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List of Gods : "Beli"
NameOriginDescription
Adamida Christian A planet on which reside the unborn spirits of saints, martyrs, and believers. U'riel, the angel of the sun, was ordered at the crucifixion to interpose this planet between the sun and the earth, so as to produce a total eclipse. Early Christian
Adibuddha Buddhist The primeval buddha, is believed to be the primordial cosmic force from which the five dhyanibuddhas arose. This is the embodiment of the concept of emptiness.
Agrotera Greek The huntress, a surname of Artemis. At Agrae on the Ilissus, where she was believed to have first hunted after her arrival from Delos, Artemis Agrotera had a temple with a statue carrying a bow. Greek
Aino Japan The name Fuji is believed to be derived from "Huchi" or "Fuchi", the words for the Aino Goddess of Fire. Japan
Aisha aka A'ishah Islamic Ayesha, A'isha, or Aisha, "she who lives", was a wife of Muhammad. In Islamic writings, she is thus often referred to by the title "Mother of the Believers"
Amathes Greek A son of Heracles, from whom the town of Amathus in Cyprus was believed to have derived its name.
Ame-No-Tanabata-Hime-No-Mikoto Japan/Shinto Star god identified with the Pole-star, is believed to guard the land and to prevent disasters, and more particularly to cure eye-diseases. Japan/Shinto
Amoghapasa Buddhist Brings believers hope and tranquility. Amoghapasa has four pairs of arms. One pair is held with palms together in a prayerful attitude. Some are raised, others are held slightly away from the body. The hands may be in symbolic positions called mudra or may hold symbolic articles like a lotus blossom, symbol of compassion; a monk's staff; a whisk representing the brushing away of earthly cares; and the lasso. Buddhist
Among the Yoruba Africa / Nigeria Aja also refer to a "wild wind". It's believed that if someone is carried away by aja, and then returns,he becomes a powerful "jujuman". The journey supposedly will have a duration of between seven days to three months, and the person so carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven (0run).
Aon Greek A son of Poseidon, and an ancient Boeotian hero, from whom the Boeotian Aonians and the country of Boeotia (for Boeotia was anciently called Aonia) were believed to have derived their names.
Araethyrea Greek A daughter of Aras, an autochthon who was believed to have built Arantea, the most ancient town in Phliasia. She had a brother called Aoris, and is said to have been fond of the chase and warlike pursuits. When she died, her brother called the country of Phliasia after her Araethyrea.
Arne (Metamorphoses) 1. A daughter of Aeolus, from whom the Boeotian town Arne, afterwards called Chaeroneia, as well as the Thessalian Arne, were believed to have derived their name. 2. A woman who betrayed her native country for gold, and was therefore metamorphosed into a jackdaw. (Metamorphoses)
Asia Greek 1. A surname of Athena in Colchis. Her worship was believed to have been brought from thence by Castor and Polydeuces to Laconia, where a temple was built to her at Las. 2. A daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, who became by Japetus the mother of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. (Theogony of Hesiod 359.) According to some traditions the continent of Asia derived its name from her.
Atthis Greek Or Attis, a daughter of Cranaus, from whom Attica, which was before called Actaea, was believed to have derived its name. The two birds into which Philomele and her sister Procne were metamorphosed, were likewise called Attis.
Azan Greece A son of Ares and the nymph Erato, was the brother of Apheidas and Elatus, and father of Cleitor. The part of Arcadia which he received from his father was called, after him, Azania. After his death, funeral games, which were believed to have been the first in Greece, were celebrated in his honour.
Baiamai Australia He is considered by some to be the creator. Others believe he created his son, Burambin, who then created the world. Australia
Banshee Ireland Grey Lady of Death who haunts certain Irish families. A female spirit in Gaelic folklore believed to presage, by wailing, a death in a family. Ireland
Begoe Etruscan An Etruscan nymph, who was believed to have written the Ars fulguritarum, the art of purifying places which had been struck by lightning. This religious book was kept at Rome in the temple of Apollo together with the Sibylline books and the Carmina of the Marcii.
