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God Name and Meaning

List of Gods   : "divinity"

NameOriginDescription
Ghost name "Aatxe" Basque A Basque ghost. He is a cave-dwelling divinity who adopts the form of a young red bull, but sometimes in the shape of a man. At night, more so in stormy weather, he arises from the hollow which is his lair, also known as Euskal Herria. He attacks criminals and other mean people. He also protects people by making them stay home when danger is near.
"Ahura Mazda" Persia An exalted divinity of ancient proto-Indo-Iranian religion that was subsequently declared by Zarathustra (Zoroaster) to be the one uncreated creator of all. Persia
"Ammon" Africa Originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, parts of Africa, and many parts of Greece. The real Egyptian name was Amun or Ammun.
"Aphaea" Greek Aka Britomartis, appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek
God name "Apis" Egyptian Apis the Bull of Memphis, is called the greatest of gods, and the god of all nations, while others regard him more in the light of a symbol of some great divinity. Egyptian
Nymph name "Arethusa" Greek One of the Nereid, and the nymph of the famous well, thus in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse. Alpheius reckons her among the Sicilian nymphs, and as the divinity who inspired pastoral poetry.
"Aristaeus" Greece An ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. He is described either as a son of Uranus and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius.
God name "Asclepius" Greek Or Aesculapius, the god of the medical art. In the Homeric poems Aesculapius does not appear to be considered as a divinity, but merely as a human being. No allusion is made to his descent, and he is merely mentioned as the the father of Machaon and Podaleirius.
God name "Ate" Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony), a daughter of Eris, and, according to Homer, of Zeus, was an ancient Greek divinity, who led both gods and men to rash and inconsiderate actions and to suffering.
"Atseatsan" Haudenosaunee First man and a solar divinity, He and his wife raise the Sun up into the heavens on long poles, since it is too hot to take hold of directly. Haudenosaunee
"Auxo 1" Greek One of the Horae. 2. An ancient Attic divinity, who was worshipped, according to Pausanias, together with Hegemone, under the name of Charites
Goddess name "Bellona" Greek The goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. Greek
Goddess name "Bellona" Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
Hero name "Belus" Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Goddess name "Bendis" Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.
Goddess name "Bod" Indian The divinity invoked by Indian women who desire fecundity. Children born after an invocation to Bod must be redeemed, or else serve in the temple of the goddess. Indian
"Bona Dea" Roman A Roman divinity, who is described as the sister, wife, or daughter of Faunus, and was herself called Fauna, Fatua, or Oma, worshipped at Rome from the earliest times as a chaste and prophetic divinity; and her worship was so exclusively confined to women.
"Britomartis" Greek Appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek
"Buto" Egypt An Egyptian divinity, whom the Greeks identified with their Leto, and who was worshipped principally in the town of Buto, which derived its name from her. Festivals were celebrated there in her honour, and there she had also an oracle which was in high esteem among the Egyptians. Egypt
Nymph name "Camenae" Roman Aka Casmenae, Carmenae Carmentis, prophetic nymphs. Two of the Camenae were Antevorta and Postvorta. The third was Carmenta or Carmentis, a prophetic and healing divinity. Roman
"Cephissus" Greek The divinity of the river Cephissus, is described as a son of Pontus and Thalassa, and the father of Diogeneia and Narcissus, who is therefore called Cephisius. Greek
"Chang Sien" Chinese A divinity worshipped by women desirous of offspring. Chinese
"Clementia" Roman A personification of Clemency, was worshipped as a divinity at Rome, especially in the time of the emperors. Roman
"Cotys" Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.
"Daeira" Greek the knowing, a divinity connected with the Eleusinian mysteries. A daughter of Oceanus, and became by Hermes the mother of Eleusis but others called her a sister of Styx. Greek
"Dictynna aka Britomartis" Cretan Originally a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden.
"Divus Pater Falacer" Italian An ancient and forgotten Italian divinity, considered to be the same as Jupiter.
"Doris" Greek A daughter of Oceanus and Thetys, and the wife of her brother Nereus, by whom she became the mother of the Nereides. (Theogony 240, Metamorphoses by Ovid ii. 269.) The Latin poets sometimes use the name of this marine divinity for the sea itself. Greek
"E" Mayan E. An agricultural divinity and the patron of maize and maize produce. Mayan
King name "Edusa aka Edulica" Cuba A Roman divinity, who was worshipped as the protectress of children, and was believed to bless their food, just as Potina and Cuba blessed their drinking and their sleep.
