8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "water" - 417 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Spirit name
"Vodyanoy"
Slavic A malevolent water spirit who likes to drown humans. Slavic
God name
"Volturnus"
Sabine A river god of the waters, probably derived from a local Sabine regional cult.
God name
"Wadj Wer (the mighty green one)"
Egypt Fertility god. Sometimes depicted in androgynous form, he personifies the Mediterranean Sea or the major lakes of the Nile delta. He is depicted carrying the ankh symbol of life, and a loaf. The figure often appears pregnant and is åśśociated with the richness of the Nile delta waters....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Wagyl"
Australia A snakelike creature who created the waterways in and around the south-west of Western Australia
Goddess name
"Wigan"
Philippines Goddess of water Philippines

"Wild Huntsman"
German The German tradition is that a spectral hunter with dogs frequents the Black Forest to chase the wild animals. The English name is "Herne the Hunter," who was once a keeper in windsor Forest. In Winter time, at midnight, he walks about Herne's Oak, and blasts trees and cattle. He wears horns, and rattles a chain in a "most hideous manner". Another legend is that a certain Jew would not suffer Jesus to drink out of a horse-trough, but pointed to some water in a hoof-print as good enough for "such an enemy of Moses," and that this man is the "Wild Huntsman." Various
Monster name
"Yacu-mama"
Indian Mother of waters. A fabulous sea-snake, fifty paces long and twelve yards in girth, said to lurk in the lagunes of South America, and in the river Amazon. This monster draws into its mouth whatever påśśes within a hundred yards of it, and for this reason an Indian will never venture to enter an unknown lagune till he has blown his horn, which the yacu-mama never fails to answer if it is within hearing. By this means the danger apprehended is avoided. South America
King name
"Yang"
China Is the brighter element; it is active, light, masculine, upward-seeking and corresponds to the day. Yin is often symbolized by water or earth, while Yang is symbolized by fire, or wind. China
Goddess name
"Yemanja"
Yoruba Yemonja, a mother goddess; patron deity of women, especially pregnant women; and the Ogun river, the waters of which are said to cure infertility. Yoruba
Goddess name
"Yemoja"
Yoruba / Nigeria, West Africa Goddess of water. The creatrix of all the rivers in the area, particularly the river Ogun. She is chiefly worshiped by women and the sacred river water is considered a remedy for infertility. She is propitiated with animal and vegetable sacrifices. Attributes: cowrie shells....

"Ymir"
Norse A primal giant, also called Aurgelmir; he was androgynous and had six heads. He was created as the first living being together with Audhumla when the fire of Muspellsheimr met the water of Niflheimr. Ymir is the ancestor of the Thursir, the Hrymthussir, and of the Aesir. Slain by his grandson Odin, his body was set adrift in the emptiness, and from the parts of his body the nine worlds were created. His blood is the water of the worlds, his hair are the trees, his skull is the sky, the brain the clouds, his flesh is Midgard and his eyebrows are a fence which protects Midgard. Norse

"Yusmir"
Nazorean Yusmir the First Vine - gave the staff of water to Yawar. Early Nazorean
Spirit name
"Zagan"
s He is a Great king and President, appearing at first in the Form of a Bull with Gryphon's Wings; but after a while he putteth on Human Shape. He maketh Men Witty. He can turn Wine into water, and blood into Wine, also water into Wine. He can turn all Metals into Coin of the Dominion that Metal is of. He can even make Fools wise. He governeth 33 Legions of spirits. The Lesser Key Of Solomon

"Zara-ma-yha-who"
Aboriginal A little red man, about 4 feet tall, with a large head and mouth. The tips of the fingers and toes were shaped like the suckers of an octopus. They lived in wild fig trees and capture their prey by dropping on påśśers-by. A Zara-ma-yha-who might jump on top of the person and drain their blood with their hands and feet. Their victims rarely died from the initial encounter, but because the person was left in a weak and helpless state, the yara-ma-yha-who would return later and swallow the victim. It then drank water and took a nap. When it awoke, it would regurgitate the undigested portion of its meal, which, if the meal was a person, that person would still be alive. Aboriginal
Goddess name
"Zarya"
Slavic Goddess of healing waters Slavic
Goddess name
"Zu"
Akkadian A lesser divinity of Akkadian mythology, and the son of the bird goddess Siris. Both Zu and Siris are seen as måśśive birds who can breathe fire and water, although Zu is alternately seen as a lion-headed eagle
God name
"sMan-Bla (physician)"
Buddhist - Lamaist / Tibet God. One of the more popular Medicine-buddhas and possibly derived from Persian light-religion. Attributes: fruit and waterjar....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.