8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "serpent" - 107 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Abraxas/ Abrsax/ Abraxis"
Greek / Oriental an occult theonym this god has the torso & arms of a man, head of a rooster & serpent legs
God name
"Adimurti (the primeval personification)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Form or avatara of the god VIS'NU. Probably very similar to NARAYANA. Conventionally perceived as Vis'nu seated on the coils of the serpent SESA (Adisesa) and attended by two wives. Attributes: those of Vis'nu. Also Vaikunthanatha, Paramapathanatha....

"Adissechen"
Indian The serpent with a thousand heads which sustains the universe. Indian
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Afrasiab"
Roman A serpent identified by the Scythians with archfiend Ahriman.
Demon name
"Ahi"
Hindu A serpent aka Vritra, the Vedic demon of drought. Hindu
Demon name
"Aim"
Christian Aka Haborym, Aym, is a fire demon and a duke of hell, who commands 26 legions. He appears holding a torch and riding a viper and he has 3 heads: a serpent, a man, and a cat.

"Amon"
Greek Commands forty legions, can appear in the form of a wolf with a serpent's tail and vomiting flames. In human form, he has the head of an owl and his beak shows canine teeth. He was the supreme diety of the Egyptians, who had blue skin in human form. Amon can tell of the past and the future, and reconcile the differences between friends.
Deities name
"Ananta"
Hindu / Puranic The world serpent in Hindu mythology. During the night of Brahma, Vishnu sleeps on coils of prodigious snake, Sesha, also known as Ananta, 'the endless' whose thousand heads rise above the deity like a canopy. This scene and everything in it, the deities' serpentine couch, the water on which the snake lies, are all manifestations of the primeval essence. Hindu / Puranic

"Angitia"
Greek Taught the people remedies against the poison of serpents, and had derived her name from being able to kill serpents by her incantations. Greek
God name
"Anshur aka Ashur"
Akkadian Or Asshur, a sky god and the husband of his sister Kishar ("earth axle"); they are the children of the serpents Lahmu and Lahamu, and the parents of Anu and Ea. He is sometimes depicted as having Ninlil as a consort. As Anshar, he is progenitor of the Akkadian pantheon; as Ashur, he is the head of the Assyrian pantheon
Deity name
"Antaboga"
Indonesia underworld serpent deity. At the beginning of time, only Antaboga existed. Antaboga meditated and created the world turtle Bedwang from which all other creations sprang. Indonesia

"Antiewo"
West Africa The Great serpent who comes out after the Rain. The Rainbow is his reflection. West Africa
Demon name
"Apep"
Egypt Aka Apepi, Apophis. demon enemy of the Sun this huge serpent caused storms and eclipses and ate the Sun at evening. Rules over: darkness, storm, night, the underworld, death, eclipses. Egypt
Goddess name
"Ayida"
Haiti Goddess of Rainbows, especially in Benin and Haiti, Ayida-Weddo aka Aida-Wedo, Aido Quedo, a loa of fertility, Rainbows and snakes, and a companion or wife to Damballah-Wedo. Also Ayida-Weddo is known as the Rainbow serpent. Haiti

"Azidahaka"
Persia A serpent with three heads, six eyes and three pairs of fangs. He was the adversary of Yima. Persia
Goddess name
"Badb"
Brazil A much feared serpent goddess
Goddess name
"Badb"
Brazil Much feared serpent goddess. Brazil
Demon name
"Bathym aka Bathim"
Greek Bathin, Marthin. One of the three demons in the service of Fleuretty. Duke of the Infernal regions he has the appearance of a robust man but his body ends in a serpent's tail. He is well versed in the virtues of herbs and precious stones according to Wierius. He is able to transport men from one place to another with wondrous speed. He commands thirty legions. One of the 72 spirits of Solomon.
Goddess name
"COATLICUE (the serpent-skirted goddess)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Mother goddess. The creator goddess of the earth and mankind and the female aspect of OMETEOTL. One of the group clåśśed as the TETEOINNAN complex. She has 400 sons, the stars of the southern sky, and is the mother of the goddess COYOLXAUHQUI. Later, as a widow, she was impregnated by a ball of feathers as she was sweeping the “serpent mountain” of Coatepec near Tula. Her other children decapitated her as punishment for her dishonor, but she gave birth to the Sun god HUITZILOPOCHTLI who subsequently slew Coyolxauhqui and her brothers, thus banishing night for day. According to tradition Coatlicue feeds off human corpses. She is also recognized as the patron deity of florists....

"Cirein Croin"
Caithness A sea-serpent and the largest animal in the world. Celtic. Caithness
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.