Bel Akkadian Bel became especially used of the Babylonian god Marduk and when found in Assyrian and neo-Babylonian personal names or mentioned in inscriptions in Mesoptamian context it can usually be taken as referring to Marduk and no other god. Similarly Belit without some disambiguation mostly refers to Bel Marduk's spouse Sarpanit. However Marduk's mother, the Sumerian goddess called Ninhursag, Ningal and Ninmah and other names in Sumerian, was often known as Belit-ili 'Lady of the Gods' in Akkadian.
Bel Babylonian Signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian religion. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek and Latin by Belos and Belus respectively. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic Ba‘al with the same meaning.
Belet-Seri/ Belitsari Babylon/ Akkadia The underworld goddess that kept track of the dead coming through
Beli aka Bele Norse A giant, brother of Gerd, who was slain by Frey. Norse
Belili Mesopotamia Goddess of the moon Mesopotamia
Belisama Gaul A goddess of crafts & the forge
Belisama Gaul Goddess connected with lakes and rivers, fire, crafts and light. Identified with Minerva/Athena and has been compared with Brigid. Gaul
Belit Ilani Babylon Mistress of the gods. Evening Star of Desire. Babylon
Belit Seri Babylon Goddess of justice and fairness. She kept the records of human activities. Babylon
Belit-Ili Babylon/Akkadia Mother goddess, the mother of Enlil. Babylon/Akkadia
Belus Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Bibi the Child-Strangler Bibi Sometimes affectionately known as "Aunty Bibi," is a Romany witch-goddess. Bibi is an old crone who either wears torn black garments or is entirely naked. Like the Romanian goddess Dschuma, Bibi is disease incarnate, particularly cholera. She is referred to as "the child-strangler" because it is believed that disease often effects children, who are young and weak.
Binzuru-Sonja Japan One of the pupils of Buddha, the first of the Sixteen Rakan. Rakan with grey hair and long eyebrows. Originally he was a retainer of the king, Uuten. He became a priest and attained miracle power by performing Arakan’s vow. It is said that he was praised by Shaka for he used the miracle power for the world and that he didn't enter Nirvana and made efforts cultivating ordinary people. He was worshipped on the above in Theravada Buddhism, however, many are worshipped in restaurants in China. He is enshrined in front of a temple in Japan. It is believed that stroking him eliminates distresses. Japan
Bogeyman Scotland Boogyman, or bogyman, is a legendary ghost-like monster often believed in by children. The bogeyman has no specific appearance. The term bogeyman is also used metaphorically to mean a person or thing of which someone else has an irrational fear.
Bubilas Lithuania A household god of bees. Later hypothetical reconstructions say that people sacrificed honey for Bubilas. People believed that doing so would make bees swarm better. Bubilas is the husband of Austeja. Lithuania
Bubilas Lithuanian A household god of bees. Later hypothetical reconstructions say that people sacrificed honey for Bubilas. People believed that doing so would make bees swarm better. Bubilas is the husband of Austeja. Lithuanian
Byzas Greek A son of Poseidon and Ceroessa, the daughter of Zeus and Io. He was believed to be the founder of Byzantium. Greek
Cacodaemons Greek Minor deities, one of whom it was believed was attached to each mortal from his birth as a constant companion and acting as a sort of messenger between the gods and men.
