8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "God Isl" - 146 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Laka"
Polynesian / Hawaii Goddess of dancing. A minor deity who is nonetheless greatly revered by islanders in a hedonistic cult of song, dance and sexual liberality....
Goddess name
"Le Fay"
Welsh Goddess of the sea and of the Isle of Avalon Welsh
God name
"Lesa"
southeastern African Creator god. The name by which the supreme deity is known across a wide area of Zambia and Zimbabwe. Equating to LISA in regions of West Africa. Also regarded as a Rain god. Probably strongly influenced by Islam and, to a lesser extent, by Christianity. Also Leza....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Lisa"
Fon / others / Benin, West Africa Creator god. Probably the equivalent of LESA in parts of East Africa. The supreme deity, whose more or less monotheistic role may have been influenced by the spread of Islam and Christianity....
God name
"Lono (sound)"
Polynesian / Hawaii Primordial being. An aspect of a tripartite god which also includes KANE, the light, and KU, stability. They first existed in chaos and night which they broke into pieces, allowing light to come in. Also Ono (Marquesas Islands)....
God name
"Make Make"
Polynesia God of creation. Polynesia, Easter Island
God name
"Make Make"
Polynesian / Easter Island Sea god. The tutelary deity of the Easter Islanders, he created mankind and animals. His sacred animal is the sea swallow and the huge anthropomorphic stone figures which characterize the island's archaeology form part of his cult....
God name
"Malakbel"
Pre - Islamic northern Arabian vegetation god. Mentioned as the brother of AGLIBOL on an inscription at Palmyra dated to AD 132....
God name
"Malik (king)"
Pre - Islamic northern Arabian Tutelary god. Known from inscriptions....
God name
"Manannan (Mac Lir)"
Celtic / Irish / British Sea god. Extensively worshiped. From the name is derived the “Isle of Man” where, according to tradition, the god is buried. He rules the “Isle of the Blessed” and determines the weather at sea. Father of the Irish hero Mongan. Also Manawyddaw (Welsh)....
God name
"Manannan Mac Lir"
Ireland / Welsh / Scots The god of the sea. He is often seen as a psychopomp, whose responsibility is to escort newly-deceased souls to the afterlife, and considered to have strong connections to the Otherworld islands of the dead, the weather, and the mists between the worlds. Ireland / Welsh / Scots
Goddess name
"Manat (fate)"
Pre - Islamic / Arabian Goddess. One of the socalled Daughters of ALLAH, she is primarily identified with a shrine (lost) between Mecca and Medina....
Deities name
"Mandah"
Pre - Islamic / Arabian Collective name of gods. Guardian deities, whose chief responsibility is irrigation....
Goddess name
"Mandulis [Greek]"
Nubian Sun god. Mandulis was chiefly revered in a Greco-Roman cult. His most important sanctuary was at Kalabsha, close to the Aswan High Dam, and now relocated. A sanctuary was also constructed on the Greek island of Philae where he seems to have enjoyed an åśśociation with the goddess ISIS. Also Merwel (Egyptian)....
God name
"Marnas"
Pre - Islamic northern Arabian Local tutelary god. Probably regarded as a fertility deity, his cult was centered at Gaza at the Marneion sanctuary and probably succeeded that of Dagon. He may have been the subject of a colossal statue attributed to ZEUS found near Gaza.See also DAGAN....
Goddess name
"Maui"
Polynesian / Maori / New Zealand Tutelary god. Not a creator god but one who åśśists mankind in various supernatural ways. According to tradition he was aborted at birth and cast into the sea by his mother, who thought he was dead. He was rescued entangled in seaweed. He is the deity who drew the islands of New Zealand from the floor of the ocean in a net. Maui caught the Sun and beat it into submission, making it travel more slowly across the sky so that the days became longer. He also brought fire from the underworld for mankind and tried, unsuccessfully, to harness immortality for him by entering the vulva of the underworld goddess HINE-NUI-TE-PO while she was asleep. She awoke and crushed him to death. Though a deity, he had been made vulnerable to death by a mistake during his rites of birth (see also Balder). Also Mawi....
God name
"Muati"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Obscure local god. Associated in some texts with the mythical island Paradise of Dilmun, he becomes syncretized with NABU....
Supreme god name
"Mukasa"
Buganda / Uganda, East Africa Supreme god. A benevolent deity whose main oracular sanctuary was sited on the island of Bubembe, lake Victoria. His first high priest was Semagunga and, by convention, only the tribal leader was permitted to consult with the oracle there. Mukasa provides Rain, food and cattle....
God name
"Nahi"
Pre - Islamic northern Arabian Guardian god. Generally of benevolent nature....
God name
"Nareau"
Islands Creator god. Gilbert Islands
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.