8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Egypt" - 546 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Sekhet-Hor"
Egypt / Lower cow goddess. The fostermother of the god HORUS and particularly invoked to safeguard cattle....
Goddess name
"Sekhmet"
Egypt The lioness-headed goddess of war and destruction, the sister and wife of Ptah, was created by the fire of Re's eye. Egypt
Goddess name
"Selket"
Egypt Goddess of scorpions, a protector of the embalmer's tent and helper of women in childbirth. Egypt
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Sepset"
Egypt Local funerary goddess from Memphis Egypt
Goddess name
"Sepset"
Egypt Local funerary goddess. Known chiefly at Memphis, where she appears as an attendant at the ritual of the weighing of the heart....
Deity name
"Serapis"
Egypt The most important deity at Alexandria during the time of Ptolemy Soter, his worship spread throughout Egypt and into the Roman Empire. Egypt
Goddess name
"Serket(-hetyt)"
Egypt Minor mortuary goddess. Known from the middle of the third millennium BC, she protects the throne of the king in the guise of a scorpion. She is depicted in human form wearing a headpiece in the form of a scorpion with its sting raised. In the Pyramid Texts she is the mother of the scorpion god NEHEBU-KAU. In her role as a mortuary goddess she is partly responsible for guarding the jars containing the viscera of the deceased. Although she is never identified as warding off the effect of scorpion stings, her influence has been regarded as effective against other venomous attacks. Also Selkis (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Serket[-hetyt]"
Egypt A minor mortuary goddess
Goddess name
"Serkethetyt"
Egypt Minor mortuary goddess Egypt
Goddess name
"Serqet"
Egypt Goddess of the morning star Egypt
Goddess name
"Ses'at"
Egypt Goddess of libraries and the art of writing. Known from 2500 BC, or earlier, until the end of Egyptian history circa AD 400. She is depicted anthropomorphically bearing a seven-pointed star or rosette on her head, sometimes atop a wand and below a bow-shaped object. Early in her career she was åśśociated with the ritual of “stretching the cord” during which boundary poles were rammed into the ground by the king before measuring out the foundations of a sanctuary. As a scribe she recorded the lists of foreign captives and their tributes. At Karnak in Upper Egypt and at Dendara she recorded the royal jubilees on a notched palm stem.See also SEFKHET-ABWY....
Goddess name
"Sesat"
Egypt Goddess of Books and knowledge Egypt
Goddess name
"Seshat"
Egypt Goddess of writing and measurement, also the patroness of mathmatics, architecture and record-keeping. Egypt
Goddess name
"Sesmetet"
See also SAKHMET Egyptian goddess. Seta...

"Set"
Egypt The son of Seb and Nut, is the brother of Osiris, Isis, and Nephthys; and the father of Anubis by Nephthys. Set stole the light from the Sun, resulting in autumn and Winter. Egypt
God name
"Seth"
Egypt Lord of Lower Egypt. Desert god åśśociated with storms. Egypt
God name
"Sezmu"
Egypt Minor god of one of the wine and oil presses Egypt
God name
"Shai"
Egypt God of fate Egypt
Goddess name
"Shait"
Egypt Goddess of justice Egypt
God name
"Shu"
Egypt God of light, åśśociated with heat and dryness, often depicted as holding up the sky with his two hands, one at the place of Sunrise, the other of Sunset. Egypt
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.