8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Sanskrit" - 31 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
King name
"Acala aka Achala"
Buddhist / India Acala, is the best known of the Five Wisdom kings of the Womb Realm. Acala means "The Immovable One" in Sanskrit. Acala is also the name of the eighth of the ten stages of the path to buddhahood. Acala is the destroyer of delusion and the protector of Buddhism. Buddhist / India
Goddess name
"Anumati"
Sanskrit A lunar deity and goddess of wealth, intellect, children, spirituality and prosperity. Also Anumati is a type of full moon day in which the moon remains slightly cut and not fully full moon called as Chaturdashi bhiddha purnima Sanskrit
Deities name
"BRARMA (the creator)"
Hindu / India Creator god. With VIS'NU and SIVA, Brahma is one of a trinity of supreme creator deities in the Hindu pantheon. Brahma is depicted with four heads, often bearded, facing in four directions, and with four hands, sometimes with one of them raised in blessing or promise. As a god of knowledge he often carries the Vedas (earliest Sanskrit mythology said to have sprung from his head) in one of his hands. According to one legendary source he was created from the right side of the primordial creator force....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Spirit name
"Devas aka daeva"
Hindu A type of celestial being that appears in both Persian mythology and Hinduism. Named after a Sanskrit word meaning "god," the deva emerged in Hindu teachings as a spiritual being, serving the supreme beings.
Supreme god name
"Isvara"
Hindu / Puranic Epithet of the god SIVA. In Sanskrit designated the “supreme god who rules the universe.” The generic title of a Hindu's personal high god. In Buddhism the name of a YAKSA attending the eleventh tirthankara....
Goddess name
"Jw"
Buddhist Ja'u, Jawi. Possibly a part of the syncretistic Agami Jawi. Many Hindu-Buddhist gods, called dewata with Sanskrit names, are incorporated in Agami Jawi. Dewi Sri comes from Sri, the consort of Vishnu, and in Java is the goddess of fertility and rice.
Demon name
"Kasyapa (deriving from the Sanskrit for “tortoise”)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic Primordial god. In Vedic literature a Divine demiurge and father of mankind, snake demons, DEVAS etc. His name stems, arguably, from the notion of the cosmos as a giant tortoise. He has had thirteen consorts. In other texts he is the father of the god NARADA who consorted with one of the daughters of DAKSA. Also PRAJAPATI....
Deity name
"Lha"
Buddhist - Lamaist / Tibet Generic term for a deity. Also the title for a deity in the old Bon pantheon, equating to the Sanskrit term DEVA....
Deity name
"Munisvara"
Hindu / Dravidian A regional Tamil deity who is popular amongst the least Sanskritized social groups of South India specifically Tamil Nadu. Hindu / Dravidian
Deities name
"Nagaraja"
Hindu A Sanskrit word from naga (snake) and raj (king) meaning king of Snakes. It is applied to two main deities, Vasuki and Takshak. Vasuki and Takshak are brothers, children of Kashyap and Kadru, who are the parents of all snakes. Hindu

"Nath"
Sanskrit Natha, is the proper name of a siddha sampradaya (initiatory tradition) and the word itself literally means "lord, protector, refuge". The related Sanskrit term Adi Natha means first or original Lord, and is therefore a synonym for Shiva, Mahadeva, or Maheshvara, and beyond these mental concepts, the Supreme Absolute Reality as the basis supporting all aspects and manifestatons of consciousness.
God name
"Neti Neti"
Sanskrit Not this, not this. Sanskrit words expressing the inexplicable Ultimate, the Absolute, the transcendental, the Divine, God.

"Para"
Sanskrit In philosophy, infinite, supreme; the final limit. Sanskrit
God name
"Prachetas"
Sanskrit Pracetas. The preeminently intelligent one; a name of Varuna, the god of water. Sanskrit

"Prachetasas"
Sanskrit Prachetasah. The preeminently intelligent ones; the ten prachetasas were sons of Prachinabarhis and Savarna, the daughter of the ocean. Sanskrit

"Raga"
Sanskrit The personification of desire, påśśion, love and affection. Sanskrit
God name
"Raibhyas"
Sanskrit A clåśś of gods of the fifth manvantara, the first half of the third round. Sanskrit

"Reliquiae"
Sanskrit The astral shells or spooks of human beings and animals which are left in the lower strata after death. Similar to bhuta. Sanskrit

"Sabda"
Sanskrit The cosmic Word, equivalent to the Greek Logos. Sanskrit
King name
"Sagara"
Sanskrit A king of the solar dynasty and sovereign of Ayodhya. He was the father of 60,000 sons who were turned into a heap of ashes by a glance of the sage Kapila. Sanskrit
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.