8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deity Greek" - 44 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"ASKLEPIOS"
Greek God of physicians and healing. The son of APOLLO and a mortal consort, Coronis, Asklepios lived effectively as a mortal and died as such. He was nonetheless regarded as a deity....
Deity name
"Abracax"
Greek Also written Abraxas or Abrasax, in Persian mythology denotes the Supreme Being. In Greek notation it stands for 365. In Persian mythology Abracax presides over 365 impersonated virtues, one of which is supposed to prevail on each day of the year. In the second century the word was employed by the Basilidians for the deity; it was also the principle of the Gnostic hierarchy, and that from which sprang their numerous Æons.
Deity name
"Abraxas"
Greek Aka Abraxis, Abrsax, viewed as the supreme deity and the source of Divine emanations, the ruler of all the 365 heavens, or circles of creation--one for each day of the year. The number 365 corresponds to the numerical value of the seven Greek letters that form the word abraxas. The name Abraxas was taken from abra-cadabra.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Aesculapius"
Roman God of healing. Developed from the Greek deity ASKLEPIOS and introduced into Rome in 293 BC as a plague god. Attributes include the caduceus (winged scepter), the symbol of modern Medicine....
Deity name
"Aglibol"
Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia
God name
"Alalu"
Hittite / Hurrian Primordial god. The archetypal deity who precedes AN(U) in the formation of the cosmos. He was identified by the Greeks as HYPSISTOS (the highest)....
God name
"Areimanios"
Greek Chthonic underworld god. Probably derived from the Persian deity AHRIMAN. Plutarch identifies him as the embodiment of HADES....
Goddess name
"Armkis [Greek]"
Egypt / Upper Birth goddess. Minor deity with cult centers in lower Nubia and at Elephantine. She is variously the daughter of RE, and of KHNUM and SATIS. Anukis lives in the cataracts of the Lower Nile. Her portrait appears in the Temple of Rameses II at Beit-et-Wali where she suckles the pharaoh, suggesting that she is connected with birth and midwifery, but she also demonstrates a malignant aspect as a strangler (see HATHOR). Her sacred animal is the gazelle. Depicted anthropomorphically wearing a turban (modius) with ostrich feathers. Also Anuket (Egyptian)....
Deity name
"Atunis aka Atuns"
Etruscan The Etruscan incarnation of the popular life-death-rebirth deity. He is a consort for Turan. Originally non-Etruscan, directly from Greek Adonis. Etruscan
Deities name
"Baa! Samin (lord of heaven)"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Head of the pantheon. Probably originated in Canaanite culture as a god of Rain and vegetation, but became extensively revered in places as far apart as Cyprus and Carthage. Epithets include “bearer of thunder.” Baal Samin is first mentioned in a fourteenth century BC treaty between the Hittite king Suppiluliuma and Nigmadu II of Ugarit. He had a major sanctuary at Byblos, according to inscription, “built by Yehemilk.” Josephus confirms that his cult existed at the time of Solomon. At Karatepe his name appears at the head of a list of national deities and on Seleucid coinage he is depicted wearing a half-moon crown and carrying a radiate Sun disc. Other epithets include “lord of eternity” and he may also have been god of storms at sea, a patron deity of mariners. By Hellenic times he equated with ZEUS in the Greek pantheon and the Romans identified him as Caelus (sky). Also Baal-Samem....
God name
"Benu"
Egypt / Upper Transmuted bird-like form of a Sun god. A deity mentioned in Pyramid Texts (circa twenty-fifth century BC) and linked with the Sun god of Heliopolis, ATUM. He is also said to have been self-created from the primeval ocean and is sometimes a symbol of rebirth in the afterlife. Benu may have augmented the Greek clåśśical tradition of the Phoenix. He appears in the Old kingdom as a yellow wagtail but later becomes a heron, wearing the conical white crown of Upper Egypt with two slender feathers pointing backwards from its crest....
Deity name
"Dianic Wicca"
Greek A Wiccan path that focuses on the strong female deity Diana.
God name
"Dionysia"
Greek Festivals celebrated in various parts of Greece in honour of Dionysus. We have to consider under this head several festivals of the same deity, although some of them bore different names, for here, as in other cases, the name of the festival was sometimes derived from that of the god, sometimes from the place where it was celebrated, and sometimes from some particular cirçúɱstance connected with its celebration. Greek
Goddess name
"Discordia"
Roman Minor goddess of dissent. Modeled on the Greek deity ERIS....
Deity name
"Empyrean"
Greek There are five heavens, the last of which is pure elemental fire and the seat of deity; this fifth heaven is called the empyrean. Greek
Deity name
"Erebos"
Greek / Roman A primordial deity, different
God name
"Fates"
Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who åśśigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Goddess name
"Fortuna"
Roman Goddess of good fortune. A deity who particularly appealed to women, partly in an oracular context. She is depicted carrying a globe, rudder and cornucopiae. She probably evolved from the model of the Greek goddess TYCHE. Her main symbol is the wheel of fate which she may stand upon and Renaissance artists tended to depict her thus. Among her more celebrated sanctuaries in Rome, the temple of Fortuna Redux was built by Domitian to celebrate his victories in Germany. She is depicted in a well-known stone carving in Gloucester Museum, England, holding her three main attributes....
God name
"Glaukos"
Greek Sea god. Allegedly an impoverished fisherman who ate a sea-gråśś with magical properties, dived into the ocean and remained there as a guardian deity of fishermen and their nets.See also PROTEUS....
Goddess name
"Gunabibi"
Australian aboriginal Creator goddess. Also known as Kunapipi, she is extensively revered by aborigines in northern Australia, including the Yolngu people. Her cult bears some similarity to that of the Greek mother goddess DEMETER and to Tantric cults in India. For this reason the cult is thought to have been introduced from Asia to Arnhem Land and then to other parts of the Australian continent as early as the sixth century. Mythology indicates that Gunabibi has been perceived as a deity who came from the sea or the rivers during the Dreamtime but who reigns now over dry land. Among modern aborigines she is the subject of esoteric rituals which also involve the great serpent Yulunggul with whom Gunabibi has been closely involved....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.