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The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "son"
NameOriginDescription
Aabit Egypt Singing Goddess. Rules over music, song, voice, arts. Egypt
Abas Greek A son of Metaneira, was changed by Demeter into a lizard
Acastus Greek A son of Pelias, king of lolcus, and of Anaxibia, or as others call her, Philomache.
Acestes Roman A son of the Sicilian river-god Crimisus and of a Trojan woman of the name of Egesta or Segesta
Achaeus Greek A son of Xuthus and Creusa, and consequently a brother of Ion and grandson of Hellen. Greek
Acheron Greek Acheron a son of Helios and Gaea or Demeter, and was changed into the river bearing his name in the lower world, because he had refreshed the Titans with drink during their contest with Zeus.
Achilles Greek The son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidones in Phthiotis, in Thessaly, and of the Nereid Thetis.
Acis Greek According to Ovid (Metamorphoses I) a son of Faunus and Symaethis.
Acragas Greek A son of Zeus and the Oceanid Asterope
Acrisius Greek A mythical king of Argos, and a son of Abas and Ocalea (or Aglaea, depending on the author). He quarrelled constantly with his twin brother Proetus, inventing bucklers in the process, and in the end expelled him to Tiryns.
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Actaeon Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Actaeus Greek A son of Erisichthon, and the earliest king of Attica. He had three daughters, Agraulos, Herse, and Pandrosus, and was succeeded by Cecrops. Greek
Actor Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Adad Mesopotamia/Babylonn Son of Anu and the god of wind, storm, flood and rain. Giver of life in the fields. Mesopotamia/Babylonn
Adityas Hindu Divine sons of Aditi, Varuna Aditya, Indra, Mitra, Rudra, Tvashtar and Vishnu Hindu
Admetus Greek A son of Pheres, the founder and king of Pherae in Thessaly, and of Periclymene or Clymene. (Apollodorus i) He took part in the Calydonian chase and the expedition of the Argonauts. (Apollodorus i)
Adonis Assyria A son of Cinyras and Medarme, according to Hesiod a son of Phoenix and Alphesiboea, and according to the cyclic poet Panyasis, a son of Tlieias, king of Assyria, who begot him by his own daughter Smyrna. (Myrrha.)
Adoram Christian A seraph, who had charge of James the son of Alpheus. Christian
Adrastus Greek A son of Talaus, king of Argos, and of Lysimache. (Apollodorus i. 9.) Pausanias calls his mother Lysianassa, and Hygimis Eurynome.
Aeacus Greek A son of Zeus and Aegina, a daughter of the river-god Asopus.
Aed Celtic/Ireland Underworld god. Son of Lir and Aobh. Celtic/Ireland
Aeetes Greek Or Aeeta, a son of Helios and Perseis. (Theogony of Hesiod 957.)
Aegeus Greek According to some accounts a son of Pandion II. king of Athens, and of Pylia, while others call him a son of Scyrius or Phemius, and state that he was only an adopted son of Pandion.
Aegicores Greek A son of Ion, a king of Athens between the reigns of Erechtheus and Cecrops. Greek
Aegisthus Greek A son of Thyestes, who unwittingly begot him by his own daughter Pelopia. Immediately after his birth he was exposed, by his mother, but was found and saved by shepherds and suckled by a goat.
Aeneas Greek The son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and born on mount Ida. On his father's side he was a greatgrandson of Tros, and thus nearly related to the royal house of Troy, as Priam himself was a grandson of Tros. He was educated from his infancy at Dardanus, in the house of Alcathous, the husband of his sister.
Aepytus Greek One of the mythical kings of Arcadia. He was the son of Eilatus and originally ruled over Phaesana on the Alpheius in Arcadia. When Cleitor, the son of Azan, died without leaving any issue, Aepytus succeeded him and became king of the Arcadians, a part of whose country was called after him Aepytis.
Aesacus Greek A son of Priam and Arisbe, the daughter of Merops, from whom Aesacus learned the art of interpreting dreams.
Aeson Greek A son of Cretheus, the founder of lolcus, and of Tyro, the daughter of Salmoneus.
Aethalides Greek A son of Hermes and Eupolemeia, a daughter of Myrmidon. He was the herald of the Argonauts. Greek
Agamemnon Greek A son of Pleisthenes and grandson of Atreus, king of Mycenae, in whose house Agamemnon and Menelaus were educated after the death of their father. (Apollodorus. iii. ) Homer and several other writers call him a son of Atreus, grandson of Pelops, and great-grandson of Tantalus.
Agenor Libya A son of Poseidon and Libya, king of Phoenicia, and twin-brother of Belus. (Apollod. ii. 1. § 4.) He married Telephassa, by whom he became the father of Cadmus, Phoenix, Cylix, Thasus, Phineus, and according to some of Europa also. 2 3 4 5 6
Agnar Norse A son of King Hraudung and foster-son of Frigg. Norse
Aigipan Greek One of the rustic gods known as Panes, son of Aix and Zeus and a companion of Pan, with whom he is sometimes identified, and Dionysus.
