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The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Abou"
NameOriginDescription
Abou Jahia Arab The angel of death in Mohammedan mythology. Called Azrael by the Arabs, and Mordad by the Persians.
Abou-Bekr Arab Called Father of the Virgin, i.e. , Mahomet's favourite wife. He was the first caliph, and was founder of the sect called the Sunnites.
Aboulomri Arab A fabulous bird of the vulture sort which lives 1,000 years. Called by the Persians Kerkes, and by the Turks Ak-Baba. Mohammedan mythology
Adam was buried Arabia According to Arabian tradition, on Aboucais, a mountain of Arabia.
Adroa Africa A god of the Lugbara people of central Africa. Adroa has two aspects: one good and one evil. He is the creator of Heaven and Earth, and he appears to those about to die. Adroa is depicted as a tall, white man with only half a body – one eye, one arm, one leg, one ear. Africa
Aengus Celtic/ Irish worshipped from about 500 BC/ 400 AD
Agdistis Phrygian A mythical being connected with the Phrygian worship of Attes or Atys. Pausanias relates the following story about Agdistis. On one occasion Zeus unwittingly begot by the Earth a superhuman being which was at once man and woman, and was called Agdistis. The gods dreaded it and unmanned it, and from its severed genitalia there grew up an almond-tree.
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Antiope Greece A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus, Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb.
Ares Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.
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Auchimalgen Chile Moon goddess, wife of the sun. Only Auchimalgen cares anything for the human race, all the rest of the gods being utterly malevolent. Auchimalgen wards off evil spirits and turns red when some important person is about to die. Chile
Bactrian Sage Zoroaster Zoroaster A native of Bactria, about 500 BCE.
Belus Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Bozaloshtsh Wendish A messenger of death who cries like a child outside a house where someone is about to die. Wendish
Briseis Greek A patronymic from Briseus, and the name of Hippodameia, the daughter of Briseus of Lyrnessus, who fell into the hands of Achilles, and about whom the quarrel arose between Achilles and Agamemnon. Greek
Christmas Decorations Christian The great feast of Saturn was held in December, when the people decorated the temples with such green things as they could find. The Christian custom is the same but transferred Jesus. The holly or holy-tree is called Christ's-thorn in Germany and Scandinavia, from its use in church decorations and its putting forth its berries about Christmas time. The early Christians gave an emblematic turn to the custom, referring to the "righteous branch," and justifying the custom from Isaiah lx. 13- "The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee; the fir-tree, the pine-tree, and the box together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary."
Corpse Bird Whales "derwyn corph" the phantom of a bird that sits on a windowsill and taps on the glass when someone is about to die. Whales
Daffodil Greek/Roman Or "Lent Lily," was once white; but Persephone, daughter of Demeter, delighted to wander about the flowery meadows of Sicily. One spring, throwing herself on the grass, she fell asleep. The god of the Infernal Regions, Pluto, fell in love with the beautiful maid, and carried her off for his bride. His touch turned the white flowers to a golden yellow, and some of them fell in Acheron, where they grew luxuriantly; and ever since the flower has been planted on graves. Greek/Roman
Daphne Greek A fair maiden who is mixed up with various traditions about Apollo. According to Pausanias she was an Oreas and an ancient priestess of the Delphic oracle to which she had been appointed by Ge. Diodorus describes her as the daughter of Teiresias, who is better known by the name of Manto. Greek
Dewden aka Dedun Nubian A Nubian god worshipped since at least 2400BC. There is much uncertainty about his original nature, especially since he was depicted as a lion, but the earliest known information indicates that he had become a god of incense.
Dusara Semitic Local god associated with vegetation and fertility survived until about 500 BCE. Semitic
Egil Scandinavian Brother of Weland, the Vulcan of Northern mythology. Egil was a great archer, and his tale is the exact counterpart of the famous fable about William Tell.
