8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deities Pre" - 49 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"AVALOKITESVARA (merciful lord)"
Buddhist / India Bodhisattva or buddhadesignate. One of the most important deities of the Mahayana sect of Buddhism. In Lamaism he is the tutelary god of Tibet. He equates with VIS NU in Hinduism and bears links with PADMAPANI. In cosmic mythology he is a creator deity. Color: white or red. Attributes: blue lotus, image of Amitabha (topmost pyramidal head), lotus, rosary, sword and water jar. NOTE: in Chinese Buddhism he is represented by the goddess Kuan-Tin, and in Japanese by KWANNON....
Deities name
"Ah Muuzencab"
Mayan / Yucatec, Mesoamerican / Mexico Bee gods. The patron deities of apiarists still invoked in parts of the Yucatan. They are thought to be represented iconographically on the tops and bottoms of stone columns at the site of Chichen Itza as aged men with long beards and upraised arms. They wear loin cloths with distinctive cross hatching....
Deities name
"Akeru"
Egypt Pluralistic chthonic earth gods. Probably stemming from the pre-Dynastic period. Malevolent deities who can seize and imprison the souls of the deceased....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Amaunet (the hidden one)"
Egypt / Upper Fertility goddess. Amaunet seems to have a taken a role as an early consort of AMUN, one of the eight deities of the OGDOAD and representing hidden power. In that context she is depicted anthropomorphically but with the head of a snake. She is shown in reliefs and as the subject of a notable statue from the Record Hall of Tuthmosis III at the Karnak complex of Thebes, where she was recognized as a benign protective deity especially called on at times of royal accession. As a fertility goddess she was largely eclipsed by the goddess MUT. She is sometimes equated with NEITH, the creator goddess of Sais, and her attributes may include the red crown of the Delta....
Goddess name
"Amba"
India Goddess of the earth, one of the deities of Pre-Aryan race, which Aryans absorbed in their pantheon. India
Deities name
"BRARMA (the creator)"
Hindu / India Creator god. With VIS'NU and SIVA, Brahma is one of a trinity of supreme creator deities in the Hindu pantheon. Brahma is depicted with four heads, often bearded, facing in four directions, and with four hands, sometimes with one of them raised in blessing or promise. As a god of knowledge he often carries the Vedas (earliest Sanskrit mythology said to have sprung from his head) in one of his hands. According to one legendary source he was created from the right side of the primordial creator force....
Goddess name
"CIPACTLI (great earth mother)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Primordial goddess. Not strictly a goddess, but significant enough in Aztec cosmogony to be included here. According to tradition she was created in the form of a huge alligator-like monster by the underworld deities MICTLANTECUHLTI and MICTECACIHUATL. She may equate with TLALTECUHTLI, the toad-like earth monster torn apart to form heaven and earth. According to one tradition she emerged from the primordial waters and engaged in a fierce struggle with the Sun god TEZCATLIPOCA during which he tore off her lower jaw to prevent her sinking back into the depths and she bit off his right foot. The mountains are said to be the scaly ridges of her skin....
Goddess name
"Centeocihuati"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Maize goddess. Represented at various sites including Tula [Hidalgo]. According to the codices Borgia, Cospi and Fejervery-Mayer she is also one of four temple deities. Also Centeotl....
Deities name
"Dsahadoldza (fringe mouth)"
Navaho / USA Chthonic god of earth and water. A number of deities are known under this title. The priest impersonating the god has one side of his body painted red and the other side black. He wears a buckskin mask painted with a horizontal yellow band to represent the evening sky and eight vertical black stripes to represent Rain....
Deities name
"Ehecatl"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Creator god. The Sun deity representing the second of the five world ages, each of which lasted for 2028 heavenly years, each heavenly year being fifty-two terrestrial years. Assigned to the air or wind and presided over by QUETZALCOATL, to whose complex of deities he belongs. According to tradition, the age ended in a cataclysmic destruction caused by hurricanes. All humanity turned into monkeys. Illustrated by the “Stone of the Four Suns” [Yale Peabody Museum]. Also (4) Ehecatl; Ehecatonatiuh....