Cacus Greek A fabulous Italian shepherd, brother of Caca, who was believed to have lived in a cave, and to have committed various kinds of robberies. Among others, he also stole a part of the cattle of Hercules or Recaranus and, as he dragged the animals into his cave by their tails, it was impossible to discover their traces. But when the remaining oxen passed by the cave, those within began to bellow, and were thus discovered. Greek
Cakra Hindu Is thought to be a nexus of metaphysical and/or biophysical energy residing in the human body. The New Age movement, and to some degree the distinctly different New Thought movement, have also adopted and elaborated on this belief. Hindu
Candybus Greek A son of Deucalion, from whom Candyba, a town in Lycia, was believed to have received its name. Greek
Canola Ireland Believed to be one of the oldest of the Ireland deities. Ireland
Castalia Greek Nymph of the Castalian spring at the foot of mount Parnassus. She was regarded as a daughter of Achelous and was believed to have thrown herself into the well when pursued by Apollo. Greek
Celedones Greek The soothing goddesses were believed to be endowed, like the Sirens, with a magic power of song. Hephaestus was said to have made their golden images on the ceiling of the temple at Delphi. Greek
Cghene Nigeria The supreme God of the Isoko people in southern Nigeria. He is believed to have created the world and all peoples, including the Isoko. Cghene is beyond human comprehension and is only known by his actions. Because the God is so distant and unknown he has no temples or priests, and no prayers or sacrifices are offered directly to him.
Charopus Greek Or Charops, bright-eyed or joyful-looking, a surname of Heracles, under which he had a statue near mount Laphystion on the spot where he was believed to have brought forth Cerberus from the lower world. Greek
Cirrha Greek A nymph from whom the town of Cirrha in Phocis was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Cithaeron Greek A mythical king in Boeotia, from whom mount Cithaeron was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Cleone Greek Goddess of water. One of the daughters of Asopus, from whom the town of Cleonae in Peloponnesus was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Cranaus Greek An autochthon and king of Attica, who reigned at the time of the flood of Deucalion. He was married to Pedias, by whom he became the father of Cranae, Cranaechme, and Atthis, from the last of whom Attica was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Cromus Greek A son of Poseidon, from whom Cromyon in the territory of Corinth was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Devi Russia Giants, usually believed to be evil beings. Russia
Dodon Greek A son of Zeus by Europa, from whom the oracle of Dodona was believed to have derived its name. Other traditions traced the name to a nymph of the name of Dodone. Greek
Dvergr Norse A dwarf. In modern Icelandic lore dwarfs disappear, but remain in local names, as Dverga-steinn, and in several words and phrases. From the belief that dwarfs lived in rocks an echo is called dwerg-mal (dwarf talk), and dwerg-mala means to echo. The dwarfs were skilled in metal-working. Norse
Dysponteus aka Dyspontius Greek A son of Oenomaus or Pelops, believed to be the founder of the town of Dyspontium, in Pisatis. Greek
Echtghe Ireland Believed to be another form of Dana, the first Great Mother Goddess of Ireland.
Edusa aka Edulica Cuba A Roman divinity, who was worshipped as the protectress of children, and was believed to bless their food, just as Potina and Cuba blessed their drinking and their sleep.
Empusa Greek A monstrous spectre, which was believed to devour human beings. It could assume different forms, and was sent out by Hecate to frighten travellers. It was believed usually to appear with one leg of brass and the other of an ass. Whenever a traveller addressed the monster with insulting words, it used to flee and utter a shrill sound. The Lamiae and Mormolyceia, who assumed the fonm of handsome women for the purpose of attracting young men, and then sucked their blood like vampyrs and ate their flesh, were reckoned among the Empusae. Greek
Eros Greek In Latin, Amor or Cupido, the god of love. In the sense in which he is usually conceived, Eros is the creature of the later Greek poets; and in order to understand the ancients properly we must distinguish three Erotes: viz. the Eros of the ancient cosmogonies, the Eros of the philosophers and mysteries, who bears great resemblance to the first, and the Eros whom we meet with in the epigrammatic and erotic poets, whose witty and playful descriptions of the god, however, can scarcely be considered as a part of the ancient religious belief of the Greeks. Greek
Errata Discworld The Goddess of Misunderstandings. This little known goddess was the cause of the Tsortean Wars; not, as most people believe, Elenor. Understandably not the most liked goddess, Errata wasn't invited to many weddings. Discworld
Fascinus Roman An early Latin divinity, and identical with Mutinus or Tutinus. He was worshipped as the protector from sorcery, witchcraft, and evil daemons and represented in the form of a phallus, the genuine Latin for which iafascimtm, this symbol being believed to be most efficient in averting all evil influences. He was especially invoked to protect women in childbed and their offspring.
