8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "death" - 305 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
King name
"Rhadamanthys"
Greek A son of Zeus and Europa, and brother of king Minos of Crete, or, according to others, a son of Hephaestus. From fear of his brother he fled to Ocaleia in Boeotia, and there married Alcmene. In consequence of his justice throughout life, he became, after his death, one of the judges in the lower world, and took up his abode in Elysium. Greek
God name
"Rudra (howler)"
Hindu / Vedic weather god. An early deity, largely superseded by SIVA, who controls the gales and storms. Often linked with the fire god AGNI and the Rain god INDRA. Generally a malignant god, Rudra lives in the mountains and is deemed to be either tall or dwarf, depending on the severity of the storm. He brings death and disease to man and domestic animals through his “thousand shafts,” and is considered to be highly unpredictable....

"Ruydera"
Britain The duenna of Belerma She had seven daughters, who wept so bitterly at the death of Durandarte that Merlin, out of pity, turned them into lakes or estuaries. Britain
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Angel name
"Samael"
Chaldean The Prince of darkness, the angel of death or Poison. Hebreo-Chaldean Qabbalah

"Sarapis"
Egyptian Serapis, an Egyptian divinity, the worship of which was introduced into Greece in the time of the Ptolemies. Apollodorus (ii) states that Serapis was the name given to Apis after his death and deification.
God name
"Sarapis"
Late Egypt God. Known only from the Greco-Roman period of the early Ptolemies (fourth century BC) but persisting in Europe until second or third century AD. In Egyptian religion Sarapis is a hybridization of certain aspects of OSIRIS, the underworld god, and APIS, the bull god, who symbolizes the earthly presence of PTAH. Sarapis is perceived to epitomize both the fertility of the land and the life of the sacred bull after death. In Greek mythology he takes on aspects of ZEUS, HELIOS, ASKLEPIOS and DIONYSOS. He was worshiped extensively in the Roman Empire period. A sanctuary at York in England was dedicated by a soldier of the sixth legion, and magnificent statues were discovered in the Walbrook Mithraeum in London, and at Merida in Spain. Also Seraphis (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Semele (earth)"
Greco - Roman but probably of Thracian or Phrygian origin Mother goddess. According to legend she was the mortal daughter of Cadmos and became the mother of the god DIONYSOS (BACCHUS) after a brief liaison with ZEUS (JUPITER), also in mortal guise. Semele was burned to death on Olympus, unable to withstand the presence of Zeus in godly form, but was subsequently deified by him....
Goddess name
"Sheela Na Gig"
Celtic / Irish Mother goddess. The primal earth mother closely åśśociated with life and death. One of the rare depictions of Irish Celtic deities that have survived into the Christian era. She is shown naked, with large breasts, with her legs apart and holding open her vag***. The image frequently adorns walls of Irish churches. Also Sheila na Cioch....
God name
"Somnus"
Greek The personification and god of sleep, the Greek Hypnos, is described by the ancients as a brother of death and as a son of night Roman
Goddess name
"Spadareamet"
Armenia Chthonic goddess concerned with fertility of the earth and death, the Christians equate her name with hell Armenia
Goddess name
"Spandaramet"
Pre - Christian Armenian Chthonic goddess. Concerned with the fertility of the earth and with death. Under Christian influence, her name equates with hell....
God name
"Sraddha-deva"
Hindu An epithet of Yama, the god of death and king of the underworld. Hindu

"Suoyatar"
Finnish One of the forces of evil in the Kalevala, who gives birth to the serpent of evil or death by means of her spittle. Finnish
God name
"Supai"
Inca God of death Inca

"Surma"
Finland The personification of a violent death.
God name
"Ta'xet"
Haida God of the sky, who receives the souls of those who die by violence. With Tia, he makes up the Dual death God. Haida
God name
"Ta'xet"
Haida Indian / Queen Charlotte Island, Canada God of death. The deity responsible for those who die violently.See also TIA....

"Tai Yi Jiu Ku Tian Cun"
Taoist Tai Yi Jiu Ku Tian Cun, one of the highest rulers in the 10-stage Taoist Hell. Upon death, all human souls must appear before him to be sentenced. Taoist
Goddess name
"Taiaai"
Australian aboriginal Snake god. His consorts include the snake goddesses Mantya, Tuknampa and Uka. He is revered mainly by tribal groups living on the western seaboard of the Cape York peninsula in northern queensland. Taipan has the typical attributes of many other Australian snake gods, including the Rainbow snake. He exercises judgment over life or death and possesses great wisdom, a universal characteristic of serpents. He is able to kill or cure and is the deity who originally fashioned the blood of living things during the Dreamtime. The imagery of the snake god is closely linked with aboriginal shamanism and with the healing rituals of shamans....
King name
"Talos"
Greek A man of bråśś, the work of Hephaestus. This wonderful being was given to Minos by Zeus or Hephaestus, and watched the island of Crete by walking round the island thrice every day. Whenever he saw strangers approaching, he made himself red-hot in fire, and then embraced the strangers when they landed. He had in his body only one vein, which ran from the head to the ankles, and was closed at the top with a nail. When he attempted to keep the Argonauts from Crete by throwing stones at them, Medeia by her magic powers threw him into a state of madness, or, according to others, under the pretence of making him immortal, she took the nail out of his vein and thus caused him to bleed to death. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.