Eris Greek Born of Ate and Zeus, or, according to Homer, Hera and Zeus (Iliad IV), she is the goddess who calls forth war and discord. According to the Iliad, she wanders about, at first small and insignificant, but she soon raises her head up to heaven (IV). Greek
Erymanthean Greek A devastating boar which wandered about in Arcadia. Its capture was one of the labours of Hercules. Greek
Eternal Jew / Wandering Jew. Christian The Jew who hurried on Jesus Christ when he was led to crucifixion. As a punishment, he is compelled to wander about the world, homeless and restless, till the Day of Judgment. Christian
Eurypylus Greek A son of Euaemon and Ops. He appears in the different traditions about him, as a hero of Ormenion, or Hyria, or as a king of Cyrene. Greek
Gabamiah Germany Recite the following words: "Gabamiah, Adonay, Agla, O Lord God of Powers, do Thou assist us!" When you see the angel, say in an affable tone of voice: "Blessed Spirit, be thou welcome! I conjure thee once more, in the Name of the Most Holy Adonay, to give me prompt enlightenment about stuff. And if for reasons unknown to us, thou art unwilling to proceed in an audible tone of voice, I conjure thee in the Most Holy Name of Adonay to write upon the virgin parchment here present, between now and to-morrow morning, or at least reveal unto me that which I desire this coming might in my sleep. Solonic goetic rite.
Gorge Greek A daughter of Oeneus and Althaea, and the wife of Andraemon. When Artemis metamorphosed her sisters into birds, on account of their unceasing lamentations about their brother Meleager, Gorge and Deianeira alone were spared. Greek
Gremory Roman A strong Duke of Hell who tells all things past, present and future, about hidden treasures, and procures the love of women, young and old, but especially maidens.
Guabonito Haiti The sea goddess who teaches people about medicines & health
Helios Greek In Greece the cult of Helios was very ancient and was practised throughout the land, at Elis, at Apollonia, on the Acropolis of Corinth, at Argos, at Troezen, on Cape Taenarum, at Athens, in Thrace and finally, and especially, in the island of Rhodes which was sacred to him. In Rhodes could be seen.the colossal statue of HeIios, the renowned work of the sculptor Chares. It was about thirty yards high, and ships in full sail could pass between the god's legs. Greek
Heracles Greek The most celebrated of all the heroes of antiquity. The traditions about him are not only the richest in substance, but also the most widely spread for we find them not only in all the countries round the Mediterranean, but his wondrous deeds were known in the most distant countries of the ancient world.
Hogfather Europian The Discworld's version of Father Christmas or Santa Claus. He wears a red, fur-lined cloak, and rides a sleigh pulled by four wild boars, Gouger, Rooter, Tusker and Snouter. In earlier times he gave households pork products, and naughty children a bag of bloody bones. Earlier than that, he was a winter god of the death-and-renewal kind. The modern version is a jolly toymaker, with vestiges of the earlier myths (such as his Castle of Bones, a vast palace of ice which has nothing notably bony about it, except for the suggestion of a protruding femur or scapula here and there) still clinging to him.
Icarius Greek Also called Icarus and Icarion. An Athenian, who lived in the reign of Pandion, and hospitably received Dionysus on his arrival in Attica. The god showed him his gratitude by teaching him the cultivation of the vine, and giving him bags filled with wine. Icarius now rode about in a chariot, and distributed the precious gifts of the god; but some shepherds whom their friends intoxicated with wine, and who thought that they were poisoned by Icarius, slew him, and threw his body into the well Anygrus, or buried it under a tree. Greek
Itonius Greek Itonia, Itonias, Itonis or Itonius, a surname of Athena, derived from the town of Iton, in the south of Phthiotis. The goddess there had a celebrated sanctuary and festivals, and is hence also called Incolaltoni. From Iton her worship spread into Boeotia and the country about lake Copais, where the Pamboeotia was celebrated, in the neighbourhood of a temple and grove of Athena. Greek
Juggernaut or Jaggernaut Crow The Hindu god Jagganath. The word is a corruption of the Sanscrit jagannatha (lord of the world). The temple of this god is in a town of the same name in Orissa. King Ayeen Akbery sent a learned Brahman to look out a site for a temple. The Brahman wandered about for many days, and then saw a crow dive into the water, and having washed, made obeisance to the element. This was selected as the site of the temple. While the temple was a-building the rajah had a prophetic dream, telling him that the true form of Vishnu should be revealed to him in the morning. When the rajah went to see the temple he beheld a log of wood in the water, and this log he accepted as the realisation of his dream, enshrined it in the temple, and called it Jagannath.
