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The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Egyptian"
NameOriginDescription
A Egypt / Greek A, among the Egyptians is denoted by the hieroglyphic which represents the ibis. Among the Greeks it was the symbol of a bad augury in the sacrifices.
Aah Egypt Moon god of the Egyptians.
Aahla Egyptian The Field of peace; a portion of Amenti the Egyptian underworld
Aam Egyptian A name for the god Tem, a form of the sun god in the city of Annu. The Book of the Dead associates Aam with the sun god Ra. Egyptian
Ahti Egyptian A goddess of evil
Ammon Africa Originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, parts of Africa, and many parts of Greece. The real Egyptian name was Amun or Ammun.
Amon Greek Commands forty legions, can appear in the form of a wolf with a serpent's tail and vomiting flames. In human form, he has the head of an owl and his beak shows canine teeth. He was the supreme diety of the Egyptians, who had blue skin in human form. Amon can tell of the past and the future, and reconcile the differences between friends.
Amun Egyptian An Egyptian deity who combined with the sun god to become Amun-Re, Amun was paramount in the Egyptian pantheon during the height of the pharaonic empire.
Apis Egyptian Apis the Bull of Memphis, is called the greatest of gods, and the god of all nations, while others regard him more in the light of a symbol of some great divinity. Egyptian
Aten Egypt The creator of the universe in ancient Egyptian mythology, usually regarded as a sun god represented by the sun's disk. Egypt
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Ba Egyptian One part of the ancient Egyptian concept of the soul which was imagined as a bird body with a human head.
Bacchis Egyptian A sacred bull which changed its colour every hour of the day. Egyptian
Buto Egypt An Egyptian divinity, whom the Greeks identified with their Leto, and who was worshipped principally in the town of Buto, which derived its name from her. Festivals were celebrated there in her honour, and there she had also an oracle which was in high esteem among the Egyptians. Egypt
Caligorant Egyptian An Egyptian giant and cannibal who used to entrap strangers with a hidden net. This net was made by Vulcan to catch Mars and Venus, Mercury stole it for the purpose of catching Chloris, and left it in the temple of Anubis; Caligorant stole it thence. At length Astolpho blew his magic horn, and the giant ran affrighted into his own net, which dragged him to the ground. Whereupon Astolpho made the giant his captive, and despoiled him of his net.
Canopus Egyptian The Egyptian god of water. The Chaldeans worshipped fire, and sent all the other gods a challenge, which was accepted by a priest of Canopus. The Chaldeans lighted a vast fire round the god Canopus, when the Egyptian deity spouted out torrents of water and quenched the fire, thereby obtaining the triumph of water over fire.
Cneph Egyptian An Egyptian Creator of the world.
Dedwin Nubian a god of riches & incense that was nailed by the Egyptians
Eloai Egypt Primordial being, one of the seven planetary spirits of the Egyptians
Enneads Egypt The Ancient Egyptians set up multiple Enneads; the Great Ennead, the Lesser Ennead, the Dual Ennead, plural Enneads, and the Seven Enneads.
Epaphos Greek The progenitor of the Egyptians
Gengenver Egyptian The goose who laid the Cosmic Egg. Egyptian
Hammon aka Ammon Libya An oracle god who had the shape of a ram. This was taken over by the Egyptians, who identified the god with their supreme god Amun; they called god of the oracle 'Amun of Siwa, lord of good counsel'. Libya
Har-pi-kruti Egyptian Form of the Egyptian god Horus, as a child sitting on his mother's knee.
Harmachis Greek Another form of the Egyptian god Horus
Haroeris Greek Another form of the Egyptian god Horus, but this time as an adult
Harpocrates Greek The Greek form of the Egyptian god Har-pi-kruti (Horus the Child), made by the Greeks and Romans the god of silence. This arose from a pure misapprehension. It is an Egyptian god, and was represented with its "finger on its mouth," to indicate youth, but the Greeks thought it was a symbol of silence. Greek
Harpokrates Greek Another form of the Egyptian god Horus, as a child sitting on his mother's knee
Heka aka Hike Egypt The deification of magic, his name being the egyptian word for magic. Heka literally means activating the Ka, which Egyptians thought was how magic worked. Egypt
Hermanubis Egyptian A god who combined Hermes with Anubis. He was popular during the period of Roman domination. Depicted as having a human body and jackal head, with the sacred caduceus that belonged to the Greek god Hermes, he represented the Egyptian priesthood.