"Ekchuah" Mayan An agricultural divinity who is the Patron of cacao and cacao products. He also has associations with travelers and journeys. Mayan
God name "Epidotes" Greek A divinity who was worshipped at Lacedaemon, and averted the anger of Zeus Hicesius for the crime committed by Pausanias. Epidotes, which means the "liberal giver," occurs also as a surname of other divinities, such as Zeus at Mantineia and Sparta, of the god of sleep at Sicyon. Greek
"Falacer" Italian An ancient and forgotten Italian divinity, considered to be the same as Jupiter.
"Fascinus" Roman An early Latin divinity, and identical with Mutinus or Tutinus. He was worshipped as the protector from sorcery, witchcraft, and evil daemons and represented in the form of a phallus, the genuine Latin for which iafascimtm, this symbol being believed to be most efficient in averting all evil influences. He was especially invoked to protect women in childbed and their offspring.
"Februus" Roman An ancient Italian divinity, to whom the month of February was sacred, for in the latter half of that month great and general purifications and lustrations were celebrated, which were at the same time considered to produce fertility among men as well as beasts. Roman
"Fontus" Roman A Roman divinity connected with a well and he was the personification of the flowing waters.
"Fornax" Roman A divinity who presided over ovens. Roman
"Furina or Furrina" Roman An ancient Roman divinity, who had a sacred grove at Rome.
Goddess name "Gaomei" China Ancient goddess and first mother was called Kao Mi in the Ching Dynasty and was changed into a male divinity during the Japanese occupation. China
"Gohone" Haudenosaunee The divinity of Winter, and things associated with that season. Haudenosaunee
"Harihara" India Twin divinity composed of Visnu and Siva. India
"Hecate" Greek A mysterious divinity, who, according to the most common tradition, was a daughter of Persaeus or Perses and Asteria, whence she is called Perseis. Others describe her as a daughter of Zeus and Demeter, and state that she was sent out by her father in search of Persephone; others again make her a daughter of Zeus either by Pheraea or by Hera; and others, lastly, say that she was a daughter of Leto or Tartarus. Greek
God name "Hephaestus" Greek The god of fire, was, according to the Homeric account, the son of Zeus and Hera The Romans, when speaking of the Greek Hephaestus, call him Vulcan or Vulcanus, although Vulcanus was an original Italian divinity. Later traditions state that he had no father, and that Hera gave birth to him independent of Zeus, as she was jealous of Zeus having given birth to Athena independent of her. Greek
Hero name "Hera" Greek Probably identical with kera, mistress, just as her husband, Zeus, was called eppos in the Aeolian dialect. The derivation of the name has been attempted in a variety of ways, from Greek as well as oriental roots, though there is no reason for having recourse to the latter, as Hera is a purely Greek divinity, and one of the few who, according to Herodotus, were not introduced into Greece from Egypt. Greek
God name "Himerus or Phanes" Greek A mystic divinity in the system of the Orphics, is also called Eros, Ericapaeus, Himerus Metis, and Protogonus. He is said to have sprung from the mystic mundane egg, and to have been the father of all gods, and the creator of men. Phanes means "Manifestor" or "Revealer," and is related to the Greek words "light" and "to shine forth." Greek
Goddess name "Inanna" Mesopotamia Inana, the original "Holy Virgin," as the Sumerians called her, is the first known divinity associated with the planet Venus. This Sumerian goddess became identified with the Semitic goddesses Ishtar and later Astarte, Egyptian Isis, Greek Aphrodite, Etruscan Turan and the Roman Venus. Mesopotamia
"Kotys or Cotys" Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival, the Cotyttia resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.
"Libertas" Roman The personification of Liberty, was worshipped at Rome as a divinity. Roman
"Libitina" Italian An ancient Italian divinity, who was identified by the later Romans sometimes with Persephone on account of her connection with the dead and their burial, and sometimes with Aphrodite.
