8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "God Were" - 201 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Qamai'ts"
Bella Coola Indian / British Columbia, Canada Creator goddess. Said to live in the upper heaven, Atsa'axl, from where she controls the earth. According to tradition the mountains were once malevolent beings who made the world uninhabitable, until she conquered them and reduced them in size. She is never invoked or prayed to. Also Tsi Sisnaaxil (our woman); Ek Yakimtolsil (afraid of nothing)....
God name
"Quiahuitl"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Creator god. The Sun deity representing the third of the five world ages each of which lasted for 2,028 heavenly years, each heavenly year being fiftytwo terrestrial years. Assigned to the element fire and presided over by the Rain god TLALOC. According to tradition, the age ended in a cataclysmic destruction caused by a great fiery Rain. The human population perished and in doing so were transformed into dogs, turkeys and butterflies. Illustrated by the “Stone of the Four Suns” [Yale Peabody Museum]. Also Quiauhtonatiuh; Tletonatiuh....
Goddess name
"Quinoa-Mama"
PreColumbian Indian / Peru Minor goddess of the quinoa crop. Models of the deity were made from the leaves of the plant and kept for a year before being burned in a ritual to ensure a good quinine harvest....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Ranginui"
Polynesian / including Maori sky god. The socalled sky father of the Polynesian culture whose consort is PAPATUANUKU, the earth mother. During a prolonged period of inseparable intercourse they became the prime parents of the Polynesian pantheon of gods. The children found life between the bodies of the parents too cramped and conspired to force them apart. Though one offspring, TUMATAUENGA, wanted to slay them, the advice of TANEMAHUTA, the Forest god, prevailed and RANGINUI and Papatuanuku were merely forced apart....
Goddess name
"Roma"
Greek / Roman Tutelary goddess. The deity was actually conceived by the Greeks and shrines were set up at centers including Smyrna and Ephesus....
God name
"S e ab"
Egypt Minor god of wine and oil presses. Known from circa 3000 BC until the end of Egyptian history, circa AD 400. In later iconography he is depicted as a lion, but more generally is in human form. Sezmu had a definite cult following in the fertile Faiyum region of the Nile valley, but was probably represented in most sanctuaries, particularly where ritual unguents were made and stored. He is recognized in both benign and malevolent roles. In the latter he is reputed to squeeze human heads like grapes, but in beneficent mood he provides aromatic oils and ointments....
Deities name
"Sa"
Kono / eastern Guinea, West Africa Chthonic creator god. One of a pair of creator deities, with ALATANGANA. Sa inhabited the primeval swamps before the sky or the light existed and before there were any living things on earth. He had a daughter who eloped with Alatangana and bore fourteen children, three pairs of black and four pairs of white, all of whom spoke different languages and to whom Sa gave the tools of survival....
God name
"Salm of Mahram (image of Mahram)"
Pre - Islamic northern Arabian Local tutelary god. Correspondence of the Babylonian king Nabonidus (559-539 BC) mentions that this deity was worshiped at Taima, an important trade and religious center where he was head of the pantheon. Gods in the region were often named after local places and personified by a stone stele carved with schematic anthropomorphic features and a winged disc showing strong Egyptian influence. Also Salman....
Planet name
"Sani"
Chaldean God identified with the planet Saturn and whose parents were the Sun and the shade.
Demon name
"Sankhasura"
Hindu A demon who warred against the gods, stole the Vedas and hid them at the bottom of the sea. They were rescued by Vishnu in the form of a fish. Hindu
God name
"Sarapis"
Late Egypt God. Known only from the Greco-Roman period of the early Ptolemies (fourth century BC) but persisting in Europe until second or third century AD. In Egyptian religion Sarapis is a hybridization of certain aspects of OSIRIS, the underworld god, and APIS, the bull god, who symbolizes the earthly presence of PTAH. Sarapis is perceived to epitomize both the fertility of the land and the life of the sacred bull after death. In Greek mythology he takes on aspects of ZEUS, HELIOS, ASKLEPIOS and DIONYSOS. He was worshiped extensively in the Roman Empire period. A sanctuary at York in England was dedicated by a soldier of the sixth legion, and magnificent statues were discovered in the Walbrook Mithraeum in London, and at Merida in Spain. Also Seraphis (Greek)....