Aja Surya Is the son of king Raghu, and thus a scion of the Ikshavaku dynasty, who claimed descent from the sun-God Surya. His paternal grandfather was the pious king Dileepa. King Aja's consort was the heavenly nymph Indumati; they were the parents of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, who was the father of Rama.
Ajax Greek A great Greek warrior, son of Telamon, king of Salamis, by Periboea or Eriboea and a grandson of Aeacus.
Akuti Hindu The daughter of Manu, who was given to Ruchi. Her twins, Yajсa and Dakshina, became husband and wife and had twelve sons, the deities called Yamas. Hindu
Al-A’war Jewish A son of Iblis, a jinn who encourages debauchery and jolly bonking. Jewish
Alabandus Greek A Carian hero, son of Euippus and Calirrhoe, whom the inhabitants of Alabanda worshipped as the founder of their town.
Albion Britain Son of a forgotten Sea God who may have been part of a lost creation myth. Was once said to rule the Celtic world. His name became the poetic name for Britain.
Albion the Giant Britain Fourth son of Neptune, sixth son of Osiris, and brother of Hercules, his mother being Amphitrita. Albion the Giant was put by his father in possession of the isle of Britain, where he speedily subdued the Samotheans, the first inhabitants. His brother Bergion ruled over Ireland and the Orkneys. Another of his brothers was Lestrigo, who subjected Italy.
Alcinous Greek A son of Nausithous, and grandson of Poseidon. His name is celebrated in the story of the Argonauts, and still more in that of the wanderings of Odysseus.
Alcippe Greek Daughter of Ares and Agraulos, the daughter of Cecrops. Halirrhothius, the son of Poseidon, intended to violate her, but was surprised by Ares, and killed, for which Poseidon bore a grudge against Ares. (Apollodorus iii.)
Alcmaeon Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Amphilochus, Eurydice, and Demonassa. (Apollodorus iii) His mother was induced by the necklace of Harmonia, which she received from Polyneices, to persuade her husband Amphiaraus to take part in the expedition against Thebes.
Aloeidae Greek Aloiadae, Aloadae, are patronymic forms from Aloeus, but are used to designate the two sons of his wife Iphimedeia by Poseidon: viz. Otus and Ephialtes.
Aloeos Greek Son of Poseidon Canace. Each of his two sons was 27 cubits high. Greek
Aloeus Greek 1. A son of Poseidon and Canace. He married Iphimedeia, the daughter of Triops, who was in love with Poseidon, and used to walk by the sea-side, take her hands full of its water, and sprinkle her bosom with it. The two sons whom she had by Poseidon were called Aloeidae. 2. A son of Helios by Circe or Antiope, who received from his father the sovereignty over the district of Asopia.
Alope Greek A daughter of Cercyon, who was beloved by Poseidon on account of her great beauty, and became by him the mother of a son, whom she exposed immediately after his birth.
Alpheus Greece Alpheus as man. Hunting in the forests of Greece, Alpheus saw Artemis and desired her. Alpheus as a river (present Alfeios River) and river-god, thus like most river-gods a son of Oceanus and Tethys.
Amaethon / Amathaon Celtic Amaethon aka Amathaon ‘great ploughman’, was a son of Don and an agricultural deity. Celtic
Amathes Greek A son of Heracles, from whom the town of Amathus in Cyprus was believed to have derived its name.
Ame-Waka-Hiko Japan/Shinto "Heaven prince young", the disloyal son of Ame no Kuni-dama who shot a pheasant with a heavenly deer-bow and heavenly feathered arrows. Taka-mi-musubi no Mikoto took up the arrow and flung it back down to earth. This arrow hit Ame-waka-hiko on the top of his breast and killed him. Japan/Shinto
Ami Neter Egypt A singing god who rules over winds and song. Egypt
Amphiaraus Greek A son of Oicles and Hypermnestra, the daughter of Thestius. On his father's side he was descended from the famous seer Melampus.
Amphictyon Greek A son of Deucalion and Pyrrha or according to others an autochthon, who after having married Cranae, the daughter of Cranaus, king of Attica, expelled his father-in-law from his kingdom and usurped his throne. He ruled for twelve years, and was then in turn expelled by Erichthomus.
Amphidamas Greek A son of Lycurgus and Cleophile, and father of Antimache, who married Eurystheus. (Apollodorus iii) According to Pausanias and Apollonius Rhodius (Argonautica) he was a son of Aleus, and consequently a brother of Lycurgus, Cepheus, and Auge, and took part in the expedition of the Argonauts.
Amphilochus Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Alcmaeon. (Apollodorus iii) When his father went against Thebes, Amphiloehus was, according to Pausanias, yet an infant, although ten years afterwards he is mentioned as one of the Epigoni, and according to some traditions assisted his brother in the murder of his mother.
Amphion Greek A son of Zeus and Antiope, the daughter of Nycteus of Thebes, and twin-brother of Zethus.
Amphitryon Greek Or Amphitruo a son of Alcaeus, king of Troezen, by Hipponome, the daughter of Menoeceus. Pausanias calls his mother Laonome.