Hike aka Heka Egypt The deification of magic, his name being the egyptian word for magic. Egypt
Horus Egyptian "The Mighty One of Transformations". Egyptian god, the son of Isis and Osiris. God of the all-seeing eye. His animal is the falcon.
Horus Egyptian The Egyptian day-god, represented in hieroglyphics by a sparrow-hawk, which bird was sacred to him. He was son of Osiris and Isis, but his birth being premature he was weak in the lower limbs. As a child he is seen carried in his mother's arms, wearing the pschent or atf, and seated on a lotus-flower with his finger on his lips. As an adult he is represented hawk-headed. Strictly speaking, Horus is the rising sun, Ra the noonday sun, and Osiris the setting sun.
Ibis or Nile-bird Egypt The Egyptians call the sacred Ibis Father John. It is the avatar' of the god Thoth, who in the guise of an Ibis escaped the pursuit of Typhon. The Egyptians say its white plumage symbolises the light of the sun, and its black neck the shadow of the moon, its body a heart, and its legs a triangle. It was said to drink only the purest of water, and its feathers to scare or even kill the crocodile. Egypt
Inanna Mesopotamia Inana, the original "Holy Virgin," as the Sumerians called her, is the first known divinity associated with the planet Venus. This Sumerian goddess became identified with the Semitic goddesses Ishtar and later Astarte, Egyptian Isis, Greek Aphrodite, Etruscan Turan and the Roman Venus. Mesopotamia
Inmutef Egyptian Egyptian bearer of the heavens.
Isa - Soma - Ulu'tuyar - Ulu Toyo'n - Uru'n Ajy Toyo'n Egyptian Ulu Toyo'n "Thou Beautiful Power, thou Beautiful Rudder of the Northern Heaven, Power of Heaven, From the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Ka Egyptian Egyptian name for the vital force of life.
Khnum Egypt Khnemu, one of the earliest Egyptian gods, originally the god of the source of the Nile River. Since the annual flooding of the Nile brought with it silt and clay, and its water brought life to its surrounds, he was thought to be the creator of human children, which he made at a potter's wheel, from clay, and placed in their mothers' wombs. He was later described as having molded the other gods, and he had the titles Divine Potter and Lord of created things from himself. Egypt
Khons Egyptian God of healing. Egyptian
Lotus Egypt The Egyptians pictured God sitting on a lote-tree, above the watery mud. Jamblichus says the leaves and fruit of the lote-tree being round represent "the motion of intellect;" its towering up through mud symbolises the eminency of divine intellect over matter; and the Deity sitting on the lote-tree implies His intellectual sovereignty. Egypt
Mundane Egg Egyptian In the Phoenician, Egyptian, Hindu, and Japanese systems, it is represented that the world was hatched from an egg. In some mythologies a bird is represented as laying the mundane egg on the primordial waters.
Mut Egypt An ancient Egyptian mother goddess with multiple aspects that changed over the centuries. Rulers of Egypt supported her worship in their own way to emphasize their own authority and right to rule. Egypt
Nefertem aka Nefertum Egypt Nefer-Tem, Nefer-Temu, the young Atum at the creation of the world had arisen from the primal waters. Since Atum was a solar deity, Nefertum represented sunrise, and since Atum had arisen from the primal waters in the bud of an Egyptian blue water-lily, Nefertum was associated with this flower. Egypt
Nun Egypt The name by which ancient Egyptians called both the mysterious underworld from where life was renewed and the primordeal god residing there.
Obiism Egyptian Serpent-worship. From Egyptian Ob (the sacred serpent). The African sorceress is still called Obi. The Greek ophis is of the same family. Moses forbade the Israelites to inquire of Ob, which we translate wizard.
Osiris Egyptian The great Egyptian divinity, and husband of Isis. According to Herodotus they were the only divinities that were worshipped by all the Egyptians (Herodotus ii). Osiris is described as a son of Rhea and Helios. Osiris was the god of the Nile.
