8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Beli" - 192 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"AEGIR (water)"
Icelandic / Nordic God of the ocean. A lesser known AESIR god of Asgard concerned with the moods of the sea and their implications for mariners. The river Eider was known to the Vikings as “Aegir's Door.” Aegir is also depicted in some poetry as the “ale brewer,” perhaps an allusion to the caldrons of mead which were thought to come from under the sea (see also the Celtic deities DAGDA and GOBNIU). There are references in literature to Saxons sacrificing captives, probably to Aegir, before setting sail for home. Linked in uncertain manner to the goddess RAN he was believed to have sired nine children, the waves of the sea, who were possibly giantesses....
God name
"Abello aka Abelio and Abelionni"
Enoch Abello aka Abelio and Abelionni, was a god of apple trees, worshipped in the Garonne Valley in southwest France.
Planet name
"Adamida"
Christian A planet on which reside the unborn spirits of saints, martyrs, and believers. U'riel, the angel of the Sun, was ordered at the crucifixion to interpose this planet between the Sun and the earth, so as to produce a total eclipse. Early Christian
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Adibuddha"
Buddhist The primeval buddha, is believed to be the primordial cosmic force from which the five dhyanibuddhas arose. This is the embodiment of the concept of emptiness.

"Agrotera"
Greek The huntress, a surname of Artemis. At Agrae on the Ilissus, where she was believed to have first hunted after her arrival from Delos, Artemis Agrotera had a temple with a statue carrying a bow. Greek
Goddess name
"Aino"
Japan The name Fuji is believed to be derived from "Huchi" or "Fuchi", the words for the Aino Goddess of Fire. Japan

"Aisha aka A'ishah"
Islamic Ayesha, A'isha, or Aisha, "she who lives", was a wife of Muhammad. In Islamic writings, she is thus often referred to by the title "Mother of the Believers"

"Amathes"
Greek A son of Heracles, from whom the town of Amathus in Cyprus was believed to have derived its name.
God name
"Ame-No-Tanabata-Hime-No-Mikoto"
Japan / Shinto Star god identified with the Pole-star, is believed to guard the land and to prevent disasters, and more particularly to cure eye-diseases. Japan / Shinto

"Amoghapasa"
Buddhist Brings believers hope and tranquility. Amoghapasa has four pairs of arms. One pair is held with palms together in a prayerful attitude. Some are raised, others are held slightly away from the body. The hands may be in symbolic positions called mudra or may hold symbolic articles like a lotus blossom, symbol of compåśśion; a monk's staff; a whisk representing the brushing away of earthly cares; and the låśśo. Buddhist

"Among the Yoruba"
Africa / Nigeria Aja also refer to a "wild wind";. It's believed that if someone is carried away by aja, and then returns,he becomes a powerful "jujuman". The journey supposedly will have a duration of between seven days to three months, and the person so carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven (0run).
Spirit name
"Anjea"
Australasia Animistic fertility spirit. Known to tribesmen on the Pennefather River, queensland, Australia and believed to place mud babies in the wombs of pregnant women. The grandmother of a newly born infant buried the afterbirth, which was collected by Anjea and kept in a hollow tree or some such sanctuary until the time came to instill it into another child in the womb....
Goddess name
"Anna Kmari"
Indian Local vegetation goddess. Worshiped by the Oraon tribe of Chota Nagpur. The recipient of human sacrifice in the spring months, she was believed to endow riches on the sacrificer and to ensure plentiful harvest while living in his house in the form of a child....
Hero name
"Aon"
Greek A son of Poseidon, and an ancient Boeotian hero, from whom the Boeotian Aonians and the country of Boeotia (for Boeotia was anciently called Aonia) were believed to have derived their names.

"Araethyrea"
Greek A daughter of Aras, an autochthon who was believed to have built Arantea, the most ancient town in Phliasia. She had a brother called Aoris, and is said to have been fond of the chase and warlike pursuits. When she died, her brother called the country of Phliasia after her Araethyrea.
Goddess name
"Arianrhod"
Celtic / Welsh Chthonic earth goddess. Responsible for initiation of souls in the otherworld in the tower of Caer Sidi. Mentioned in the Mabinogion texts as the possible daughter of Beli, consort of DON and mother of LLEW LLAW GYFFES and Dylan....

"Arne"
Metamorphoses 1. A daughter of Aeolus, from whom the Boeotian town Arne, afterwards called Chaeroneia, as well as the Thessalian Arne, were believed to have derived their name. 2. A woman who betrayed her native country for gold, and was therefore metamorphosed into a jackdaw. (Metamorphoses)

"Asia"
Greek 1. A surname of Athena in Colchis. Her worship was believed to have been brought from thence by Castor and Polydeuces to Laconia, where a temple was built to her at Las. 2. A daughter of Oceåñuś and Tethys, who became by Japetus the mother of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. (Theogony of Hesiod 359.) According to some traditions the continent of Asia derived its name from her.

"Atthis"
Greek Or Attis, a daughter of Cranaus, from whom Attica, which was before called Actaea, was believed to have derived its name. The two birds into which Philomele and her sister Procne were metamorphosed, were likewise called Attis.
Nymph name
"Azan"
Greece A son of Ares and the nymph Erato, was the brother of Apheidas and Elatus, and father of Cleitor. The part of Arcadia which he received from his father was called, after him, Azania. After his death, funeral games, which were believed to have been the first in Greece, were celebrated in his honour.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.