8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Hera" - 135 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
King name
"Hylas"
Greek A son of Theiodamas, king of the Dryopes, by the nymph Menodice or a son of Heracles, Euphemus, or Ceyx. He was the favourite of Heracles, who, after having killed his father, Theiodamas, took him with him when he joined the expedition of the Argonauts. When the Argonauts landed on the coast of Mysia, Hylas went out to fetch water for Heracles but when he came to a well, his beauty excited the love of the Naiads, who drew him down into the water, and he was never seen again. Greek

"Iole"
Greek The last beloved of Heracles, and a daughter of Eurytus of Oechalia. According to some writers, she was a half-sister of Dryope.
Goddess name
"Iris (rainbow)"
Greek / Roman Messenger goddess. The special attendant of the goddess HERA, Iris is a virgin goddess who forms the Rainbow bridge between heaven and earth. Depicted with wings and carrying a staff....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Is”um"
Mesopotamian / BabylonianAkkadian Minor god. The brother of SAMAS', the Sun god, and an attendant of the plague god ERRA. He may have been a god of fire and, according to texts, led the gods in war as a herald but was nonetheless generally regarded as benevolent. Known particularly from the Babylonian legend of Erra and Is“um. Also ENDURSAGA....
Goddess name
"Juno"
Roman A Roman goddess of marriage and the long-suffering wife of Jupiter. Like her Greek equivalent, Hera, she was the protector of women, in particular married women. A festival took place in her honour on the calends (first) of March. Roman
Cyclop name
"Kronos or Cronus"
Greek A son of Uråñuś and Ge, and the youngest among the Titans. He was married to Rhea, by whom he became the father of Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus. Cheiron is also called a son of Cronus. At the instigation of his mother, Cronus unmanned his father for having thrown the Cyclopes, who were likewise his children by Ge, into Tartarus. Out of the blood thus shed sprang up the Erinnyes. Greek

"Ladon"
Greek The dragon who was believed to guard the apples of the Hesperides. He is said to have been able to åśśume various tones of voice, and to have been the offspring of Typhon and Echidna but he is also called a son of Ge, or of Phorcys and Ceto. He had been appointed to watch in the gardens of the Hesperides by Juno, and never slept; but he was slain by Heracles and the image of the fight was placed by Zeus among the stars. Greek
King name
"Lamia"
Greek A female phantom, by which children were frightened. According to tradition, she was originally a Libyan queen, of great beauty and a daughter of Belus. She was beloved by Zeus, and Hera in her jealousy robbed her of her children. Lamia, from revenge and despair, robbed others of their children, and murdered them; and the savage cruelty in which she now indulged rendered her ugly, and her face became fearfully distorted. Zeus gave her the power of taking her eyes out of her head, and putting them in again. Greek

"Leto"
Greek In Latin Latona, according to Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod), a daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe, a sister of Asteria, and the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus, to whom, she was married before Hera. Greek

"Lichas"
Greek An attendant of Heracles. He brought to his master the deadly garment, and as a punishment, was thrown by him into the sea, where the Lichadian islands, between Euboea and the coast of Locris, were believed to have derived their name from him. Greek

"Lityerses"
Greek Lived in Phrygia, engaged in rural pursuits, and hospitably received all strangers that påśśed his house, but he then compelled them to åśśist him in the harvest, and whenever they allowed themselves to be surpåśśed by him in their work, he cut off their heads in the evening, and concealed their bodies in the sheaves, accompanying his deed with songs. Heracles, however, slew him, and threw his body into the Maeander. Greek
Demon name
"Lybie and Lamia"
Greek Lybie was the mother of Lamia by Poseidon and as there are virtually no references to Lybie in clåśśical literature it seem likely that Lamia, Lybie and the Lamiae are all variations of the same myth concerning the beautiful queen of Libya, daughter of Belus and Libya. Lamia, in Greek mythology, queen of Libya. She was beloved by Zeus, and when Hera robbed her of her children out of jealousy, she killed every child she could get into her power. Hence Lamia came to mean a female bogey or demon, whose name was used by Greek mothers to frighten their children; from the Greek she påśśed into Roman demonology. Greek

"Mastor"
Greek Two mythical personages, one the father of Lycophron in Cythera, and the other the father of Halitherses in Ithaca.
God name
"Monoecus"
Greek A surname of Heracles, signifying the god who lives solitary, perhaps because he alone was worshipped in the temples dedicated to him. Greek

"Musaeus"
Greek A semi-mythological personage, to be clåśśed with Olen, Orpheus, and Pamphus. He was regarded as the author of various poetical compositions, especially as connected with the mystic rites of Demeter at Eleusis, over which the legend represented him as presiding in the time of Heracles. Greek
Hero name
"Oeolycus"
Greek A son of Theras of Sparta and brother of Aegeus, was honoured at Sparta with an heroum. Greek
God name
"Ogdoad"
Egypt Primordial forces. The elements of chaos, eight in number, which existed before the creation of the Sun god and which are known from Khemnu in Middle Egypt (Greek Heliopolis). The Ogdoad also had a sanctuary at Medinet Habu. They created, out of themselves rather than by sexual coupling, the mound which emerged from the primeval waters and upon which rested the egg from which the young Sun god emerged. They are usually depicted as baboons heralding the Sun as it rises. They are grouped in pairs and include NUN and NAUNET representing the primordial abyss, KEK and KAUKET representing darkness, HEH and HAUHET representing infinity, and AMUN and AMAUNET representing hidden power....
Spirit name
"Olokun"
Africa The patron orisa of the descendants of Africans that were carried away during the Maafa, the Transatlantic Slave Trade or Middle Påśśage. Olokun works closely with Oya, deity of Sudden Change, and Egungun, Collective Ancestral spirits, to herald the way for those that påśś to ancestorship, as it plays a critical role in death (Iku), Life and the transition of human beings and spirits between these two existences.
King name
"Omphale"
Greek A daughter of the Lydian king Jardåñuś, and wife of Tmolus, after whose death she undertook the government herself. When Heracles, in consequence of the murder of Iphitus, was ill of a serious disease, and received the oracle that he could not be released unless he served some one for wages for the space of three years, Hermes, accordingly, sold Heracles to Omphale, by whom he became the father of several children. Greek
Monster name
"Opinicus"
Arabic A fabulous monster, composed of dragon, camel, and lion, used in heraldry. It forms the crest of the Barber Surgeons of London.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.