8 ways to attend college for free
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Wadjet Gog

Wadjet

Her figure was that of a woman’s, and she had a head of a snake, or cobra. It was a typical Egyptian cobra, very poisonous, and deadly. In some situations she was seen as just a cobra, no human figure involved. In this cobra form she was depicted curled up and sitting on a pillar. She was also shown curled around the head of kings and gods. She was even shown with a snake body and an attractive girls head. This was meant to symbolize the alluring tendencies of cobras. Cobras were thought to have a paralyzing gaze; anyone who looked into their eyes would be unable to move. In rare occurrences she was seen with a snake body and two heads. These “conjoined” snakes are seen today, and even now they receive a lot of attention. Wadjet was also seen as the centerpiece on royal crowns and head dresses. Her picture was also on coffins, and earns.




List of Gods : "Serpent goddess" - 14 records

Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Ayida"
Haiti Goddess of Rainbows, especially in Benin and Haiti, Ayida-Weddo aka Aida-Wedo, Aido Quedo, a loa of fertility, Rainbows and snakes, and a companion or wife to Damballah-Wedo. Also Ayida-Weddo is known as the Rainbow serpent. Haiti
Goddess name
"Badb"
Brazil A much feared serpent goddess
Goddess name
"Badb"
Brazil Much feared serpent goddess. Brazil
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"COATLICUE (the serpent-skirted goddess)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Mother goddess. The creator goddess of the earth and mankind and the female aspect of OMETEOTL. One of the group clåśśed as the TETEOINNAN complex. She has 400 sons, the stars of the southern sky, and is the mother of the goddess COYOLXAUHQUI. Later, as a widow, she was impregnated by a ball of feathers as she was sweeping the “serpent mountain” of Coatepec near Tula. Her other children decapitated her as punishment for her dishonor, but she gave birth to the Sun god HUITZILOPOCHTLI who subsequently slew Coyolxauhqui and her brothers, thus banishing night for day. According to tradition Coatlicue feeds off human corpses. She is also recognized as the patron deity of florists....
Goddess name
"Gunabibi"
Australian aboriginal Creator goddess. Also known as Kunapipi, she is extensively revered by aborigines in northern Australia, including the Yolngu people. Her cult bears some similarity to that of the Greek mother goddess DEMETER and to Tantric cults in India. For this reason the cult is thought to have been introduced from Asia to Arnhem Land and then to other parts of the Australian continent as early as the sixth century. Mythology indicates that Gunabibi has been perceived as a deity who came from the sea or the rivers during the Dreamtime but who reigns now over dry land. Among modern aborigines she is the subject of esoteric rituals which also involve the great serpent Yulunggul with whom Gunabibi has been closely involved....
Goddess name
"Hygeia"
Roman / Greek Goddess of health and the daughter of ?sculapios. Her symbol was a serpent drinking from a cup in her hand. Roman / Greek
Goddess name
"Kebechet"
Egypt Chthonic snake goddess. The daughter of ANUBIS who was involved in the cult of the dead as the deity responsible for libations. She is depicted as a serpent....
Goddess name
"Maju"
Basque / Pyrenean region God. The consort of the mother goddess MARI, he appears in the guise of a serpent....
Goddess name
"Manasa"
Hindu Snake goddess. The daughter of KASYAPA and KADRU and the sister of the lord of serpents, Vasuki. She is also a gracious aspect of PARVATI. Known particuarly from Bihar, Bengal and Assam. She stands upon, or is shaded by, a seven-headed snake. Attributes: snake and waterjar....
Goddess name
"Melusine"
Britain / Scotland A serpent goddess
Goddess name
"NINURTA (lord plough)"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian / Iraq God of thunderstorms and the plough. Ninurta is the Sumerian god of farmers and is identified with the plough. He is also the god of thunder and the hero of the Sumerian pantheon, closely linked with the confrontation battles between forces of good and evil that characterize much of Mesopotamian literature. He is one of several challengers of the malignant dragon or serpent Kur said to inhabit the empty space between the earth's crust and the primeval sea beneath. Ninurta is the son of Enlil and Ninhursaga a, alternatively Ninlil, and is the consort of Gula, goddess of healing. He is attributed with the creation of the mountains which he is said to have built from giant stones with which he had fought against the demon Asag. He wears the horned helmet and tiered skirt and carries a weapon Sarur which becomes personified in the texts, having its own intelligence and being the chief adversary, in the hands of Ninurta, of Kur. He carries the double-edged scimitar-mace embellished with lions' heads and, according to some authors, is depicted in nonhuman form as the thunderbird lmdugud (sling stone), which bears the head of a lion and may represent the hailstones of the god. His sanctuary is the E-padun-tila. Ninurta is perceived as a youthful warrior and probably equates with the Babylonian heroic god Marduk. His cult involved a journey to Eridu from both Nippur and Girsu. He may be compared with Is”kur, who was worshiped primarily by herdsmen as a storm god....
Goddess name
"Nehebka"
Egypt serpent-headed Goddess who aided Anubis in the embalming and funeral rites. Egypt
Goddess name
"Taiaai"
Australian aboriginal Snake god. His consorts include the snake goddesses Mantya, Tuknampa and Uka. He is revered mainly by tribal groups living on the western seaboard of the Cape York peninsula in northern queensland. Taipan has the typical attributes of many other Australian snake gods, including the Rainbow snake. He exercises judgment over life or death and possesses great wisdom, a universal characteristic of serpents. He is able to kill or cure and is the deity who originally fashioned the blood of living things during the Dreamtime. The imagery of the snake god is closely linked with aboriginal shamanism and with the healing rituals of shamans....
Goddess name
"Tezcacoac Ayopechtli (mirror serpent tortoise bench)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Birth goddess. An aspect of XOCHIQUETZAL. One of the group clåśśed as the TETEOINNAN complex....

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.


Significance:

She was mainly known for being the patron goddess of lower Egypt. Because of this she was commonly associated with Nekhbet, another god of lower Egypt. She was called the serpent goddess. Even thought serpents were associated with evil, Wadjet was considered a good deity. She was considered a protector of all. The reason kings wore her form on their head was to bring them protection from evil and sickness. She is a very old goddess; some think her eye is the actual eye of Horus. She is commonly associated with this eye of power. She was a fierce warrior, and an adequate opponent. She was depicted as a protector of the dead.
She was supposed to protect the newly dead as they traveled into the afterlife. Egyptians thought if they placed her figure on earns and coffins, whoever was inside would have an easy passage to the underworld. Her life and existence was celebrated on December 25th (our time), this date was said to be the fifth hour of the fifth day. She was sent on a mission to find her lost brothers Tefnut and Shu. Her life was surrounded by mystery, and danger. In her journey to find her brothers she was encountered by many people that would rather see head dead, than have her find the lost gods. The enemies of Atum sought her out, and tried to kill her. Atum was her father. They didn’t want Atum to have any male children, because this would give him more power. She was said to have allies that accompanied her on this journey, but they aren’t well known.

Family:

Her father was Atum, and she was said to be his eyes. Wadjet had one sister, Nekhbet. She eventually found her two brothers Tefnut and Shu. Her and her father Atum had a great relationship. Atum was responsible for telling everyone that if you put Wadjet’s form on items for the afterlife, she would protect them on their journeys.