8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Pre Greek" - 126 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Demon name
"Bathym aka Bathim"
Greek Bathin, Marthin. One of the three demons in the service of Fleuretty. Duke of the Infernal regions he has the appearance of a robust man but his body ends in a serpent's tail. He is well versed in the virtues of herbs and precious stones according to Wierius. He is able to transport men from one place to another with wondrous speed. He commands thirty legions. One of the 72 spirits of Solomon.
God name
"Battus"
Greek A shepherd of Neleus, who saw Hermes driving away the cattle he had stolen from Apollo. The god promised to reward him if he would not betray what he had seen. Battus promised on oath to keep the secret but as Hermes mistrusted him nevertheless, he åśśumed a different appearance, returned to Battus, and promised him a handsome present, if he would tell him who had stolen the cattle of Apollo. Greek
God name
"Bel"
Babylonian Signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian religion. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek and Latin by Belos and Belus respectively. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic Ba‘al with the same meaning.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Butes"
Greek Son of Boreas, a Thracian, was hostile towards his step-brother Lycurgus, and therefore compelled by his father to emigrate. He accordingly went with a band of colonists to the island of Strongyle, afterwards called Naxos. But as he and his companions had no women, they made predatory excursions, and also came to Thessaly, where they carried off the women who were just celebrating a festival of Dionysus. Butes himself took Coronis; but she invoked Dionysus, who struck Butes with madness, so that he threw himself into a well. Greek
God name
"Caacrinolaas"
Greek Grand President of Hell, a god with the wings of a griffon. He inspires knowledge of the liberal arts and incites homicide.
King name
"Cecrops"
Greek According to Apollodorus the first king of Attica, which derived from him its name Cecropia, having previously borne the name of Acte. He is described as an autochthon, the upper part of whose body was human, while the lower was that of a dragon. Hence he is gemimis. Greek
God name
"Chaos"
Greek The vacant and infinite space which existed according to the ancient cosmogonies previous to the creation of the world (Theogony 116), and out of which the gods, men, and all things arose. Greek

"Cithara"
Greek One of the most ancient stringed instruments, traced back to 1700 B.C. among the Semitic races, in Egypt, Assyria, Asia Minor, Greece and the Roman empire, whence the use of it spread over Europe. Greek

"Clotho"
Greek One of the Three Fates. She presided over birth, and drew from her distaff the thread of life, Atropos presided over death and cut the thread of life, and Lachesis spun the fate of life between birth and death. Greek

"Cluricaun"
Greek A Leprechaun who raids wine cellars and tortures sheep and dogs by riding them like horses.

"Cynthia"
Greek / Roman The moon, a surname of Artemis or Diana. The Roman Diana, who represented the moon, was called Cynthia from Mount Cynthus, where she was born. Greek / Roman

"Cyparissus"
Greek A youth of Cea, a son of Telephus, was beloved by Apollo and Zephyrus or Silvåñuś. When he had inadvertently killed his favourite stag, he was seized with immoderate grief, and metamorphosed into a cypress. Greek
Goddess name
"Daphne"
Greek Oracular goddess. A number of oracular shrines were dedicated to her in various places in Asia Minor, including Antiocheia, Mopsuestia (Cilicia), Sura and Patara (Lycia), Telmessos (Caria). Represented by the laurel Dapbne she is linked with the Dapbnepboria festivals honoring APOLLO. Tradition has it that she was changed into the laurel to avoid sexual submission to the god....

"Deima"
Greek The personification of fear. She was represented in the form of a fearful woman on the tomb of Medeia's children at Corinth. Greek
Angel name
"Dorothea"
Greek Represented with a rose-branch in her hand, a wreath of roses on her head, and roses with fruit by her side; sometimes with an angel carrying a basket with three apples and three roses. The legend is that Theophilus, the judge's secretary, scoffingly said to her, as she was going to execution, "Send me some fruit and roses, Dorothea, when you get to Paradise." Immediately after her execution, while Theophilus was at dinner with a party of companions, a young angel brought to him a basket of apples and roses, saying, "From Dorothea, in Paradise," and vanished.
God name
"Eleuther"
Greek A son of Apollo and Aethusa, the daughter of Poseidon, was regarded as the founder of Eleutherae in Boeotia. He was the grandfather of Jasius and Poemander, the founder of Tanagra. He is said to have been the first that erected a statue of Dionysus, and spread the worship of the god. Greek

"Epiales"
Greek The personification of the cold shivering fit which precedes an attack of fever. Greek

"Epimetheus"
Greek Was the brother of Prometheus ("foresight", literally "fore-thought"), a pair of Titans who "acted as representatives of mankind". They were the inseparable sons of Japetus, who in other contexts was the father of Atlas. Greek

"Eurybates aka Eribotes"
Greek The son of Teleon, was one of the Argonauts, and appears to have acted as surgeon, as he is represented as attending on Oileus when he was wounded by one of the Stymphalian birds.. (Argonautica). Greek

"Eurylochus"
Greek One of the companions of Odysseus in his wanderings. He was the only one that escaped from the house of Circe, while his friends were metamorphosed into swine; and when Odysseus went to the lower world, Eurylochus and Perimedes performed the prescribed sacrifices. It was on his advice that the companions of Odysseus carried off some of the oxen of Helios. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.