8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Syrian" - 52 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"ASTORETH"
Philistine , Israel, Lebanon Fertility goddess. Astoreth equates with the Syrian goddess ASTARTE, both being modeled on the Mesopotamian ISTAR. She was adopted, typically, as goddess of both love and war. She is usually depicted wearing a horned headdress....
Deity name
"Abracadabra"
Assyrians A charm. It is said that Abracadabra was the supreme deity of the Assyrians. Q. Severus Sammonicus recommended the use of the word as a powerful antidote against ague, flux, and toothache. The word was to be written on parchment, and suspended round the neck by a linen thread.
Deity name
"Aglibol"
Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Anshur aka Ashur"
Akkadian Or Asshur, a sky god and the husband of his sister Kishar ("earth axle"); they are the children of the serpents Lahmu and Lahamu, and the parents of Anu and Ea. He is sometimes depicted as having Ninlil as a consort. As Anshar, he is progenitor of the Akkadian pantheon; as Ashur, he is the head of the Assyrian pantheon
Goddess name
"Anunit aka Anunitu"
Chaldea The Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. Anunit, Astarte and Atarsamain are alternative names for Ishtar. Chaldea
God name
"Assur"
Mesopotamian / Babylonian - Akkadian Tutelary god. The national deity of Assyria. In the Assyrian copies of the creation epic Enuma Elis he replaces MARDUK as the hero....
Goddess name
"Atargatis"
Northern Syrian Mother goddess. She enjoyed major cults at Khirbet Tannur, where she is depicted as the vegetation goddess in nine separate variations, and at Khirbet Brak, where she is åśśociated with dolphins. She often carries a cornucopia linking her with the goddess TYCHE (fortune) and may commonly be flanked by lions. She sometimes carries a rudder or wears the mural crown of a city guardian. There are hints of sky affinities in some depictions, with a sign of the zodiac or a nimbus-like veil....
Goddess name
"Atars'amain (morning star of heaven)"
Pre - Islamic northern / central Arabian Astral deity of uncertain gender. Worshiped particularly by the Is”amme tribe, but revered widely among other Arabs. Known from circa 800 BC and identified in letters of the Assyrian kings Es”arhaddon and Assurbanipal. May be synonymous with the Arab goddess ALLAT whose cult was centered on Palmyra....
Demon name
"Baal"
Assyrian Baal is a Northwest Semitic title and honorific meaning "master" or "lord" that is used for various gods, spirits and demons particularly of the Levant, cognate to Assyrian belu.
Goddess name
"Baubo"
Western Semitic / Syrian Mother goddess. Known locally from Priene and largely became syncretized with ATARGATIS, KYBELE, etc....
Goddess name
"Bel"
Akkadian Bel became especially used of the Babylonian god Marduk and when found in Assyrian and neo-Babylonian personal names or mentioned in inscriptions in Mesoptamian context it can usually be taken as referring to Marduk and no other god. Similarly Belit without some disambiguation mostly refers to Bel Marduk's spouse Sarpanit. However Marduk's mother, the Sumerian goddess called Ninhursag, Ningal and Ninmah and other names in Sumerian, was often known as Belit-ili 'Lady of the Gods' in Akkadian.

"Belesis or Belesys"
Assyrian The noblest of the Chaidaean priests at Babylon, who, according to the account of Ctesias, is said, in conjunction with Arbaces, the Mede, to have overthrown the old Assyrian empire. Beiesis afterwards received the satrapy of Babylon from Arbaces.
God name
"Bethel"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Local tutelary god. Probably of Aramaean or Syrian origin. First mentioned in a fourteenth century treaty between the Hittite king Suppiluliuma and Nigmadu II of Ugarit [Ras Samra]. He appears more regularly on inscriptions from the end of the seventh century BC and enjoyed considerable popularity during the neo-Babylonian period. Bethel is mentioned in the Biblical text of Jeremiah 48.13, implying that some Israelites acknowledged this deity. There is no evidence of links with the historical place names, including that mentioned in Genesis 38.13....
God name
"Dagan (1)"
Mesopotamian / Babylonian - Akkadian Grain and fertility god. Generally linked with ANU in giving status to cities e.g. the dedications by the ninth-century BC Assyrian king Assur-nasir-apli at Kalakh. Cult centers existed at Tuttul and Terqa....

"Deluges"
Chinese The principle ones are: the deluge of Fohi, Chinese. The Satyavrata, of the Indians; the Xisuthrus, of the Assyrians; the Mexican deluge; Noah's Flood and the Greek deluges of Deucalion and Ogyges.
God name
"Dolichenus"
Western Semitic / Syrian weather god. Depicted bearded and standing upon a bull. Attributes include a double ax and lightning. He became syncretized with the Roman god JUPITER....
God name
"Elagabal (lord of the mountain)"
Syrian Local tutelary god. Probably originating as a mountain deity with strong solar links. His sacred animal is the eagle. His cult was based on the town of Emesa [Homs], where he was worshiped in the form of a dome-shaped, black stone obelisk. His name became Hellenized as Heliogabalos....

"Eljon"
Syria Old syrian diety who was incorporated into El as El-Eljon, an epithet of Yahweh.
Goddess name
"Fatima"
Syrian The great goddess of the moon and fate, the source of the Sun and the virgin queen of heaven. Syrian
God name
"Genneas"
Syrian A Syrian Sun god likes to ride horses.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.