8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "spirit" - 723 records

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8   ...   37
Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Spirit name
"Gunnodoyak"
A youthful heroic deity who was once mortal Iroquois (North American Indian). He was empowered by the spirit of thunder, Hino, to conquer the Great water Snake, enemy of humankind. The serpent devoured Gunnodoyak but was then slain by Hino, who cut open the snake, recovered the body of Gunnodoyak and returned him to his rightful place in heaven....
Spirit name
"Bmola"
Abenaki bird spirit. Abenaki
Spirit name
"Iatiku and Nautsiti"
Acoma Sisters who, when giving life to the snakes and fishes, accidentally created the evil spirit. Acoma. Native American
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Spirit name
"Tsichtinako"
Acoma Female spirit of the creation myth Acoma
Spirit name
"Koolukoolwani"
Africa It is agreed among the Zoolus, that their forefathers believed in the existence of an overruling spirit, whom they called Villenangi [Umvelinqangi] (literally the First Appearer), and who soon after created another heavenly being of great power, called Koolukoolwani, [Unkulunkulwana,] who once visited this earth, in order to publish the news (as they express it), as also to separate the sexes and colours among mankind. Duling the period he was below, two messages were sent to him from Villenangi, the first conveyed by a cameleon, announcing that men were not to die; the second, by a lizard, with a contrary decision. The lizard, having outrun the slow-paced cameleon, arrived first, and delivered his message before the latter made his apperance. Amazulu, South Africa
Spirit name
"Loa"
Africa spirit beings who were imported by Africa slaves Haiti / Puerto Rico
Deities name
"Mami Wata"
Africa A pantheon of ancient water spirits or deities of the African diaspora.
Spirit name
"Nguruhi"
Africa The all-powerful but remote supreme being and creator who controls the elements and human destiny, but leaves daily occurrences to the influence of the ancestor spirits. The Wahehe, East Africa
Spirit name
"Nommo Dogon"
Africa Primordial spirits who are åśśociated of Rain and fertility Africa(west)
Spirit name
"Olokun"
Africa The patron orisa of the descendants of Africans that were carried away during the Maafa, the Transatlantic Slave Trade or Middle Påśśage. Olokun works closely with Oya, deity of Sudden Change, and Egungun, Collective Ancestral spirits, to herald the way for those that påśś to ancestorship, as it plays a critical role in death (Iku), Life and the transition of human beings and spirits between these two existences.
Spirit name
"Villenangi"
Africa The 'First Appearer'. The supreme spirit, and ancestor god. The Zulu, South Africa
Spirit name
"Abonsam"
Africa / Ghana Malevolent spirit driven away by firing guns and shouting loudly, emptying houses of furniture and beating the interiors with sticks. Gold Coast
Goddess name
"Kamui-fuchi"
Ainu Lady Hearth. A Hearth Goddess who is also known as the Supreme Ancestress and the spirit of female reproductivity and the home. Ainu, Japan
Deities name
"Obosom"
Akan A generic name for the lessor gods, sometimes referred to as the deities. These spirits are embodied in the wind, rivers, oceans, streams, trees, mountains, rocks, animals, and other objects. Akan
Spirit name
"Xhindi"
Albanian Put scissors and broomsticks under your baby's mattress to keep these invisible spirits away. Albanian
Spirit name
"Gitche Manitou"
Algonquin The Great spirit, the Creator of all things and the Giver of Life. Algonquin
Spirit name
"Kiehton"
Algonquin Great spirit and creator. The Algonquin
Spirit name
"Manitou"
Algonquin Manito, Manitu, in traditional Algonquian First Nations culture, is the Great spirit, the Creator of all things and the Giver of Life. "Manitou" is an Algonquin word for "spirit", and "Gitche Manitou" means "Great spirit".
Spirit name
"Nanabush"
Algonquin Creator and good spirit Algonquin
Spirit name
"Nanabush/ Manabozho/ Wisaaka/ Glooscap"
Algonquin The creator & good spirit
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8   ...   37

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.