8 ways to attend college for free
GodFinder
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z




List of Gods : "H" - 767 records

  1   ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24   ...   39
Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼

"Helen"
Greek A daughter of Zeus and Leda, and the sister of Polydeuces and Castor; some traditions called her a daughter of Zeus by Nemesis. She was of surpåśśing beauty, and is said to have in her youth been carried off by Theseus, in conjunction with Peirithous to Attica. When therefore Theseus was absent in Hades, Polydeuces and Castor (the Dioscuri) undertook an expedition to Attica. Athens was taken, Helena delivered, and Aethra, the mother of Theseus, was taken prisoner, and carried by the Dioscuri, as a slave of Helena, to Sparta. Greek
Goddess name
"Helen"
Helen is frequently alleged, in Homeric tradition, to have been a mortal heroine or a demigoddess Goddess [Greek] åśśociated with the city of Troy. In his Catalogues of Women Hesiod, the Greek contemporary of Homer and author of the definitive Theogony of the Greek pantheon, confounds tradition by making Helen the daughter of ZEUS and Ocean. Other Greek authors contemporary with Hesiod give Helen's mother as NEMESIS, the Greco-Roman goddess of justice and revenge, who was raped by Zeus. The mythology placing Helen as a demigoddess identifies her mother as Leda, the mortal wife of Tyndareus, also seduced by Zeus who fathered POLLUX as Helen's brother. However Hesiod strongly denied these claims. Homeric legend describes Helen's marriage to king Menelaus of Sparta and her subsequent abduction by Paris, said to have been the catalyst for the Trojan war. After her death, mythology generally places her among the stars with the Dioscuri (sons of Zeus), better known as Castor and Pollux, the twins of the Gemini constellation. Helen was revered on the island of Rhodes as the goddess Dendritis.See also DISKOURI....

"Helena"
Greek A daughter of Zeus and Leda, and the sister of Polydeuces and Castor; some traditions called her a daughter of Zeus by Nemesis. She was of surpåśśing beauty, and is said to have in her youth been carried off by Theseus, in conjunction with Peirithous to Attica. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Helene"
Greek A vegetation goddess, she is the one the Trojan war was fought over

"Helenos"
Greek The prophet, the only son of Priam that survived the fall of Troy. He fell to the share of Pyrrhos when the captives were awarded; and because he saved the life of the young Grecian was allowed to marry Andromache, his brother Hector's widow. (Virgil: ?neid.)

"Helgrind or Helgate"
Norse The gates of Hel. Norse

"Helheim"
Norse The abode of Hel. Norse
Goddess name
"Heli"
Germanic Goddess of death germanic
Goddess name
"Helia"
Greece A solar goddess, one of the Heliades: a daughter of Helios and sister of Phaethon. Greece

"Heliadae"
Greek The male and female descendants of Helios, and might accordingly be applied to all his children, but in mythology the name is given more particularly to the seven sons and the one daughter of Helios by Rhode or Rhodos. Their names are, Cercaphus, Actis, Macareus, Tanages, Triopas, Phaeton, Ochimus, and Electryone. Greek

"Helice"
Greek A daughter of Selinus, and the wife of Ion. The town of Helice, in Achaia, was believed to have derived its name from her.

"Helice"
Greek A daughter of Lycaon, was beloved by Zeus, but Hera, out of jealousy, metamorphosed her into a she-bear, whereupon Zeus placed her among the stars, under the name of the Great Northern Bear.

"Helicon"
Greece The Muses' Mount. It is part of the Parnåśśos, a mountain range in Greece.
God name
"Helios"
Greek In Greece the cult of Helios was very ancient and was practised throughout the land, at Elis, at Apollonia, on the Acropolis of Corinth, at Argos, at Troezen, on Cape Taenarum, at Athens, in Thrace and finally, and especially, in the island of Rhodes which was sacred to him. In Rhodes could be seen.the colossal statue of HeIios, the renowned work of the sculptor Chares. It was about thirty yards high, and ships in full sail could påśś between the god's legs. Greek
Hero name
"Hell"
Greek rivers of. Clåśśic authors tell us that the Inferno is encompåśśed by five rivers: Acheron, Cocytus, Styx, Phlegethon, and Lethe. Acheron from the Greek achos-reo, grief-flowing; Cocytus, from the Greek kokuo, to weep, supposed to be a flood of tears; Styx, from the Greek stugeo, to loathe; Phlegethon, from the Greek phleo to burn; and Lethe, from the Greek letle, oblivion.

"Hell Shoon"
Iceland In Icelandic mythology, indispensable for the journey to Valhalla as the obolus for crossing the Styx.
Goddess name
"Helle"
Greek Goddess of the sea Greek
Nymph name
"Hellen"
Greek A son of Deucalion and Pyrrha, or, according to others, a son of Zeus and Dorippe (Argonautica), or of Prometheus and Clymene, and a brother of Deucalion. By the nymph Orseis, that is, the mountain nymph, he became the father of Aeolus, Dorus, and Xuthus to whom some add Amphictyon. Greek
Spirit name
"Heloha"
Choctaw spirit[female] of thunder Choctaw
Goddess name
"Hemantadevi"
Buddhist Goddess of Winter Buddhist / Tibet
  1   ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24   ...   39

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.