8 ways to attend college for free
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Persephone

Persephone (Kore) (in Rome Proserpina)
Greek Goddess of spring, youth and underworld.

Persephone as Kore and the birth of Dionysos
Persephone is the daughter of Demeter, Goddess of vegetation, and Zeus, King of the Gods. First she was a Goddess of fertility of the earth and spring called Kore (girl). In the form of a snake Zeus seduced Persephone/Kore, and Dionysos, God of wine, was born. Zeus wanted him to rule the world, but Hera, Queen of the Gods and Zeus wife, was jealous and made the Titans kill him. When he was killed, Athena rescued his heart and Dionysos was later reborn from Semele.

Persephone and abduction to Hades

Once when Persephone was playing on a field away from her mother, Hades, Lord of the Underworld abducted her to be his wife and to rule the underworld with him. Only Hekate, Goddess of the moon and Helios, God of the sun, heared her cries for help. Demeter got angry because Hades took her daughter, and stopped everything on earth from growing. In time Zeus asked his brother Hades to return Persephone back from the underworld to her mother. When Hades heard that, he lured Persephone to eat a pomegranate seed, that were symbols of marriage, so that she would remain bound to the underworld and him forever. As a compromise, it was decided that Persephone would stay two-thirds of the year in upper world, and in that time Demeter would restore fertility to the ground. One third of the year she would stay in the underworld with Hades and rule with him. So Persephone is Goddess of fertility, youth and spring as well as death and the underworld.

Persephone in Hades

When Persephone was in Hades (the name of the underworld is also Hades), she was not just a passive figure, but did also join her husband in making decisions regarding the dead. In the Odyssey, Odysseys preys to her when he is approaching the underworld. She also granted Teiresias the privilege of retaining his wits in Hades, while other dead mortals wandered around as empty shades.

Persephone, Aphrodite and Adonis

Aphrodite and Persephone were both so impressed by the beauty of baby Adonis, God of fertility and vegetation, that they both wanted to keep him. Zeus, after consulting Calliope the Muse of epic poetry, did decide that Adonis was to spend one third of the year with Aphrodite, one third with Persephone and one third by himself, tough Adonis decided to spend his own third also with Aphrodite. When Adonis growned up, he was killed by a wild boar.


Sacred Days

Phases of the moon dedicated to her:
Days 1-3 (new moon) dedicated to her as Persephone
Days 7-9 dedicated to her as Kore.
Festivals dedicated to her
Mabon (autumn equinox) about 23 September. Time of the greater Eleusinian mysteries in ancient Greece. Day is sacred to Demeter and Persephone.
25 November. Festival celebrating women´s mysteries dedicated to Persephone.





List of Gods : "persephone" - 25 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
King name
"Aidoneus"
Greek A mythical king of the Molossians, the husband of Persephone, and father of Core. Greek
Goddess name
"Alpanu aka Alpan"
Etruscan Goddess of love and one of the Lasas, and a ruler of the underworld. Possibly equated with the Greek goddess Persephone. In art, she was usually depicted as a nude or semi-nude winged maiden. Etruscan
Goddess name
"Auxesia"
Greek The goddess who grants growth and prosperity to the fields, a surname of Persephone. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Azesi"
Greek A surname of Demeter and Persephone, which is derived either from "to dry fruits", or from "to seek". Greek
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.

"Brimo"
Greek The angry or the terrifying, occurs as a surname of several divinities, such as Hecate or Persephone (Argonautica), Demeter, and Cybele. Greek
God name
"Daffodil"
Greek / Roman Or "Lent Lily," was once white; but Persephone, daughter of Demeter, delighted to wander about the flowery meadows of Sicily. One spring, throwing herself on the gråśś, she fell asleep. The god of the Infernal regions, Pluto, fell in love with the beautiful maid, and carried her off for his bride. His touch turned the white flowers to a golden yellow, and some of them fell in Acheron, where they grew luxuriantly; and ever since the flower has been planted on graves. Greek / Roman
Goddess name
"Despina"
Greek Or Despoena, the daughter of Poseidon and Demeter after they mated disguised as horses. Despoena, the ruling goddess or the mistress, occurs as a surname of several divinities, such as Aphrodite, Demeter and Persephone. Greek
Goddess name
"Despoena"
Greek 1. A goddess of fruit. A daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. Known as Pomona to the Romans 2. The ruling goddess or the mistress, occurs as a surname of several divinities, such as Aphrodite, Demeter and Persephone. Greek
Goddess name
"Epaine"
Greek The fearful, a surname of Persephone. Plutarch suggests, that it might also be understood in a euphemistic sense as the praised goddess. Greek
God name
"Eurydice"
Greek The most famous was a woman-or a nymph-who was the wife of Orpheus. While fleeing from Aristaeus, she was bitten by a serpent and died. Distraught, Orpheus played such sad songs and sang so mournfully that all the nymphs and gods wept and gave him advice. Orpheus accomplished something no other person ever has: he traveled to the underworld and by his music softened the heart of Hades and Persephone, who allowed Eurydice to return with him to the world of the living. Greek

"Hecate"
Greek A mysterious divinity, who, according to the most common tradition, was a daughter of Persaeus or Perses and Asteria, whence she is called Perseis. Others describe her as a daughter of Zeus and Demeter, and state that she was sent out by her father in search of Persephone; others again make her a daughter of Zeus either by Pheraea or by Hera; and others, lastly, say that she was a daughter of Leto or Tartarus. Greek
Goddess name
"Kore (tbe girl)"
Greek Youthful goddess of the corn. The more generic name for the goddess PERSEPHONE. Identified as the daughter of DEMETER. She is the spirit of the corn as distinct from her mother who is the giver of the corn. Depicted on coinage as a woman's head adorned with ears of corn. She is integral to the Eleusinian Mysteries in which she is abducted to Hades, resulting in the distress of her mother and the blighting of nature. At Samaria-Sebaste in Syrio-Palestine, Kore was the only deity worshiped, apart from the emperor....

"Kore or Core"
Hopi The maiden, a name by which Persephone is often called. Greek
Goddess name
"Kostroma"
Russian Benevolent and malevolent fertility goddess; like the Greeks' Persephone, she is a dying and reborn daughter. Russian
Nymph name
"Leucippe"
Greek 1. One of the nymphs who was with Persephone at the time she was carried off. 2. The wife of Ilus, and mother of Laomedon. 3. A daughter of Thestor. 4. The wife of Thestius. 5. A daughter of Minyas of Orchomenos. Greek

"Libitina"
Italian An ancient Italian divinity, who was identified by the later Romans sometimes with Persephone on account of her connection with the dead and their burial, and sometimes with Aphrodite.
Goddess name
"Persephone"
Greek Goddess of death and spring, queen of the underworld. Greek

"Pluto"
Greek 1. A daughter of Oceåñuś and Tethys, and one of the playmates of Persephone.
Goddess name
"Proserpina"
Roman but derived from a Greek model Goddess of death. Abducted by the underworld god PLUTO to reign as his queen (see PERSEPHONE)....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.


Sources:
Michael Jordan, Encyclopedia of gods 2002
Michael Senior, Who´s who in mythology 1985
Elizabeth Hallan, Mytologian Jumalat (Gods and Goddesses, 96) 1997
Nigel Pennick, the Pagan book of days 1992
Arthur Cotterell, Mytologia: Jumalia, Sankareita, Myyttejä 2005
Robin Hard, the Routledge handbook of Greek mythology 2004