Fravasi or Fravartin Iran Denotes the spirit of the pre-existence of the believer who watches over him as Protective spirit. Iran
Fravasi/ Fravartin Iran Interesting - The concept denotes the spirit of the pre-existence of the believer that watches over him as a protective spirit
Glipzo Discworld The Howondalandish tribe of this Goddess believed that their ancestors resided in the Moon. After a signal from their ancestors they were urged to kill anyone who didn't believe in Glipzo. Three years later the tribe was destroyed by a rock falling out of the sky, as a result of a star exploding a billion years before. Discworld
God of Evolution Discworld Is found 'sculpting' animals and since he hasn't figured out reproduction yet, he makes every animal unique. Although no-one believes in the God of Evolution, he survives thanks to his own strong belief. He does not believe in himself, because he is an atheist, but he believes in what he does. Discworld
Golgus Greek A son of Adonis and Aphrodite, from whom the town of Golgi, in Cyprus, was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Haemon Greek 1. A son of Pelasgus and father of Thessalus. The ancient name of Thessaly, viz. Haemonia, or Aemonia, was believed to have been derived from him.
Harpina Greek A daughter of Asopus, from whom the town of Harpina or Harpinna in Elis was believed to have derived its name. She became by Ares the mother of Oenomaus. Greek
Hekenjuk Eskimo "My people call the sun Hekenjuk. We believe she is the sister of the moon, Taktik. They share the same house but visit the sky at different times. There is always one coming when one is going away." The Ihalmiut Eskimo
Helice Greek A daughter of Selinus, and the wife of Ion. The town of Helice, in Achaia, was believed to have derived its name from her.
Houri Koran The large blackeyed damsels of Paradise, possessed of perpetual youth and beauty, whose virginity is renewable at pleasure. Every believer will have seventy-two of these houris in Paradise, and his intercourse with them will be fruitful or otherwise, according to his wish. If an offspring is desired, it will grow to full estate in an hour. (Persian, huri; Arabic, huriya, nymphs of paradise. Koran
Huchi Japan Goddess of fire and of volcanic eruptions. The name Fuji is believed to be derived from "Huchi" or "Fuchi", the words for the Aino Goddess of Fire. Japan
Immat Islam Ensures the balance between the shariah or the exoteric aspect of the faith, and its esoteric, spiritual essence. Neither the exoteric nor the esoteric obliterates the other. While the Imam is the path to a believer's inward, spiritual elevation, he is also the authority who makes the shariah relevant according to the needs of time and universe. Islam
Italus Italy An ancient king of the Pelasgians, Siculians, or Oenotrians, from whom Italy was believed to have derived its name.
Jesus aka Iesous Christian Joshua, Yehoshua, Yeshua. Another Son of God, the second person in the Trinity of Jehovah, and the source of Christian belief.
Knaritja Australia The earth and the sky had always existed and had always been the home of Supernatural Beings. The western Aranda believe that the sky is inhabited by an emu-footed Great Father (Knaritja), who is also the Eternal Youth (altjira nditja). He has dog-footed wives and many sons and daughters. "They lived on fruits and vegetable foods in an eternally green land, unaffected by droughts, through which the Milky Way flowed like a broad river...".' They have an Eden-like place where only trees, fruits and flowers flourish. All these sky-dwellers are seen as ageless and beyond death. The Aranda, Australia
Koolukoolwani Africa "It is agreed among the Zoolus, that their forefathers believed in the existence of an overruling spirit, whom they called Villenangi [Umvelinqangi] (literally the First Appearer), and who soon after created another heavenly being of great power, called Koolukoolwani, [Unkulunkulwana,] who once visited this earth, in order to publish the news (as they express it), as also to separate the sexes and colours among mankind. Duling the period he was below, two messages were sent to him from Villenangi, the first conveyed by a cameleon, announcing that men were not to die; the second, by a lizard, with a contrary decision. The lizard, having outrun the slow-paced cameleon, arrived first, and delivered his message before the latter made his apperance." Amazulu, South Africa
Kun Lun Chinese The Kunlun mountains are well known in Chinese mythology and are believed to be Taoist paradise. The first to visit this paradise was King Mu. He supposedly discovered there the Jade Palace of Huang-Di, the mythical Yellow Emperor and originator of Chinese culture, and met Hsi Wang Mu, the 'Spirit Mother of the West' usually called the 'Queen Mother of the West', who was the object of an ancient religious cult which reached its peak in the Han Dynasty, also had her mythical abode in these mountains.