God name "Loki" Norse Loki. To end, finish; Loke is the end and consummation of divinity. The evil giant-god of the Norse mythology. He steers the ship Naglfar in Ragnarok. He borrows Freyja's feather-garb and accompanies Thor to the giant Thrym, who has stolen Thor's hammer. He is the father of Sleipner; also of the Midgard serpent, of the Fenris-wolf and of Hel. He causes Balder's death, abuses the gods in ?ger's feast, but is captured in Fraanangerforce and is bound by the gods. Norse
"Luperca" Roman Or Lupa, an ancient Italian divinity, the wife of Lupercus, who, in the shape of a she-wolf, performed the office of nurse to Romulus and Remus. Roman
"Lupercus" Roman An ancient Italian divinity, who was worshipped by shepherds as the protector of their flocks against wolves, and at the same time as the promoter of the fertility among sheep, whence he was called Inuus. Roman
"Magbabaya" Philippines The highest and most powerful divinity, the creator and the sources of all life. Philippines
King name "Magi" Christian According to Christian fable, were Melchior, Gaspar, and Balthazar, three kings of the East. The first offered gold, the emblem of royalty, to the infant Jesus; the second, frankincense, in token of divinity; and the third, myrrh, in prophetic allusion to the persecution unto death which awaited the "Man of Sorrows."
God name "Majestas" Roman A divinity worshipped at Rome. She is mentioned in connection with Vulcan, and was regarded by some as the wife of that god, though it seems for no other reason but because a priest of Vulcan offered a sacrifice to her on the first of May. Roman
"Mania" Etruscan An ancient and formidable Italian, probably Etruscan, divinity of the lower world, is called the mother of the Manes or Lares
Spirit name "Mania" Etruscan An ancient and formidable Italian, probably Etruscan, divinity of the lower world, is called the mother of the Manes or Lares. As regards her being the mother of the Manes or Lares, the idea seems to have been, that the souls of the departed on their arrival in the lower world became her children, and either there dwelt with her or ascended into the upper world as beneficent spirits.
God name "Mars" Roman An ancient Roman god, who was at an early period identified by the Romans with the Greek Ares, or the god delighting in bloody war, although there are a variety of indications that the Italian Mars was originally a divinity of a very different nature. Roman
"Mellonia" Roman A Roman divinity, who was believed to protect the honey, but is otherwise unknown.
"Mene" Greek A female divinity presiding over the months. Greek
"Menulis" Roman A Roman divinity who had a grove and temple in the Esquiliae, on a spot which it was thought fatal to enter.
"Nara-Narayana" Hindu Is broken down where Nara means human and Narayana means the Supreme divinity, or Vishnu. In the concept of Nara-Narayana, the human soul Nara is the eternal companion of the Divine Narayana. Hindu
Goddess name "Nascio" Roman A Roman divinity, presiding over the birth of children, and accordingly a goddess assisting Lucina in her functions, and analogous to the Greek Eileithyia. Roman
"Neptunus - Neptune" Roman The chief marine divinity of the Romans. His name is probably connected with the verb valu or nato, and a contraction of namtunus. As the early Romans were not a maritime people, and had not much to do with the sea, the marine divinities are not often mentioned, and we scarcely know with any certainty what day in the year was set apart as the festival of Neptunus, though it seems to have been the 23rd of July. Roman
Goddess name "Ninhursaga" Sumeria Mother divinity and goddess of wild animals, plants and fertility. Sumeria
"Nodotus" Roman A divinity presiding over the knots in the stem of plants producing grain but it seems more probable that originally it was only a surname of Saturnus. Roman
King name "Nortia" Etruscan An Etruscan divinity, who was worshipped at Volsinii, where a nail was driven every year into the wall of her temple, for the purpose of marking the number of years.
Hero name "Oetosyrus" Greek The name of a Scythian divinity whom Herodotus identifies with the Greek Apollo. (Herodotus, iv.) Greek
Spirit name "Okitsu-Hiko" Japanese Is a divinity in Japanese Shinto. His name literally translates to "Great Land Master", and he was originally the ruler of Izumo Province, until he was replaced by Ninigi. In compensation, he was made ruler of the unseen world of spirits and magic. He is believed a god of nation-building, farming, business and Medicine.
"Ops" Roman A female Roman divinity of plenty and fertility, as is indicated by her name, which is connected with opimus opulentus, inops, and copia. She was regarded as the wife of Saturnus, and, accordingly, as the protectress of every thing connected with Agriculture. Her abode was in the earth, and hence those who invoked her, or made vows to her, used to touch the ground, and as she was believed to give to human beings both their place of abode and their food, newly-born children were recommended to her care.