Deities name
"Ennead"
Egypt / Lower The Heliopolis pantheon. The nine major deities enumerated and given their genealogy by the priesthood of Heliopolis, the center of the Sun-worshiping cult in Lower Egypt. Comprising the Sun god ATUM (or Atum-Re) and his offspring, S U, TEFNUT, GEB, NUT, OSIRIS, ISIS, SETH and NEPHTHYS. Other Egyptian cult centers possessed similar pantheons though not necessarily including the same list of deities. Thus, for example, the god PTAH presided at Thebes....
Goddess name
"Gramadevata"
India Generic term for a local tutelary deity. Such deities are identified as “not being served by Brahman priests.” Most are goddesses e.g. CAMUNDA, DURGA and KALI. Generally they are invoked in small villages where they guard boundaries and fields and are represented by a painted stone, but they are also to be found in larger towns and cities....
Goddess name
"Hadad"
Western Semitic / Syrian / Phoenician weather god. Derived from the Akkadian deity ADAD. In texts found at the site of the ancient Canaanite capital of Ugarit [Ras Samra] , the name of Hadad apparently becomes a substitute for that of BAAL. His voice is described as roaring from the clouds and his weapon is the thunderbolt. His mother is the goddess ASERAH. During Hellenic times he was predominantly worshiped at Ptolemais and Hierapolis. His Syrian consort is ATARGATIS, who overshadowed him in local popularity at Hierapolis. Statues of the two deities were carried in procession to the sea twice yearly. According to the Jewish writer Josephus, Hadad also enjoyed a major cult following at Damascus in the eighth and ninth centuries BC. By the third century BC the Hadad-Atargatis cult had extended to Egypt, when he becomes identified as the god SUTEKH. In the Greek tradition his consort becomes HERA.See also ADAD....
Goddess name
"Harpokrates [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS as a child. Generally depicted sitting on the knee of his mother, the goddess ISIS, often suckling at the left breast and wearing the juvenile side-lock of hair. He may also be invoked to ward off dangerous creatures and is åśśociated with crocodiles, snakes and scorpions. He is generally representative of the notion of a god-child, completing the union of two deities. Also Har-pa-khered (Egyptian)....
Goddess name
"Hauhet"
Egypt Primordial goddess. One of the eight deities of the OGDOAD, representing chaos, she is coupled with the god HEH and appears in anthropomorphic form but with the head of a snake. The pair epitomize the concept of infinity. She is also depicted greeting the rising Sun in the guise of a baboon....
Deities name
"Imiut"
Egypt Minor chthonic god. One of the attendant deities of the necropolis, he is linked with ANUBIS, and in pre-dynastic times was represented by a skin hung on a pole....
Goddess name
"Inlti (sun)"
Inca / pre - Columbian South America / Peru, etc Sun god. His consort is the moon goddess MAMA-KILYA. Inti was depicted as a trinity in the sanctuaries in Cuzco, possibly in deference to the Christian Trinity. The Temple of the Sun is reported to have housed images, in gold, of all the sky gods in the Inca pantheon on more or less equal terms, since the Sun is regarded as one of many great celestial powers. Inti may also have been depicted as a face on a gold disc. The socalled “fields of the Sun” supported the Inca priesthood. The three Sun deities are Apo-Inti (lord Sun), Cori-Inti (son Sun) and Inti-Wawqi (sun brother). The Sun god(s) is perceived as the progenitor of the Inca rulers at Cuzco through two children—a son Manco Capac and his sister / consort Mama Ocllo Huaco. The Quechua Indians of the central Andes call the same deity Inti Huayna Capac and perceive him as part of a trinity with the Christian god and Christ....
Deities name
"Kabeiroi"
Greek Blacksmith gods. According to tradition the sons or grandsons of the blacksmith god HEPHAISTOS. The cult was centered particularly on Lemnos, where there was an Etruscan tradition until circa 500 BC, and at Thebes. The Kabeiroi are thought to derive from pre-Greek Asian fertility deities in Anatolia [Turkey]....
Deities name
"Kami-Musubi-No-Kami"
Japan Third creator being in the primordial a list of deities, this being was born alone in the cosmos and its presence remains hidden from humans Japan / Shinto
Deities name
"Kami-Musubi-No-Kami (divine producing wondrous deity)"
Shinto / Japan Creator being. The third in the list of primordial deities appearing in the Kojiki and Nibongi sacred texts. A remote and vaguely defined deity who was born alone in the cosmos and whose presence remains hidden from mankind. Probably influenced by Chinese religion....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.