Planet name
"Saturnus"
Roman Astral god. Identified with the planet Saturn, but thought to have originated as an agricultural deity concerned with sowing of seed. A sanctuary existed on the Roman forum from as early as 450 BC, also functioning as the imperial treasury. Saturnus was celebrated in the Saturnalia festival (December 17-19) during which masters and slaves exchanged roles and candles were given as gifts to symbolize the Winter darkness....
Goddess name
"Sequana"
Roman / Celtic / Gallic River goddess. The tutelary goddess of the Sequanae tribe. A pre-Roman sanctuary northwest of Dijon near the source of the Seine has yielded more than 200 wooden votive statuettes and models of limbs, heads and body organs, attesting to Sequana's importance as a goddess of healing. During the Roman occupation the site of Fontes Sequanae was sacred to her and was again considered to have healing and remedial properties. A bronze statuette of a goddess was found wearing a diadem, with arms spread and standing in a boat. The prow is in the shape of a duck, her sacred animal, with a cake in its mouth. Also found were models of dogs, an animal specifically åśśociated with healing through its affinity with the Greco-Roman physician deity AESCULAPIUS....
Goddess name
"Ses'at"
Egypt Goddess of libraries and the art of writing. Known from 2500 BC, or earlier, until the end of Egyptian history circa AD 400. She is depicted anthropomorphically bearing a seven-pointed star or rosette on her head, sometimes atop a wand and below a bow-shaped object. Early in her career she was åśśociated with the ritual of “stretching the cord” during which boundary poles were rammed into the ground by the king before measuring out the foundations of a sanctuary. As a scribe she recorded the lists of foreign captives and their tributes. At Karnak in Upper Egypt and at Dendara she recorded the royal jubilees on a notched palm stem.See also SEFKHET-ABWY....
Deities name
"Shiia-Tsu-Niko"
Shinto / Japan God of winds. The most senior of his group of wind deities, he disperses the morning mists and brings soft rustling breezes. His consort is Shina-Tsu-Hime and the couple are extensively worshiped by farmers and seafarers. They were allegedly responsible for bringing about a miracle in the thirteenth century AD when they kept at bay, with off-spéñïś winds, the army of Gengis Khan. They are honored in the main IseJingu temple of Shintoism but their chief sanctuary is at Tatta, a small town in Yamamoto. Also Shina-Tobe-No-Mikoto....
Goddess name
"Spes"
Roman Goddess of hope. Foundations of a sanctuary were commenced by the emperor Tiberius, linked with a similar building dedicated to the god JANUS. She is åśśociated with gardens and depicted as a young woman bearing a bunch of flowers....
Goddess name
"Syria Dea"
De the Syrian goddess, a name by which the Syrian Astarte or Aphrodite is sometimes designated. This Astarte was a Syrian divinity, resembling in many points the Greek Aphrodite, and it is not improbable that the latter was originally the Syrian Astarte, the opinions concerning whom were modified after her introduction into Greece; for there can be no doubt that the worship of Aphrodite came from the East to Cyprus, and thence was carried into the south of Greece. Lucian, De Syria Dea
Goddess name
"Taweret"
Egypt The hippopotamus goddess & protective deity of childbirth
Goddess name
"Tawhaki"
Polynesian / Maori Heroic god. A descendant of the creator god Rehua and grandson of Whatitiri, the goddess of thunder, Tawhaki is the third child of Hema and Urutonga. He is the younger sibling of the goddess Pupu-mai-nono and the god Karihi. In some Polynesian traditions Tawhaki is thought of as a mortal ancestor whose consort was the goddess Tangotango on whom he fathered a daughter, Arahuta. Tawhaki's father was killed during tribal warfare with a mythical clan known as the Ponaturi and he himself was the subject of jealous rivalry concerning the goddess Hine-Piripiri. During this time attempts were made to kill him. He fathered children by Hine-Piripiri, including Wahieroa, who is generally perceived as being embodied in comets....
God name
"Tecciztecatl (conch shell lord)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico moon god. In cosmogony, when on the fifth day of creation the gods sat in judgment to elect the new Sun god, NANAHUATL and Tecciztecatl cremated themselves in the sacred fire. The heart of Nanahuatl ascended to become the new Sun and that of Tecciztecatl became the moon. Tradition suggests that Nanahuatl is diseased and impoverished but of great courage, while Tecciztecatl is wealthy and a coward. Alternatively, the pair are sons of QUETZALCOATL and of TLALOC and were hurled into the fire by their fathers. Also one of the group clåśśed as the TEZCATLIPOCA complex. NOTE: eventually all the gods sacrificed them selves for mankind....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.