Kederli George The St. George of Mahometan mythology. He slew a monstrous dragon to save a damsel exposed to its fury, and, having drunk of the water of life, rode about the world to aid those warriors who invoked him.
Kikimora Slavic Female house spirit and counterpart of the Domovoi, to whom she is sometimes wedded. She lives in the cellar or behind the stove. At night she comes out to spin and help with the housework in a well-tended home. She is depicted as an average woman with hair undone, sometimes with chicken feet. Sometimes she might appear, spinning, as a portend to one about to die. Slavic
Kud Korea The Caca and in embodiment of the evil principal that abound in the world
Laocoon Greek A Trojan hero, who plays a prominent part in the post-Homeric legends about Troy: a son of Priam, famous for the tragic fate of himself and his two sons, who were crushed to death by serpents. Greek
Marpessa Greek A daughter of Evenus and Alcippe. She was the wife of Idas and became by him the mother of Cleopatra, or Alcyone, wife of Meleager. Their daughter was called Alcyone because Marpessa was once carried off by Apollo, and lamented over the separation from her beloved husband, as Alcyon had once wept about Ceyx. Greek
Melusina France Having enclosed her father in a high mountain for offending her mother, she was condemned to become every Saturday a serpent from her waist downward. When she married Raymond, Count of Lusignan, she made her husband vow never to visit her on a Saturday; but, the jealousy of the count being excited, he hid himself on one of the forbidden days, and saw his wife's transformation. Melusina was now obliged to quit her mortal husband, and was destined to wander about as a spectre till the day of doom. Some say the count immured her in the dungeon of his castle. France
Mithras Roman About the time of the Roman emperors his worship was introduced at Rome, and thence spread over all parts of the wearing the Phrygian cap and attire, and kneeling on a bull which is thrown on the ground, and whose throat he is cutting. The bull is at the same time attacked by a dog, a serpent, and a scorpion. This group appears frequently among ancient works of art. Roman
Mizu-Ha-No-Me Japan/ Shinto The senior water goddess who came about from the urine of the primordial creator goddess
Mlk-Amuklos Syria/ Palestine/ Cyprus A heroic god known from about 1100 B.C.E.
Morva signifies Locus Maritimus Britain Morva signifies Locus Maritimus. Sea-women and sea-daughters. "The fishermen who were the ancestors of the Church, came from the Galilean waters to haul for men. We, born to God at the font, are children of the water. Therefore, all the early symbolism of the Church was of and from the sea. The carvure of the early arches was taken from the sea and its creatures. Fish, dolphins, mermen, and mermaids abound in the early types, transferred to wood and stone."' Cornwall, Britain
Munkar and Nakir Arabic Two black angels of appalling aspect, the inquisitors of the dead. The Koran says that during the inquisition the soul is united to the body. If the scrutiny is satisfactory, the soul is gently drawn forth from the lips of the deceased, and the body is left to repose in peace; if not, the body is beaten about the head with iron clubs, and the soul is wrenched forth by racking torments.
Murcury Greek The name Mercury is connected with the root merx (merchandise) and mercari (to deal, trade). The early Romans, being above all countrymen, had no need for a god of commerce. The Roman Mercury appeared only about the fifth century BCE. and was exclusively the god of merchants. For long he was known only in this capacity so that Plautus, in his prologue to Amphitryon, reminds his audience that Mercury presided over messages and commerce. Like certain other minor divinities - Pecunia, Aesculanus, Argentinus - he watched over tradesmen's profits. Greek
Nakeer and Munkar Arabic Two black angels of appalling aspect, the inquisitors of the dead. The Koran says that during the inquisition the soul is united to the body. If the scrutiny is satisfactory, the soul is gently drawn forth from the lips of the deceased, and the body is left to repose in peace; if not, the body is beaten about the head with iron clubs, and the soul is wrenched forth by racking torments.
