8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Roman" - 287 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Egeria"
Roman Fertility goddess. deity of oak trees whose priestess enacted an annual sacred marriage with the king of Rome, who took the part of JUPITER. The festival is a variation of that celebrating the marriage of ZEUS and HERA which took place in Athens. A number of springs and lakes were sacred to her....
Goddess name
"Eriiys"
Greek Chthonic goddess of wrath. According to legend she was a consort of POSEIDON by whom she bore the fabulous horse Areon. By implication she may also have been a grim maternal figure who engendered all horses. She may be equated with a wrathful DEMETER who is sometimes given the epithet Erinys. Erinys appears in the collec tive form of three Erinyes, their heads covered with snake locks and bearing torches from the underworld. In the Iliad they are described as those “who beneath the earth punish dead men, whoever has sworn a false oath.” In Roman mythology they are the Furies....
Goddess name
"Eris"
Greek Goddess of dissent or strife. The consort of ARES, the god of war, and the mother of HORKOS (oath). She is depicted throwing the apple of discord among guests at a wedding, offering it “to the fairest” to provoke argument. In Roman mythology she becomes DISCORDIA....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Fate"
Roman A goddess of fate
Goddess name
"Fatua"
Roman A Roman goddess identified with Gaea. Known as the kind goddess because of her benevolence towards all creatures.
Goddess name
"Faun"
Roman Place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. Romans connected their fauns with the Greek satyrs, wild and orgiastic drunken followers of Dionysus. However, fauns and satyrs were originally quite different creatures. Both have horns and both resemble goats below the waist, humans above; but originally satyrs had human feet, fauns goatlike hooves. The Romans also had a god named Faunus and a goddess Fauna, who, like the fauns, were goat-people. Roman
Goddess name
"Fauna"
Roman Minor vegetation goddess. Consort of FAUNUS with guardianship of woods and plants....
Goddess name
"Febris"
Roman The goddess of fever, or rather the averter of fever. Roman
Goddess name
"Feronia"
Roman Goddess of orchards and protects freed men. Roman Also regarded as a goddess of the earth or the lower world because she is said to have given to her son three souls, so that Evander had to kill him thrice before he was dead. Roman
Goddess name
"Flora"
Roman Goddess of gardens, plants, flowers, love, prostitution,spring and youth. Her festival was celebrated from the 28th of April till the first of May, with extravagant merriment and lasciviousness. The resemblance between the names Flora and Chloris led the later Romans to identify the two divinities. Roman
Goddess name
"Flora"
Roman Goddess of flowers. Consort of ZEPHYRUS and chiefly worshiped by young girls with offerings of fruit and flowers. Her major festivals, with strongly sexual overtones but also identified with the dead, were celebrated in the spring months from April 28 to early May and known as Floralia....
Goddess name
"Fluonia"
Roman A surname of the goddess Juno. Roman
Goddess name
"Fons"
Roman Goddess of fountains Roman
Goddess name
"Fornax"
Roman A Roman goddess, who is said to have been worshipped that she might ripen the corn, and prevent its being burnt in baking in the oven. Roman
Goddess name
"Fortuna"
Roman The goddess of chance or good luck, was worshipped both in Greece and Italy, and more particularly at Rome, where she was considered as the steady goddess of good luck, success, and every kind of prosperity. Roman
Goddess name
"Fortuna"
Roman Goddess of good fortune. A deity who particularly appealed to women, partly in an oracular context. She is depicted carrying a globe, rudder and cornucopiae. She probably evolved from the model of the Greek goddess TYCHE. Her main symbol is the wheel of fate which she may stand upon and Renaissance artists tended to depict her thus. Among her more celebrated sanctuaries in Rome, the temple of Fortuna Redux was built by Domitian to celebrate his victories in Germany. She is depicted in a well-known stone carving in Gloucester Museum, England, holding her three main attributes....
Goddess name
"Furiae aka dirae"
Greek / Roman Eumenides, erinyes,, were originally nothing but a personification of curses pronounced upon a guilty criminal. The name Erinnys, which is the more ancient one, was derived by the Greeks from "I hunt up or persecute", or from the Arcadian "I am angry"; so that the Furiae were either the angry goddesses, or the goddesses who hunt up or search after the criminal. Greek / Roman
Goddess name
"Furiae/ Furies"
Roman The goddesses of justice & robbers
Goddess name
"Gratiae"
Roman Goddesses. The counterparts of the Greek Charites. Identified with the arts and generally depicted with long flowing tresses, but otherwise naked....
Goddess name
"Hamavehae"
Roman Trinity of mother goddesses Roman / Rhineland
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.