8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Origin" - 261 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Aristaios"
Greek God of herdsmen. The consort of Autonoe. Of ancient origin, worshiped by peasants as a guardian of herds and beekeepers. The cult continued for many centuries at Kyrene [Libya]....
Goddess name
"Arya-Tara (the honorable Tara)"
Buddhist Goddess. The SAKTI of AMOGHASIDDHI. Her name is often abbreviated to TARA and she originates from the TAM bija or seed. Color: green. Attributes: green lotus and staff. Also VASYA-TARA....
God name
"Asar"
Arabian A horse-god revered in ancient Palmyra, possibly of Arabian origin.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deity name
"Atunis aka Atuns"
Etruscan The Etruscan incarnation of the popular life-death-rebirth deity. He is a consort for Turan. Originally non-Etruscan, directly from Greek Adonis. Etruscan
Goddess name
"BAAL (lord)"
Western Semitic / Canaanite / northern Israel, Lebanon / later Egypt vegetation deity and national god. Baal may have originated in pre-agricultural times as god of storms and Rain. He is the son of DAGAN and in turn is the father of seven storm gods, the Baalim of the Vetus Testamentum, and seven midwife goddesses, the SASURATUM. He is considered to have been worshiped from at least the nineteenth century BC. Later he became a vegetation god concerned with fertility of the land. From the mid-sixteenth century BC in the Egyptian New kingdom, Baal enjoyed a significant cult following, but the legend of his demise and restoration was never equated with that of OSIRIS. In the Greco-Roman period, Baal became åśśimilated in the Palestine region with ZEUS and JUPITER, but as a Punic deity [Carthage] he was allied with SATURNUS, the god of seed-sowing....
God name
"BAIAME"
Australian aboriginal Creator God. Baiame is a creator god, revered as the supreme being and instrument of good, principally by the Wiradyuri and Kamilaroi groups of aborigines in the southeast of Australia. His chief consort is generally referred to as BIRRAHGNOOLOO. In other aboriginal traditions he is known as Twanyrika....
Goddess name
"BRIGIT (exalted one)"
Celtic / Continental / European / Irish Fertility goddess. A major Celtic pastoral deity, described as a “wise woman, the daughter of the DAGDA,” Brigit became “Christianized” as St. Brigit of Kildare, who lived from AD 450-523 and founded the first female Christian community in Ireland. She was originally celebrated on February 1 in the festival of Imbolc....
God name
"Baa! Ma!age"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Local tutelary god. Probably of Canaanite origin, closely equating with BAAL SAMIN and known only from inscriptions....
Deities name
"Baa! Samin (lord of heaven)"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Head of the pantheon. Probably originated in Canaanite culture as a god of Rain and vegetation, but became extensively revered in places as far apart as Cyprus and Carthage. Epithets include “bearer of thunder.” Baal Samin is first mentioned in a fourteenth century BC treaty between the Hittite king Suppiluliuma and Nigmadu II of Ugarit. He had a major sanctuary at Byblos, according to inscription, “built by Yehemilk.” Josephus confirms that his cult existed at the time of Solomon. At Karatepe his name appears at the head of a list of national deities and on Seleucid coinage he is depicted wearing a half-moon crown and carrying a radiate Sun disc. Other epithets include “lord of eternity” and he may also have been god of storms at sea, a patron deity of mariners. By Hellenic times he equated with ZEUS in the Greek pantheon and the Romans identified him as Caelus (sky). Also Baal-Samem....
Deities name
"Baa! Sapon"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Local tutelary god. Probably of Canaanite origin and closely equating with BAAL SAMIN. According to Ugaritic texts he lives on a mountain in the north of Phoenicia known as Saphan, which may have served as a beacon for mariners. Other local variations of mountain deities include Baal Hermon and Baal Brathy....
God name
"Baal/ Hadad"
Canaan A storm god[originally meant lord]

"Bacis"
Greek Seems to have been originally only a common noun derived from to speak, and to have signified any prophet or speaker. In later times, however, Bacis was regarded as a proper noun, and the ancients distinguish several seers of this name. Greek
Goddess name
"Balarama (strength of Rama)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Incarnation of the god VIS'NU. May have originated in Vedic times as an agricultural fertility deity. He is the son of VASUDEVA and DEVAKI, though born from the womb of ROHINI. Jointly with KRSNA (his brother), he is identified as the eighth avatara (incarnation) of Vis'nu, or, with RAMA, as the seventh. Legend describes how Vis'nu impregnated the belly of the goddess Devaki with two hairs, one black, one white. To ensure their safety against a demon king, they were transferred before birth to Rohini. Krsna grew to be dark-skinned, and Balarama light. The latter enjoys similar characteristics to Krsna but fails to attract the same popularity. He is usually depicted on the right side of Krsna, rarely standing alone. The consort of Balarama is REVATI and his sons are Nisatha and Ulmuka. Epithets included Ananda (joy). In Jainism he is known as Baladeva. Attributes: arrow, club, drinking cup, fan palm, honey pot, lotus, pestle, pitcher, plough, prayer wheel, shield and sword....
God name
"Banebdjedet"
Egypt Ba of the Lord of Mendes a fertility god and originally a ram with horns shaped like cork-screws, later he was often thought of as a he-goat. According to Herodotus his followers did not sacrifice goats. Egypt
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Greek The goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. Greek
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
God name
"Bethel"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Local tutelary god. Probably of Aramaean or Syrian origin. First mentioned in a fourteenth century treaty between the Hittite king Suppiluliuma and Nigmadu II of Ugarit [Ras Samra]. He appears more regularly on inscriptions from the end of the seventh century BC and enjoyed considerable popularity during the neo-Babylonian period. Bethel is mentioned in the Biblical text of Jeremiah 48.13, implying that some Israelites acknowledged this deity. There is no evidence of links with the historical place names, including that mentioned in Genesis 38.13....
Spirit name
"Bhagavan (the lord)"
Northern / central Indian Tutelary god. Worshiped by the Bhils and other tribes as the original creator spirit and a judge of the dead soul. Also an epithet of VISNU and KRSNA. Also Bhagwan....
King name
"Binzuru-Sonja"
Japan One of the pupils of Buddha, the first of the sixteen Rakan. Rakan with grey hair and long eyebrows. Originally he was a retainer of the king, Uuten. He became a priest and attained miracle power by performing Arakan's vow. It is said that he was praised by Shaka for he used the miracle power for the world and that he didn't enter Nirvana and made efforts cultivating ordinary people. He was worshipped on the above in Theravada Buddhism, however, many are worshipped in restaurants in China. He is enshrined in front of a temple in Japan. It is believed that stroking him eliminates distresses. Japan
Goddess name
"Birrahgnooloo"
Australian aboriginal Creator goddess. She is recognized by several aboriginal clans as the chief consort of BAIAME, the creator god. Revered as the all-mother of humankind and creator of living things on earth, her role largely parallels that of Baiame. Traditions suggest that during the Dreamtime she planted vegetation as she moved through the primordial world, fashioning creatures from clay and breathing spirit into human beings. Her eldest son is DARAMULUM or Gayandi, regarded as an intermediary between Baiame and humankind....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.