Lactanus Greek Lactans, Lacturnus, and Lacturcia, Lactura, Roman divinities, who were believed to protect the young fruits of the field. Some believe that Lactans and Lacturcia are mere surnames of Ops, and that Lacturnus is a surname of Saturnus. Greek
Ladon Greek The dragon who was believed to guard the apples of the Hesperides. He is said to have been able to assume various tones of voice, and to have been the offspring of Typhon and Echidna but he is also called a son of Ge, or of Phorcys and Ceto. He had been appointed to watch in the gardens of the Hesperides by Juno, and never slept; but he was slain by Heracles and the image of the fight was placed by Zeus among the stars. Greek
Lemures Greek Spectres or spirits of the dead, which were believed by the Romans to return to the upper world and injure the living. Some writers describe Lemures as the common name for all the spirits of the dead and divide all Lemures into two classes; viz. the souls of those who have been good men are said to become Lares, while those of the wicked become Larvae. Greek
Lethe Greek The personification of oblivion, is called by Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 227) a daughter of Strife. Lethe is one of the rivers of Hades. Drinking from the river Lethe caused complete forgetfulness. Some ancient Greeks believed that souls were made to drink from the river before being reincarnated, so they would not remember their past lives. Greek
Libystnus Greek That is, the Libyan, a surname under which Apollo was worshipped by the Sicilians, because he was believed to have destroyed by a pestilence a Libyan fleet which sailed against Sicily. Greek
Lichas Greek An attendant of Heracles. He brought to his master the deadly garment, and as a punishment, was thrown by him into the sea, where the Lichadian islands, between Euboea and the coast of Locris, were believed to have derived their name from him. Greek
Limnaea Greek Limnetes, Limnades, Limnegenes, i. e. inhabiting or born in a lake or marsh, is a surname of several divinities who were believed either to have sprung from a lake, or had their temples near a lake. Instances are, Dionysus at Athens, and Artemis at Sicyon, near Epidaurus, on the frontiers between Laconia and Messenia, near Calamae, at Tegea, Patrae; it is also used as a surname of nymphs that dwell in lakes or marshes. Greek
Little-Endians Swift The two great empires of Lilliput and Blefuscu waged a destructive war against each other, exhausted their treasures, and decimated their subjects on their different views of interpreting this vital direction contained in the 54th chapter of the Blun-decral: "All true believers break their eggs at the convenient end." The godfather of Calin Deffar Plane, the reigning emperor of Lilliput, happened to cut his finger while breaking his egg at the big end, and very royally published a decree commanding all his liege and faithful subjects, on pains and penalties of great severity, to break their eggs in future at the small end. The orthodox Blefuscudians deemed it their duty to resent this innovation, and declared a war of extermination against the heretical Lilliputians. Swift
Lur Basques Lurbira. Earth mother of the Sun and of the Moon. One of the main spirits of the beliefs and mythical traditions of the Basques.
Lycoreus or Lycoris Greek 2 A son of Apollo and the nymph Corycia, from whom Lycoreia, in the neighbourhood of Delphi, was believed to have derived its name. There are two other mythical personages of this name.