Qebehsenuf Egyptian God whose canopic jar was used for the intestines. One of the four sons of Horus. Egyptian
Queen of Heaven Egyptian With the ancient Phoenicians was Astarte; Greeks, Hera; Romans, Juno; Trivia, Hecate, Diana, the Egyptian Isis, etc., were all so called; but with the Roman Catholics it is the Virgin Mary.
Sahu Egyptian The entity of the deceased in heaven which grew out of the dead body and was called into being by the ceremonies performed over the dead. Egyptian
Saitis Greek A surname of Athena, under which she had a sanctuary on Mount Pontinus, near Lerna in Argolis. The name was traced by the Greeks to the Egyptians, among whom Athena was said to have been called Sai's. Greek
Sarapis Egyptian Serapis, an Egyptian divinity, the worship of which was introduced into Greece in the time of the Ptolemies. Apollodorus (ii) states that Serapis was the name given to Apis after his death and deification.
Seb Egyptian One of the older Egyptian deities, the son of Shu and Tefnut, brother and husband of Nut, father of Osiris and Isis, Set and Nephthys.
Sebek Egyptian Sebeq or Sebeq-Ra, the crocodile-headed deity. In The Book of the Dead Sebek is named together with three other deities as dwelling on the mount of sunrise, helping Horus to be reborn daily. He is represented as giving the eyes to the deceased and assisting the pilgrim to be reborn. Egyptian
Seker Egyptian Seket. One of the aspects of Ptah, also the name of Osiris in Memphis, especially in his character of Lord of the Underworld. Egyptian
Sekhem Egyptian A shrine or sanctuary or the gods of the shrine. Egyptian
Sirius Greek The dog of Orion, who followed his master when he was made a constellation. The Dog-star or the Egyptian Sothis. Greek
Sulanuth Hebrew A monster in the sea ordered by God "to come up and go into Egypt, with arms ten cubits in length . . . and she went upon the roofs and uncovered the rafting and cut them and stretched forth her arm into the house and removed the lock and the bolt and opened the houses of Egypt and the swarm of animals destroyed the Egyptians" Book of Jasher
Sutekh Hurrian The prototype of the Egyptianized Set and an atmospheric or storm god. Hurrian
Taautos Phoenicia God who later devolved into the Egyptian Thoth. Phoenicia
Tahuti Egyptian God of knowledge and education. Egyptian
Taurt Egypt Rert or Rertu, hippopotamus goddess mentioned in the Judgment scene from The Egyptian Book of the Dead called the Eater of the Dead - the Devourer of the Unjustified. Egypt
The Ennead Egyptian Consists of a grouping of nine deities, most often appearing in the context of Egyptian mythology. As a three of threes, the number nine became associated with great carnal power, and ancient peoples considered groupings of nine Gods very important.
Theban Triad Egypt The three Egyptian gods that were the most powerful in the area of Thebes, in Egypt. The gods are Amun, his consort Mut and their son Khonsu.
Thermuthis Egyptian Egyptian fertility and harvest goddess.
Thoth Egypt Tchehuti or Tehuti. Author of the Book of the Dead was believed by the Egyptians to have been the heart and mind of the Creator, who was in very early times in Egypt called by the natives "Pautti," and by foreigners "Ra." Thoth was also the "tongue" of the Creator, and he at all times voiced the will of the great god, and spoke the words which commanded every being and thing in heaven and in earth to come into existence. His words were almighty and once uttered never remained without effect.
Thouris Egyptian Egyptian fertility goddess.
Tuat Egyptian Tiau, Tiaou. The region of the underworld or of the dead. Egyptian
Ulu'tuyar Egyptian "Thou Beautiful Power, thou Beautiful Rudder of the Northern Heaven, Power of Heaven, Opener of the Disk, thou Beautiful Rudder of the Northern Heaven" From the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Uru'n Ajy Toyo'n Egyptian "Thou Beautiful Power, thou Beautiful Rudder of the Northern Heaven, Power of Heaven, Opener of the Disk, thou Beautiful Rudder of the Northern Heaven" Egyptian Book of the Dead
Wepwawet Egyptian Jackal god of war and funerary cult leader. Egyptian