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List of Gods : "Ar stat"
NameOriginDescription
Agrotera Greek The huntress, a surname of Artemis. At Agrae on the Ilissus, where she was believed to have first hunted after her arrival from Delos, Artemis Agrotera had a temple with a statue carrying a bow. Greek
Althaea Greek A daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius and Eurythemis, and sister of Lecla, Hypermnestra, Iphiclus, Euippus, etc. She was married to Oeneus, king of Calydon, by whom she became the mother of Troxeus, Thyreus, Clymenus, and Meleager, and of two daughters, Gorge and Deianeira. (Apollodorus i) Apollodorus states, that according to some, Meleager was regarded as the fruit of her intercourse with Ares, and that she was mother of Deianeira by Dionysus.
Aphrodite Greek One of the great Olympian divinities, according to the popular and poetical notions of the Greeks, the goddess of love and beauty. Some traditions stated that she had sprung from the foam of the sea, which had gathered around the mutilated parts of Uranus, that had been thrown into the sea by Cronus after he had unmanned his father. (Theogony of Hesiod)
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Atum Egypt The first god, having arisen by his own force himself, sitting on a mound (benben), from the primordial waters (Nu). Early myths state that Atum created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut from his semen by masturbation in the city of Annu. Egypt
Daphnaea and Daphnaeus Greek Surnames of Artemis and Apollo respectively, derived from a laurel, which was sacred to Apollo. In the case of Artemis it is uncertain why she bore that surname, and it was perhaps merely an allusion to her statue being made of laurel-wood. Greek
Elara Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
Ellyllon Welsh The souls of the ancient Druids, which, being too good for hell, and not good enough for heaven, are permitted to wander upon earth till the judgment day, when they will be admitted to a higher state of being. Welsh
Helios Greek In Greece the cult of Helios was very ancient and was practised throughout the land, at Elis, at Apollonia, on the Acropolis of Corinth, at Argos, at Troezen, on Cape Taenarum, at Athens, in Thrace and finally, and especially, in the island of Rhodes which was sacred to him. In Rhodes could be seen.the colossal statue of HeIios, the renowned work of the sculptor Chares. It was about thirty yards high, and ships in full sail could pass between the god's legs. Greek
Hubal Arabic An Arab idol brought from Bulka, in Syria, by Amir Ibn-Lohei, who asserted that it would procure rain when wanted. It was the statue of a man in red agate; one hand being lost, a golden one was supplied. He held in his hand seven arrows without wings or feathers, such as the Arabians use in divination. This idol was destroyed in the eighth year of "the flight." Arabic
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Hypnos Greek The personification and god of sleep, the Greek Hypnos, is described by the ancients as a brother of Death and as a son of Night. At Sicyon there was a statue of Sleep surnamed the giver. In works of art Sleep and Death are represented alike as two youths sleeping or holding inverted torches in their hands. Greek
Imhotep Egypt The first architect and physician known by name in written history. Two thousand years after his death, his status was raised to that of a god. He became the god of medicine and healing. He was linked to Asclepius by the Greeks. Egypt
Nemeius Greek The Nemeian, a surname of Zeus, under which he had a sanctuary at Argos, with a bronze statue, the work of Lysippus, and where games were celebrated in his honour. Greek
Nesrem Arabia A statute some fifty cubits high, in the form of an old woman. It was hollow within for the sake of giving secret oracles. Arabia
Prahana or prakriti Theosophic Matter in its elemental state, is vyaya (perishable) and parinamin, subject to change. However, when Purusha and prakriti are regarded from the standpoint of the periods of manifestation, their aspects become mayavi (illusory), and hence in their interblending actions subject to the modifications of manvantaric evolution. Theosophic
Roma Roman 1 A deity personifying the Roman state, or an personification in art of the city of Rome
Sterculius Roman A surname of Saturnus, derived from Stercus, manure, because he had promoted agriculture by teaching the people the use of manure. This seems to have been the original meaning, though some Romans state that Sterculius was a surname of Picumnus, the son of Faunus, to whom likewise improvements in agriculture are ascribed. Roman
Talos Greek A man of brass, the work of Hephaestus. This wonderful being was given to Minos by Zeus or Hephaestus, and watched the island of Crete by walking round the island thrice every day. Whenever he saw strangers approaching, he made himself red-hot in fire, and then embraced the strangers when they landed. He had in his body only one vein, which ran from the head to the ankles, and was closed at the top with a nail. When he attempted to keep the Argonauts from Crete by throwing stones at them, Medeia by her magic powers threw him into a state of madness, or, according to others, under the pretence of making him immortal, she took the nail out of his vein and thus caused him to bleed to death. Greek
Thero Sparta 1. The nurse of Ares, from whom he was believed to have received the surname of Thereitas, though Pausanias thinks that this name arose from the fierceness of the god. A sanctuary of Ares Thereitas stood on the road from Sparta to Therapne, with a statue which the Dioscuri were said to have brought from Colchis.
Utnapishtim Sumerian Utnapishtim is the wise king of the Sumerian city state of Shuruppak who, along with his wife, survived a great flood sent by Enlil to drown every living thing on Earth. Utnapishtim was secretly warned by the water god Ea of Enlil's planned and constructed a great boat or ark to save himself, his family and representatives of each species of animal.
Wakon'da N American A power by which things are brought to pass. and through this mysterious life and power all things are related to one another and to man." Wakon'da is both a force and a state of being. Omaha, Native American