Lyterius Roman I. e. the Deliverer, a surname of Pan, under which he had a sanctuary at Troezene, because he was believed during a plague to have revealed in dreams the proper remedy against the disease. Roman
Macedon Greek A son of Zeus and Thyia, and a brother of Magnes, from whom Macedonia was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Magic Rings Italy This superstition arose from the belief that magicians had the power of imprisoning demons in rings. The power was supposed to prevail in Asia, and subsequently in Salamanca, Toledo, and Italy.
Manannan Manx Is believed to have three legs and his form of walking was to roll in a circular motion on his three legs like a wheel in order to get from place to place. Manx
Mathonwy Welsh A benevolent ruler of the underworld akin to Beli, or perhaps that god himself under another title, for the name Math. Welsh
Mellonia Roman A Roman divinity, who was believed to protect the honey, but is otherwise unknown.
Merrow Irish A mermaid, believed by Irish fishermen to forebode a coming storm. There are male merrows, but no word to designate them.
Metabus Greek A son of Sisyphus, from whom the town of Metapontum, in Southern Italy, was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Mimas2 Italy A giant who is said to have been killed by Ares, or by Zeus with a flash of lightning. The island of Prochyte, near Sicily, was believed to rest upon his body.
Mutinus or Mutunus Roman That is, the phallus, or Priapus, which was believed to be the most powerful averter of demons, and of all evil that resulted from pride and boastfulness, and the like. Roman
Nahual Aztec From the Nahuatl word nahualli which was used to refer to practicioners of harmful magic. In the aztec belief system the day of a persons birth caluclated in the Tonalpohualli would determine the nature of the person - each day was associated with an animal which could have a strong or weak aspect.
Nahuti Ollin Tonatiuh Aztec ("Movement of the Sun") was the sun god. The Aztec people considered him the leader of Tollan, their heaven. He was also known as the fifth sun, because the Aztecs believed that he was the sun that took over when the fourth sun was expelled from the sky. Aztec
Nixi Dii Roman A general term, which seems to have been applied by the Romans to those divinities who were believed to assist women at the time when they were giving birth to a child. Before the cella of Minerva, on the Capitol, there were three statues, which were designated as Dii Nixi. Roman
Nudd or Lud Lludd Llaw Eraint Welsh Nudd or Lud Lludd Llaw Eraint, "Lludd of the Silver Hand", son of Beli Mawr, a legendary hero. Welsh
Nymphae Greek The name of a numerous class of inferior female divinities, though they are designated by the title of Olympian, are called to the meetings of the gods in Olympus, and described as the daughters of Zeus. But they were believed to dwell on earth in groves, on the summits of mountains, in rivers, streams, glens, and grottoes. Greek
Nysa Greek A daughter of Aristaeus, who was believed to have brought up the infant god Dionysus, and from whom one of the many towns of the name of Nysa was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Oetylus Greek A son of Amphianax, and grandson of Antimachus of Argos. The Laconian town of Oetylus was believed to have received its name from him, and he there enjoyed heroic honours. Greek
Okitsu-Hiko Japanese Is a divinity in Japanese Shinto. His name literally translates to "Great Land Master", and he was originally the ruler of Izumo Province, until he was replaced by Ninigi. In compensation, he was made ruler of the unseen world of spirits and magic. He is believed a god of nation-building, farming, business and medicine.
Ops Roman A female Roman divinity of plenty and fertility, as is indicated by her name, which is connected with opimus opulentus, inops, and copia. She was regarded as the wife of Saturnus, and, accordingly, as the protectress of every thing connected with agriculture. Her abode was in the earth, and hence those who invoked her, or made vows to her, used to touch the ground, and as she was believed to give to human beings both their place of abode and their food, newly-born children were recommended to her care.
Orneus Greek A son of Erechtheus, father of Peteus, and grandfather of Menestheus; from him the town of Orneae was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Paradise of Fools Roman The Hindus, Mahometans, Scandinavians, and Roman Catholics have devised a place between Paradise and "Purgatory" to get rid of a theological difficulty. If there is no sin without intention, then infants and idiots cannot commit sin, and if they die cannot be consigned to the purgatory of evil-doers; but, not being believers or good-doers, they cannot be placed with the saints. The Roman Catholics place them in the Paradise of Infants and the Paradise of Fools.
