8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "H" - 767 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Hera/ Here"
Greek A goddess of childbirth, marriage, motherhood, of the sky, & storms
God name
"Herabe"
Huli God who causes insanity. Huli
Hero name
"Heracles"
Greek The most celebrated of all the heroes of antiquity. The traditions about him are not only the richest in substance, but also the most widely spread for we find them not only in all the countries round the Mediterranean, but his wondrous deeds were known in the most distant countries of the ancient world.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Here Ketit"
Egypt A lion headed goddess who breathes fire on the evil deceased
Spirit name
"Herensugue"
Basque Seven-headed snake shaped devil spirit. Basque
Goddess name
"Heret-Kau"
Egypt underworld goddess of the old kingdom Egypt
Goddess name
"Heret-Kau"
Egypt / Lower underworld goddess. Very little is known of Heret-Kau. She was recognized chiefly in the Old kingdom (27th to 22nd centuries BC), apparently concerned with guardianship of the deceased in the afterlife and sometimes appearing as a figurine in attendance on ISIS in building foundations....

"Herfoder"
Norse The father of hosts. A name of Odin. Norse
God name
"Herma"
Greek In ancient Greece, before his role as protector of merchants and travelers, Hermes was a phallic god, åśśociated with fertility, luck, roads and borders. His name comes from the word herma (plural hermai) referring to a square or rectangular pillar of stone, terracotta, or bronze; a bust of Hermes' head, usually with a beard, sat on the top of the pillar, and male genitals adorned the base. Greek
God name
"Hermanubis"
Egyptian A god who combined Hermes with Anubis. He was popular during the period of Roman domination. Depicted as having a human body and jackal head, with the sacred caduceus that belonged to the Greek god Hermes, he represented the Egyptian priesthood.

"Hermaphroditos"
Greek The name is compounded of Hermes and Aphrodite. He was originally a male Aphrodite (Aphroditus), and represented as a Hermes with the phallus, the symbol of fertility, but afterwards as a Divine being combining the two sexes, and usually with the head, breasts, and body of a female, but with the sexual parts of a man. Greek
Goddess name
"Hermaphroditos"
Greek God (Goddess) of uncertain status. The offspring of HERMES and APHRODITE and the lover of the water nymph Salmakis. Tradition has it that their påśśion for one another was so great that they merged into a single androgynous being....
God name
"Hermensul or Ermensul"
Christian A Saxon deity, worshipped in Westphalia. Charlemagne broke the idol, and converted its temple into a Christian church. Probably it was a war-god.
God name
"Hermes"
Greek A god of athletes, sport, gambling, commerce, communications, eloquence, luck, Medicine, oratory, roads, & wind
God name
"Hermes"
Greek A son of Zeus and Maia, the daughter of Atlas, was born in a cave of Mount Cyllene or in Olympus. In the first hours after his birth, he escaped from his cradle, went to Pieiria, and carried off some of the oxen of Apollo. The herald and messenger of the gods, of his travelling from place to place and the concluder of treaties and the promoter of social intercourse and of commerce among men. Regarded as the maintainer of peace, and as the god of roads, who protected travellers, and punished those who refused to åśśist travellers who had mistaken their way. Greek

"Hermione"
Greek The only daughter of Menelaus and Helena, and beautiful, like the golden Aphrodite. As she was a granddaughter of Leda, the mother of Helena Virgil calls her Ledaea. During the war against Troy, Menelaus promised her in marriage to Neoptolemus and after his return he fulfilled his promise. Greek
God name
"Hermod"
Norse Messenger god norse
God name
"Hermod"
Nordic / Icelandic Messenger god. One of the sons of the Wiking god OTHIN, he was sent to Hel on a mission to obtain the release of the god Balder, who had been slain by the blind god Hod. The mission failed because only one creature in the world, a hag (probably LOKI in disguise), failed to weep at Balder's loss and Hermod returned empty-handed. It may be argued that Hermod is less a deity than a demigod hero modeled on the Danish king of the Beowulf Saga. Also Heremod; Hermoth....

"Hermod [Courage of hosts]."
Norse Son of Odin, who gives him a helmet and a corselet. He rode on Sleipner to Hel to bring Balder back. Norse

"Hermotimus"
Grek Of Pedasa in Caria, fell, when a boy, into the hands of Panionius, a Chian, who made him a eunuch, and sold him to the Persians at Sardis.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.