Nindara Nijin Who gives advice on the rooftops; you who among powerful lords are, who among rulers hold the staff, a shepherd who oversees the teeming people; who strides about the city's squares by night at the middle of the watch; you who open the gates at daybreak, who make their doors stand open onto the street: you have great divine powers, more than anyone could require. Nijin
Ninmenta Sumeria Ninmenta was stunned at these words of the Anzu chick. Ninmenta gave out a wail: 'And what about me? These me have not fallen into my hand. I shall not exercise their lordship. I shall not live like him in the shrine, in the abzu.' Father Enki in the abzu knew what had been said. Sumeria
Niobe Greek 1. A daughter of Phoroneus, and by Zeus the mother of Argus and Pelasgus. In other traditions she is called the mother of Phoroneus and wife of Inachus. 2. A daughter of Tantalus by the Pleiad Taygete or the Hyad Dione, or, according to others, a daughter of Pelops and the wife of Zethus or Alalcomeneus, while Parthenius relates quite a different story, for he makes her a daughter of Assaon and the wife of Philottus, and relates that she entered into a dispute with Leto about the beauty of their respective children. Greek
Obassi Nsi Ekoi One of the two creator gods. He decided to live on the earth and taught the first humans about planting crops and hunting for food. Ekoi
Orehu Peru A woman sent by the god Arawanili to teach the Arawaks about religion. Peru
Paradise Lost Milton Satan rouses the panic-stricken host of fallen angels to tell them about a rumour current in Heaven of a new world about to be created. He calls a council to deliberate what should be done, and they agree to send Satan to search out for the new world. Satan, passing the gulf between Hell and Heaven and the limbo of Vanity, enters the orb of the Sun (in the guise of an angel) to make inquiries as to the new planet's whereabouts; and, having obtained the necessary information, alights on Mount Niphates, and goes to Paradise in the form of a cormorant. Seating himself on the Tree of Life, he overhears Adam and Eve talking about the prohibition made by God, and at once resolves upon the nature of his attack. Gabriel sends two angels to watch over the bower of Paradise, and Satan flees. Raphael is sent to warn Adam of his danger, and tells him the story of Satan's revolt and expulsion out of Heaven, and why and how this world was made. After a time Satan returns to Paradise in the form of a mist, and, entering the serpent, induces Eve to eat of the forbidden fruit. Adam eats "that he may perish with the woman whom he loved." Satan returns to Hell to tell his triumph, and Michael is sent to lead the guilty pair out of the garden. Milton
Paris Greek Also called Alexander, was the second son of Priam and Hecabe. Previous to his birth Hecabe dreamed that she had given birth to a firebrand, the flames of which spread over the whole city. This dream was interpreted to her by Aesacus, or according to others by Cassandra, by Apollo, or by a Sibyl, and was said to indicate that Hecabe should give birth to a son, who should bring about the ruin of his native city, and she was accordingly advised to expose the child. Greek
Ph?dria Lake Handmaid of Acrasia the enchantress. She sails about Idle Lake in a gondola. Seeing Sir Guyon she ferries him across the lake to the floating island, where Cymochles attacks him. Ph?dria interposes, the combatants desist, and the little wanton ferries the knight Temperance over the lake again. Fairy Tale
Pradyumna Hindu A son of Krishna and Rukmini who, as a baby, was abducted by the demon Sambara and cast into the sea and swallowed by a fish. The fish was caught and opened and the child was found inside. He was given to a woman in Sambara's house to raise. Narada informed her about the true identity of the child. When Pradyumna grew up, he battled the demon Sambara, defeated him. Pradyumna was later killed in a drunken brawl in his father's court at Dwaraka. Hindu
Proserpine's Divine Calidore Roman Sleep. In the beautiful legend of Cupid and Psyche, by Apuleius, after Psyche had long wandered about searching for her lost Cupid, she is sent to Prosperine for "the casket of divine beauty," which she was not to open till she came into the light of day. Psyche received the casket, but just as she was about to step on earth, she thought how much more Cupid would love her if she was divinely beautiful; so she opened the casket and found the calidore it contained was sleep, which instantly filled all her limbs with drowsiness, and she slept as it were the sleep of death. Roman
Psycarpax [granary thief] Lake Son of Troxartas, King of the Mice. The Frogking offered to carry the young prince over a lake, but scarcely had he got midway when a water-hydra appeared, and King Frog, to save himself, dived under water. The mouse, being thus left on the surface, was drowned, and this catastrophe brought about the battle of the Frogs and Mice.