Parvati Hindu A Hindu goddess. She is the wife of Lord Shiva and the divine mother of Lord Ganesh and Lord Murugan. Some communities also believe her to be the divine sister of Lord Vishnu
Pegasus Greek The famous winged horse, whose origin is thus related. When Perseus struck off the head of Medusa, with whom Poseidon had had intercourse in the form of a horse or a bird, there sprang forth from her Chrysaor and the horse Pegasus. The latter obtained the name Pegasus because he was believed to have made his appearance near the sources of Oceanus. Greek
Phegeus Greek A brother of Phoroneus, and king of Psophis in Arcadia. The town of Phegeia, which had before been called Erymanthus, was believed to have derived its name from him. Subsequently, however, it was changed again into Psophis. Greek
Pheres Greek 1. A son of Cretheus and Tyro, and brother of Aeson and Amythaon; he was married to Periclymene, by whom he became the father of Admetus, Lycurgus, Eidomene, and Periapis. He was believed to have founded the town of Pherae in Thessaly.
Purgatory Jewish The Jewish Rabbi believed that the soul of the deceased was consigned to a sort of purgatory for twelve months after death, during which time it was allowed to visit its dead body and the places or persons it especially loved. This intermediate state they called by various names, as "the bosom of Abraham," "the garden of Eden," "upper Gehenna." The Sabbath was always a free day, and prayer was supposed to benefit those in this intermediate state.
Rediculus Roman A Roman divinity who was believed to have received his name from having induced Hannibal, when he was near the gates of the city, to return southward. This divinity was probably one of the Lares of the city of Rome.
Rhodos Greek A sea-nymph, according to Diodorus, a daughter of Poseidon and Halia, and sometimes called Rhode. The island of Rhodes was believed to have derived its name from her. Greek
Rhoeteia Greek A daughter of the Thracian king Sithon and Achiroe, a daughter of Neilos. She was a sister of Pallene, and the Trojan promontory of Rhoeteium was believed to have derived its name from her. Greek
Rubanga Sudan Creator god and it was believed that the best way of praying to God was through spirits of dead relatives. At harvest time, the first harvest must be offered to the spirits to thank them for successfully interceding to God on behalf of the living. Madi, Sudan
Sai' Al Quan Nabataean/ W Semitic A local guardian God is believed to be the protector of caravans
Salamander Greek The nature spirits of fire, the fire elementals. The Greek salamandra was believed to have power over fire.
Sancus Roman Sangus or Semo Sancus, a Roman divinity, is said to have been originally a Sabine god, and identical with Hercules and Dins Fidius. The name which is etymologically the same as Sanctus, and connected with Sancire, seems to justify this belief, and characterises Sancus as a divinity presiding over oaths.
Sirens Greek Mythical beings who were believed to have the power of enchanting and charming, by their song, any one who heard them. When Odysseus, in his wanderings through the Mediterranean, came near the island on the lovely beach of which the Sirens were sitting, and endeavouring to allure him and his companions, he, on the advice of Circe, stuffed the ears of his companions with wax, and tied himself to the mast of his vessel, until he was so far off that he could no longer hear their song. Greek
Sparta Greek A daughter of Eurotas by Clete, and wife of Lacedaemon, by whom she became the mother of Amyclas and Eurydice. From her the city of Sparta was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Sparti s "the sown men;" the armed men who sprang from the dragon's teeth sown by Cadmus, and were believed to be the ancestors of the five oldest families at Thebes.