"Orbona" Roman A female Roman divinity, to whom an altar was erected at Rome, near the temple of the Lares in the Via Sacra. She was invoked by parents who had been deprived of their children, and desired to have others, and also in dangerous maladies of children. Roman
God name "Osiris" Egyptian The great Egyptian divinity, and husband of Isis. According to Herodotus they were the only divinities that were worshipped by all the Egyptians (Herodotus ii). Osiris is described as a son of Rhea and Helios. Osiris was the god of the Nile.
"Ossipaga" Roman Ossipanga, Ossilago, a Roman divinity, who was prayed to, to harden and strengthen the bones of infants.
Spirit name "Ostaraki" Buddhist spirit of divinity and wisdom. Buddhist
Hero name "Peitho" Greek The personification of Persuasion (Suada or Suadela among the Romans), was worshipped as a divinity at Sicyon, where she was honoured with a temple in the agora. (The History of Herodotus, VIII) Peitho also occurs as a surname of other divinities, such as Aphrodite, whose worship was said to have been introduced at Athens by Theseus and of Artemis. Greek
God name "Phanes" Greek A mystic divinity in the system of the Orphics, is also called Eros, Ericapaeus, Himerus Metis, and Protogonus. He is said to have sprung from the mystic mundane egg, and to have been the father of all gods, and the creator of men. Phanes means "Manifestor" or "Revealer," and is related to the Greek words "light" and "to shine forth." Phanes, or the personification of longing love, is first mentioned by Hesiod (Theogony 201), where he and Eros appear as the companions of Aphrodite. Greek
"Poeninus" Roman / Celtic The divinity of the Pennines, Britain. Roman / Celtic
"Pomona" Roman The Roman divinity of the fruit of trees, hence called Pomorum Patrona. Her name is evidently connected with Pomum. She is represented by the poets as having been beloved by several of the rustic divinities, such as Silvanus, Picus, Vertumnus, and others. Her worship must originally have been of considerable importance, as we learn from Varro that a special priest, under the name Pomonalis, was appointed to attend to her service. It is not impossible that Pomona may in reality be nothing but the personification of one of the attributes of Ops.
"Rediculus" Roman A Roman divinity who was believed to have received his name from having induced Hannibal, when he was near the gates of the city, to return southward. This divinity was probably one of the Lares of the city of Rome.
Goddess name "Redux" Greek I. e., "the divinity who leads the traveller back to his home in safety," occurs as a surname of Fortuna, the Greek goddess of good luck. Greek
Goddess name "Rhea" Greek Pefa, Pea, Pefy, or Pe. The name as well as the nature of this divinity is one of the most difficult points in ancient mythology. Some consider 'Pea' to be merely another form of pa, the earth, while others connect it with pew, I flow; but thus much seems undeniable, that Rhea, like Demeter, was a goddess of the earth. According to the Hesiodic Theogony, Rhea was a daughter of Uranus and Ge, and accordingly a sister of Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Crius, lapetus, Theia, Themis, and Mnemosyne. Greek
"Robigus" Greek A divinity worshipped for the purpose of averting blight or too great heat from the young cornfields. Greek
"Rusor" Roman A Roman divinity, was worshipped as one of the companions of Tellus, by which was personified the power of nature (the earth) of bringing forth to light the seeds entrusted to her.
"Sa" Babylonian The remote and inscrutable divinity of the cosmic deep. Babylonian
Nymph name "Sabazius" Phrygian A Phrygian divinity, commonly described as a son of Rhea or Cybele ; but in later times he was identified with the mystic Dionysus, who hence is sometimes called Dionysus Sabazius. For the same reason Sabazius is called a son of Zeus by Persephone, and is said to have been reared by a nymph Nyssa.
"Saiva" Sanskrit The divinity and patron of all yogis. Sanskrit
"Salacia" Greek The female divinity of the sea among the Romans, and the wife of Neptune.
God name "Sancus" Roman Sangus or Semo Sancus, a Roman divinity, is said to have been originally a Sabine god, and identical with Hercules and Dins Fidius. The name which is etymologically the same as Sanctus, and connected with Sancire, seems to justify this belief, and characterises Sancus as a divinity presiding over oaths.
"Sarapis" Egyptian Serapis, an Egyptian divinity, the worship of which was introduced into Greece in the time of the Ptolemies. Apollodorus (ii) states that Serapis was the name given to Apis after his death and deification.
"Segetia" Roman A Roman divinity, who, together with Setia or Seja and Semonia, was invoked by the early Italians at seed time.
