreme being åśśociated with the darkness of night, the violent wind of the desert and other dangers. Argentina

"Achlys"
Greek According to some ancient cosmogonies, the eternal night, and the first created being which existed even before chaos. According to Hesiod, she was the personification of misery and sadness, and as such she was represented on the shield of Heracles: pale, emaciated, and weeping, with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long nails on her fingers, bloody cheeks, and her shoulders thickly covered with dust.

"Tartarus"
Greek According to the earliest Greek views, a dark abyss, which lay as far below the surface of the earth as the earth is from the heavens. Above Tartarus were the foundations of the earth and sea. It was surrounded by an iron wall with iron gates set up by Poseidon, and by a trebly thick layer of night, and it served as the prison of the dethroned Cronus, and of the conquered Titans who were guarded by the hecatoncheires, the hundred-armed sons of Uråñuś. Greek
Demon name
"Apep"
Egypt Aka Apepi, Apophis. demon enemy of the Sun this huge serpent caused storms and eclipses and ate the Sun at evening. Rules over: darkness, storm, night, the underworld, death, eclipses. Egypt
Deity name
"Khonsu"
Egypt Aka Chons, Khensu, Khons, Khonsu or Khonshu, is an ancient lunar deity, from before formal structure was given to a pantheon. His name reflects the fact that the moon travels across the night sky, for it means The Wanderer, and also had the titles Embracer, Pathfinder, and Defender, as he was thought to watch over night travelers. Egypt
Angel name
"Granozin"
Celtic Another angel of the 2nd hour of the night, this time serving under Farris.
Supreme god name
"Odin"
Scandinavian Chief god of the Scandinavians. His real name was Sigge, son of Fridulph, but he åśśumed the name of Odin when he left the Tanais, because he had been priest of Odin, supreme god of the Scythians. He became the All-wise by drinking from Mimer's fountain, but purchased the distinction at the cost of one eye. His one eye is the Sun. The father of Odin was Bor. His brothers are Vile and Ve. His wife is Frigga. His sons, Thor and Balder. His mansion is Gladsheim. His seat, Valaskjalf. His court as war-god, Valhalla. His hall, Einherian. His two black ravens are Hugin (thought) and Munin (memory). His steed, Sleipnir. His ships, Skidbladnir and Naglfar. His spear, Gungner, which never fails to hit the mark aimed at. His ring, Draupner, which every ninth night drops eight other rings of equal value. His throne is Hlidskjalf. His wolves, Geri and Freki. He will be ultimately swallowed up by the wolf Fenris or Fenrir. Scandinavian
God name
"Aker"
Egypt Chthonic earth god of påśśage. Known from the Old kingdom (circa 2700 BC onward). Controls the interface between eastern and western horizons of the underworld, and is the guardian of the gate through which the king påśśes into the underworld. Aker provides a safe course for the barque of the Sun god during its påśśage through the underworld at night. He may be seen as the socket holding the boat's mast. He is also considered benevolent against snake bites. Represented by opposite facing pairs of human or lion heads....
God name
"Ikal Ahau"
Mayan / Tzotzil, Mesoamerican / Mexico Chthonic god of death. Perceived as a diminutive figure who lives in a cave by day but wanders at night attacking people and eating raw human flesh. He is also considered to inhabit Christian church towers in Mexico and is probably personified by vampire bats....
Goddess name
"Papatuanuku"
Polynesia Chthonic mother goddess who evolved spontaneously in the cosmic night. Polynesia
Goddess name
"Papatuanuku"
Polynesian / including Maori Chthonic mother goddess. According to tradition she evolved spontaneously in the cosmic night personified by TE PO and became the apotheosis of papa, the earth. In other traditions she was engendered, with the sky god RANGINUI, by a primordial androgynous being, ATEA. Paptuanuku and Ranginui are regarded as the primal parents of the pantheon who, through a prolonged period of intercourse, produced at least ten major deities as their children. In Maori culture Papatuanuku, like all deities, is represented only by inconspicuous, slightly worked stones or pieces of wood and not by the large totems, which are depictions of ancestors....
Goddess name
"Hine-Nui-Te-Po (great woman of the night)"
Polynesian / including Maori Chthonic underworld goddess. Originally she was HINE-ATAUIRA, the daughter of TANE and HINE-AHUONE, but she descended to rule over the underworld. She is depicted in human form but with eyes of jade, hair of seaweed and teeth like those of a predatory fish....
Goddess name
"Klotho"
Greek Clotho or Moirae, Goddess of spinning, one of the three fates. Hesiod (Theogony 127) has the personification complete for he calls them, together with the Keres, daughters of night; and distinguishes three, viz. Clotho, or the spinning fate; Lachesis, or the one who åśśigns to man his fate and Atropos, or the fate that cannot be avoided. Greek

"Alloces"
Greek Commands thirty-six legions. He dresses as a knight and rides a horse. His face is characteristic of a lion, with an inflamed complexion and fervent eyes. He is said to teach astronomy and liberal arts.
Deities name
"Citlalatonac (glowing star)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Creator god. One of the deities collectively clåśśed as the OMETEOTL complex. His consort is CITLALICUE. Between them they created the stars of the night sky....
God name
"Yoalli Ehecatli (night wind)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Creator god. One of the group clåśśed as the Omeotl complex....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.