8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Japan" - 315 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Asuha-No-Kami"
Shinto / Japan God of courtyards. A guardian deity, one of many in Shintoism, concerned with the protection of houses and their environs....
Deity name
"Azumi-no-isora"
Japan / Shinto Is a shinto deity of the seasĥōřé. He is considered to be an ancestor of the Azumi family. He is worshiped at Mekari Shrine of Kitakyushu, Shiga Shrine of Tsushima. Japan / Shinto
Deity name
"Basosenin"
Japan A stellar deity, one of the Nijuhachibushu. Japan
Goddess name
"Benten aka Benzi-Ten"
Japan / Shinto Goddess of everything that flows: words, knowledge, speech, eloquence, and music. Japan / Shinto
Goddess name
"Benten-San"
Japan / Shinto The only goddess among of the seven deities of good fortune
Goddess name
"Benten-San"
Shinto / Japan Goddess of luck. One of seven deities clåśśed as gods of fortune and the only goddess in the group. A popular deity with many sanctuaries dedicated to her, she is a patron of music and holds a biwa instrument in her hand. Snakes, believed to stand for jealousy, are often coiled around her statues. Because of this, married couples are reluctant to visit her shrines together. Her priesthood is both Shinto and Buddhist and she is closely linked with the goddess SARASVATI....
Goddess name
"Benzi-Ten/ Benten/ Benzai-Tenno"
Japan The goddess of eloquence, language, arts, fortune, water, & knowledge
King name
"Binzuru-Sonja"
Japan One of the pupils of Buddha, the first of the sixteen Rakan. Rakan with grey hair and long eyebrows. Originally he was a retainer of the king, Uuten. He became a priest and attained miracle power by performing Arakan's vow. It is said that he was praised by Shaka for he used the miracle power for the world and that he didn't enter Nirvana and made efforts cultivating ordinary people. He was worshipped on the above in Theravada Buddhism, however, many are worshipped in restaurants in China. He is enshrined in front of a temple in Japan. It is believed that stroking him eliminates distresses. Japan
God name
"Bishamon"
Japan One of the seven gods of luck and the Buddhist patron of warriors. Japan
Deities name
"Bishamon"
Shinto / Japan God of luck. One of seven deities concerned with fortune, he appears as a warrior clad in full armor holding a spear in one hand and a toy pagoda, identified as a “tower of treasure” in the other. He has been linked with the Buddhist god Vaisravana (KUBERA)....
Demon name
"Bishamon-Ten/ Bishamontenno/ Tiamontennu"
Japan A god of wealth & protector of human life that chases demons

"Bodhisattva (one whose essence is perfect knowledge)"
Buddhist / northern India, Tibet, China / Japan Generic title for a buddha-designate. Any one of the earlier stages of a future buddha. Depicted wearing regal dress and trappings, including a crown. The most significant include AVALOKITESVARA, MAITREYA and MANJUSRI....

"Butsugen aka Butsubo"
Japan A manifestation of the eyes of Nyorai. eyes originally has infinite virtue to produce wisdom. Japan
God name
"Chimata No Kami"
Japan God of crossroads, roads and footpaths. Japan
Goddess name
"Chup Kamui"
Ainu Goddess of war and the Sun Japan / Ainu

"Daiboth"
Japanese A Japanese idol of colossal size. Each of her hands is full of hands.
God name
"Daikokr"
Shinto / Japan God of luck. One of seven gods of fortune in Shintoism and often linked with the god EBISU. Originally a god of kitchens, he became a deity concerned with happiness. He is depicted as a fat, well-to-do figure seated on two rice bales and carrying a sack on his back. He also holds a hammer in his right hand. In depictions there is often a mouse nibbling at one of the rice bales. Small gold icons of the god may be carried as talismans of wealth. According to tradition, when Daikoku's hammer is shaken, money falls out in great profusion. In western Japan he is also syncretized with the god of rice paddies, TA-NO-KAMI, and thus becomes the god of Agriculture and farmers. He may have developed from the Buddhist god MAHAKALA....
God name
"Daikoku"
Japan God of wealth and happiness and one of the Seven Gods of Fortune. The god invoked specially by the artisans of Japan. He sits on a ball of rice, holding a hammer in his hand, with which he beats a sack; and every time he does so the sack becomes full of silver, rice, cloth, and other useful articles. Japan
God name
"Ebisu"
Japan God of fishermen, good luck, and workingmen, as well as the guardian of the health of small children. Japan
God name
"Ebisu"
Shinto / Japan God of luck. The most popular of seven gods of fortune recognized in Shintoism and frequently linked with the god DAIKOKU. He is depicted as a fat, smiling and bearded fisherman holding a fishing rod in one hand and a sea bream in the other. The name does not appear in the clåśśical sacred texts Nibongi and Kojiki, but Ebisu is known to have been worshiped in ancient times among fishermen. From about the sixteenth century his character changed and he became a deity åśśociated with profit. Thus he is a patron of commerce and his picture hangs in most establishments. He is perhaps syncretized with the gods HIRUKO and KOTO-SHIRO-NUSHI. He may also be identified with Fudo, the god of knowledge. He does not join the rest of the Shinto pantheon in the great October festival at Izumo because he is deaf. His festival is celebrated concurrently in his own temple....
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8 ways to attend college for free

With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.

However, the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.

If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.

We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.

Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.



7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.