Goddess name "Selene" Greek Also called Mene, a female divinity presiding over the months, or Latin Luna, was the goddess of the moon, or the moon personified into a Divine being. She is called a daughter of Hyperion and Theia, and accordingly a sister of Helios and Eos (Theogony 371 ; Apollodorus; Argonautica) ; but others speak of her as a daughter of Hyperion by Euryphaessa, or of Pallas, or of Zeus and Latona, or lastly of Helios. Greek
God name "Silvanus" Roman A Latin divinity of the fields and Forests, to whom in the very earliest times the Tyrrhenian Pelasgians are said to have dedicated a grove and a festival. He is described as a god watching over the fields and husbandmen, and is also called the protector of the boundaries of fields.
"Soma" Vedic A plant, ritual, intoxicating drink and divinity among Vedic and greater Persian cultures.
"Soteira" Greece The personification of safety or recovery was worshipped as a divinity in Greece, and had a Temple and a statue at Patrae.
"Stata Mater" Roman A Roman divinity, who is probably identical with Vesta.
"Summanus" Etruscan A derivative form from summus, the highest, an ancient Roman or Etruscan divinity, who was equal or even of higher rank than Jupiter
Goddess name "Syria Dea" De the Syrian goddess, a name by which the Syrian Astarte or Aphrodite is sometimes designated. This Astarte was a Syrian divinity, resembling in many points the Greek Aphrodite, and it is not improbable that the latter was originally the Syrian Astarte, the opinions concerning whom were modified after her introduction into Greece; for there can be no doubt that the worship of Aphrodite came from the East to Cyprus, and thence was carried into the south of Greece. Lucian, De Syria Dea
"Taureus" Greek A surname of Poseidon, given to him either because bulls were sacrificed to him, or because he was the divinity that gave green pasture to bulls on the sea-coast. Greek
"Telesphorus" Greek That is, "the completing," is the name of a medical divinity who is mentioned now and then in connection with Asclepius. Greek
"Terminus" Roman A Roman divinity presiding over boundaries and frontiers. His worship is said to have been instituted by Numa who ordered that every one should mark the boundaries of his landed property by stones to be consecrated to Jupiter, and at which every year sacrifices were to be offered at the festival of the Terminalia.
"Thanatos" Greek Latin Mors, a personification of death. In the Homeric poems death does not appear as a distinct divinity, though he is described as the brother of Sleep, together with whom he carries the body of Sarpedon from the field of battle to the country of the Lycians. Greek
"Tum" Egypt A primordial divinity issued from Nut. One of the main functions of Tum is generating the heavenly bodies and all celestial beings. Egypt
"Vacuna" Sabine A Sabine divinity identical with Victoria, the personification of victory.
God name "Veiovis" Etruscan Vedius, "little Jupiter" or "the destructive Jupiter," and identified with Pluto. But Veiovis seems to designate an Etruscan divinity of a destructive nature, whose fearful lightnings produced deafness in those who were to be struck by them, even before they were actually hurled. He was represented as a youthful god armed with arrows, and his festival fell before the nones of March.
Nymph name "Venilia" Roman A Roman divinity connected with the winds (venti) and the sea. Virgil and Ovid describe her as a nymph, a sister of Amata, and the wife of Faunus, by whom she became the mother of Turnus, Jutuma, and Canens. Aeneid x. Metamorphoses by Ovid xiv.)
God name "Vertumnus" Roman Is said to have been an Etruscan divinity whose worship was introduced at Rome by an ancient Vulsinian colony. The name signifies "the god who changes or metamorphoses himself." For this reason the Romans connected Vertumnus with all occurrences to which the verb verto applies, such as the change of seasons, purchase and sale, the return of rivers to their proper beds,etc. But in reality the god was connected only with the transformation of plants, and their progress from being in blossom to that of bearing fruit. Roman
"Vica Pota" Roman the Victor and Conqueror (quae vincit et potitur), was a Roman divinity of victory.
"Welchanos" Greek Minor divinity of vegetation and fertility. Greek
"Zam" Iranian The Indo-Iranian concept for "earth", prototyped as a chemical element in ancient philosophy, and as a minor divinity in Zoroastrianism and later Persian mythology.
Goddess name "Zu" Akkadian A lesser divinity of Akkadian mythology, and the son of the bird goddess Siris. Both Zu and Siris are seen as massive birds who can breathe fire and water, although Zu is alternately seen as a lion-headed eagle