8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "divinity" - 110 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Ghost name
"Aatxe"
Basque A Basque ghost. He is a cave-dwelling divinity who adopts the form of a young red bull, but sometimes in the shape of a man. At night, more so in stormy weather, he arises from the hollow which is his lair, also known as Euskal Herria. He attacks criminals and other mean people. He also protects people by making them stay home when danger is near.

"Ahura Mazda"
Persia An exalted divinity of ancient proto-Indo-Iranian religion that was subsequently declared by Zarathustra (Zoroaster) to be the one uncreated creator of all. Persia

"Ammon"
Africa Originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, parts of Africa, and many parts of Greece. The real Egyptian name was Amun or Ammun.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Aphaea"
Greek Aka Britomartis, appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek
God name
"Apis"
Egyptian Apis the Bull of Memphis, is called the greatest of gods, and the god of all nations, while others regard him more in the light of a symbol of some great divinity. Egyptian
Nymph name
"Arethusa"
Greek One of the Nereid, and the nymph of the famous well, thus in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse. Alpheius reckons her among the Sicilian nymphs, and as the divinity who inspired pastoral poetry.

"Aristaeus"
Greece An ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. He is described either as a son of Uråñuś and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius.
God name
"Asclepius"
Greek Or Aesculapius, the god of the medical art. In the Homeric poems Aesculapius does not appear to be considered as a divinity, but merely as a human being. No allusion is made to his descent, and he is merely mentioned as the the father of Machaon and Podaleirius.
God name
"Ate"
Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony), a daughter of Eris, and, according to Homer, of Zeus, was an ancient Greek divinity, who led both gods and men to rash and inconsiderate actions and to suffering.

"Atseatsan"
Haudenosaunee First man and a solar divinity, He and his wife raise the Sun up into the heavens on long poles, since it is too hot to take hold of directly. Haudenosaunee

"Auxo 1"
Greek One of the Horae. 2. An ancient Attic divinity, who was worshipped, according to Pausanias, together with Hegemone, under the name of Charites
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Greek The goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. Greek
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
Hero name
"Belus"
Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.
Goddess name
"Bod"
Indian The divinity invoked by Indian women who desire fecundity. Children born after an invocation to Bod must be redeemed, or else serve in the temple of the goddess. Indian

"Bona Dea"
Roman A Roman divinity, who is described as the sister, wife, or daughter of Faunus, and was herself called Fauna, Fatua, or Oma, worshipped at Rome from the earliest times as a chaste and prophetic divinity; and her worship was so exclusively confined to women.

"Britomartis"
Greek Appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek

"Buto"
Egypt An Egyptian divinity, whom the Greeks identified with their Leto, and who was worshipped principally in the town of Buto, which derived its name from her. Festivals were celebrated there in her honour, and there she had also an oracle which was in high esteem among the Egyptians. Egypt
Nymph name
"Camenae"
Roman Aka Casmenae, Carmenae Carmentis, prophetic nymphs. Two of the Camenae were Antevorta and Postvorta. The third was Carmenta or Carmentis, a prophetic and healing divinity. Roman
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.