Santoshi Mata Hindu Mother goddess of recent origin, about 1960 Hindu
Sarpedon Greek 1. A son of Zeus by Europa, and a brother of Minos and Rhadamanthys. Being involved in a quarrel with Minos about Miletus, he took refuge with Cilix, whom he assisted against the Lycians and afterwards he became king of the Lycians, and Zeus granted him the privilege of living three generations.
Tara Vedic Soma, the moon, carried Tara off with him, which brought about the great war in heaven between the gods and the asuras. Brahma put an end to the war and had Tara restored to Brihaspati.
Tethys Greek A Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. She was mother of the chief rivers of the universe, such as the Nile, the Alpheus, the Maeander, and about three thousand daughters called the Oceanids. Greek
Thebes Greek An ancient city of Egypt of great renown, once capital of Upper Egypt; covered 10 sq. m. of the valley of the Nile on both sides of the river, 300 m. SE. of Cairo; now represented by imposing ruins of temples, palaces, tombs, and statues of colossal size, amid which the humble dwellings of four villages-Luxor, Karnack, Medinet Habu, and Kurna-have been raised. The period of its greatest flourishing extended from about 1600 to 1100 B.C., but some of its ruins have been dated as far back as 2500 B.C. Greek
Vampire Europe An extortioner. The vampire is a dead man who returns in body and soul from the other world, and wanders about the earth doing mischief to the living. He sucks the blood of persons asleep, and these persons become vampires in turn. Middle Europe
Vedma Slavic Goddess on a broomstick who causes storms, keeps the water of life and death, and knows all about herbs. She can appear either young and beautiful or old and ugly. Slavic
Werwolf Europe Werewolf. A bogie who roams about devouring infants, sometimes under the form of a man, sometimes as a wolf followed by dogs, sometimes as a white dog, sometimes as a black goat, and occasionally invisible. Its skin is bullet-proof, unless the bullet has been blessed in a chapel dedicated to St. Hubert. This superstition was once common to almost all Europe, and still lingers in Brittany, Limousin, Aurergne, Servia, Wallachia, and White Russia. In the fifteenth century a council of theologians, convoked by the Emperor Sigismund, gravely decided that the Werwolf was a reality.
Wild Huntsman German The German tradition is that a spectral hunter with dogs frequents the Black Forest to chase the wild animals. The English name is "Herne the Hunter," who was once a keeper in Windsor Forest. In winter time, at midnight, he walks about Herne's Oak, and blasts trees and cattle. He wears horns, and rattles a chain in a "most hideous manner". Another legend is that a certain Jew would not suffer Jesus to drink out of a horse-trough, but pointed to some water in a hoof-print as good enough for "such an enemy of Moses," and that this man is the "Wild Huntsman." Various
Wraith Scotland The ghost of a person shortly about to die or just dead, which appears to survivors, sometimes at a great distance off. Scotland
Yumboes African Fairies of African mythology, about two feet high, of a white colour, and dressed like the people of Jaloff. Their favourite haunt is the range of hills called The Paps.
Zara-ma-yha-who Aboriginal A little red man, about 4 feet tall, with a large head and mouth. The tips of the fingers and toes were shaped like the suckers of an octopus. They lived in wild fig trees and capture their prey by dropping on passers-by. A Zara-ma-yha-who might jump on top of the person and drain their blood with their hands and feet. Their victims rarely died from the initial encounter, but because the person was left in a weak and helpless state, the yara-ma-yha-who would return later and swallow the victim. It then drank water and took a nap. When it awoke, it would regurgitate the undigested portion of its meal, which, if the meal was a person, that person would still be alive. Aboriginal