Staphylus Greek A son of Dionysus and Ariadne, or of Theseus and Ariadne, was one of the Argonauts (Apollodorus i). By Chrysothemis he became the father of three daughters, Molpadia, Rhoeo, and Parthenos. Rhoeo was beloved by Apollo, and Staphylus, believing that she was with child by some one else, locked her up in a chest and threw her into the sea. Greek
Syamatara Buddhist Goddess, believed to be incarnated as the Nepali princess. Buddhist
Tacita Greek "the silent," one of the Camenae, whose worship was believed to have been introduced at Rome by Numa. Greek
Tamti Assyrian Tamtu. The personified sea,the primordial humidity, personified as a goddess equivalent to Belit, the Nature Mother. Assyrian
Targitaus Greek A son of Zeus by a daughter of Borysthenes, was believed to be the ancestor of all the Scythians. Greek
Taurica Greece "the Taurian goddess," commonly called Artemis. Her image was believed to have been carried from Tauris by Orestes and Iphigenia, and to have been conveyed to Brauron, Sparta, or Aricia. The worship of this Taurian goddess, who was identified with Artemis and Iphigenia, was carried on with orgiastic rites and human sacrifices, and seems to have been very ancient in Greece.
Thallo Greek One of the Attic Home, who was believed to grant prosperity to the young shoots of plants, and was also invoked in the political oath which the citizens of Athens had to take. Greek
Thebe Greek 1. A daughter of Prometheus, from whom the Boeotian Thebes was believed to have derived its name.
Thero Sparta 1. The nurse of Ares, from whom he was believed to have received the surname of Thereitas, though Pausanias thinks that this name arose from the fierceness of the god. A sanctuary of Ares Thereitas stood on the road from Sparta to Therapne, with a statue which the Dioscuri were said to have brought from Colchis.
Thessalus Greek 1. A son of Haemon, from whom Thessaly was believed to have received its name.
Thoth Egypt Tchehuti or Tehuti. Author of the Book of the Dead was believed by the Egyptians to have been the heart and mind of the Creator, who was in very early times in Egypt called by the natives "Pautti," and by foreigners "Ra." Thoth was also the "tongue" of the Creator, and he at all times voiced the will of the great god, and spoke the words which commanded every being and thing in heaven and in earth to come into existence. His words were almighty and once uttered never remained without effect.
Thriae Greek The name of three prophetic nymphs on Mount Parnassus, by whom Apollo was reared, and who were believed to have invented the art of prophecy by means of little stones, which were thrown into an urn. Greek
Unicorn Europian According to a belief once popular, the unicorn by dipping its horn into a liquid could detect whether or not it contained poison. In the designs for gold and silver plate made for the Emperor Rudolph II. by Ottavio Strada is a cup on which a unicorn stands as if to essay the liquid.
Unkulunkulu Zulu The creator god and great ancestral spirit of the Zulu people. Unkulunkulu is believed to have grown on a reed in the mythical swamp of Uhlanga. Zulu
Veen Finnish The Water Mother, a spirit believed to rule the waters and their bounty. Finnish
Vesta Roman Was the goddess of the hearth, and therefore inseparably connected with the Penates, for Aeneas was believed to have brought the eternal fire of Vesta from Troy, along with the images of the Penates. The praetors, consuls, and dictators, before entering upon their official functions, sacrificed not only to the Penates, but also to Vesta at Lavinium. (The Aeneid by Virgil. Book II)
Veteema Estonian The Water Mother, a spirit believed to rule the waters and their bounty. Estonian
Wadd Greek The Minaean moon god. Snakes were believed to be sacred to him.
Yulgen Central Asia According to the belief of the Altaians, the good spirits,aru neme, are all subjects of the good god Yulgen, and the bad spirits, kara neme, of the evil god Erlik. Yulgen is so kind and generous that he never does harm to men. Sacrifices are offered to him by all, but no one fears him. Every bridegroom must sacrifice to him a horse of a light colour after his marriage.
Zalmoxis Greek A legendary social and religious reformer, regarded as the only true god by the Thracian Dacians. According to Herodotus (IV), the Getae, who believed in the immortality of the soul, looked upon death merely as going to Zalmoxis, as they knew the way to become immortals. Greek