Amurru Akkadian Or Martu are also names given in Akkadian and Sumerian texts to the god of the Amorite/Amurru people, often forming part of personal names. He is sometimes called Ilu Amurru. Sometimes described as a 'shepherd', and as a son of the sky-god Anu.
Amyclas Sparta A son of Lacedaemon and Sparta, and father of Hyacinthus by Diomede, the daughter of Lapithus. He was king of Laconia, and was regarded as the founder of the town of Amyclae.
Amycus Greek A son of Poseidon by Bithynis, or by the Bithyaiian nymph Melia. He was ruler of the country of the Bebryces, and when the Argonauts landed on the coast of his dominions, he challenged the bravest of them to a boxing match.
Amythaon Greek A son of Cretheus and Tyro and brother of Aeson and Pheres. He dwelt at Pylos in Messenia, and by Idomene became the father of Bias, Melampus, and Aeolia.
Anat Hebrew / Israel The goddess ‘Anat is never mentioned in Hebrew scriptures as a goddess, though her name is apparently preserved in the city names Beth Anath and Anathoth. Anathoth seems to be a plural form of the name, perhaps a shortening of bкt ‘anatфt 'House of the ‘Anats', either a reference to many shrines of the goddess or a plural of intensification. The ancient hero Shamgar son of ‘Anat is mentioned in Judges 3.31;5:6 which raises the idea that this hero may have been imagined as a demi-god, a mortal son of the goddess.
Ancaeus Greek 1. A son of the Arjadian Lycurgus and Creophile or Eurynome, and father of Agapenor. He was one of the Argonauts and partook in the Calydonian hunt in which he was killed by the boar. (Apollodorus i. 9.) 2. A son of Poseidon and Astypalaea or Alta, king of the Leleges in Samos, and husband of Samia, the daughter of the river-god Maeander, by whom he became the father of Perilaus, Enodos, Samos, Alitherses, and Parthenope.
Anchises Greek A son of Capys and Themis, the daughter of Ilus. His descent is traced by Aeneas, his son, from Zeus himself. (Apollodorus iii) Hyginus makes him a son of Assaracus and grandson of Capys.
Andhaka Hindu Son of Kasyapa and Diti, a demon with a thousand arms and heads, two thousand eyes and feet. Though he walked like a blind man he could see very well. Hindu
Andraemon Greek The husband of Gorge, the daughter of the Calydonian king Oeneus, and father of Thoas. When Diomedes delivered Oeneus, who had been imprisoned by the sons of Agrius, he gave the kingdom to Andraemon, since Oeneus was already too old.
Androgeus Greek A son of Minos and Pasiphae, or Crete, who is said to have conquered all his opponents in the games of the Panathenaea at Athens. Greek
Angus Gaelic A Gaelic god of amorous dalliance. A son of Dugda, his harp was so sweet that whoever heard must follow; his kisses became invisible love-whispering birds.
Anpao Celtic The god of death. Son of Mider and Fuamnach. Celtic
Antaeus Libya Son of Poseidon and Ge, a mighty giant and wrestler in Libya, whose strength was invincible so long as he remained in contact with his mother earth.
Anteros Greek (Anterфs) was the son of Ares and Aphrodite, given to his brother Eros, who was lonely, as a playmate. He is the personification of unrequited love and punisher of those who scorn love, and is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and butterfly wings. The term was also used for the love which arises in the beloved boy in a pederastic relationship.
Anteros Greek/Etruscan The son of Ares and Aphrodite in Greek mythology, given to his brother Eros, who was lonely, as a playmate. He is the personification of unrequited love and punisher of those who scorn love, and is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and butterfly wings. Greek/Etruscan
Anti-Christ / AntiChrist Christian Anti-Christ or the Man of Sin, expected by some to precede the second coming of Christ. St. John so calls every one who denies the incarnation of the eternal Son of God. Christian
Antimachus Greek A Trojan, who, when Menelaus and Odysseus came to Troy to ask for the surrender of Helen, advised his countrymen to put the ambassadors to death. It was Antimachus who principally insisted upon Helen not being restored to the Greeks. He had three sons, and when two of them, Peisander and Hippolochus, fell into the hands of Menelaus, they were both put to death.
Antiope Greece A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus, Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb.
Aon Greek A son of Poseidon, and an ancient Boeotian hero, from whom the Boeotian Aonians and the country of Boeotia (for Boeotia was anciently called Aonia) were believed to have derived their names.
Aphareus Greek A son of the Messenian king Perieres and Gorgophone, the daughter of Perseus. (Apollodorus i) His wife is called by Apollodorus (Apollodorus iii) Arene, and by others Polydora or Laocoossa. (Argonautica) Aphareus had three sons, Lynceus, Idas, and Peisus.
Apheidas Greek A son of Arcas by Leaneira, or according to others, by Meganeira, Chrysopeleia, or Erato.
Apis Greek A son of Phoroneus by the nymph Laodice, and brother of Niobe. He was king of Argos, established a tyrannical government and called Peloponnesus after his own name but he was killed in a conspiracy headed by Thelxion and Telchin. Greek
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Arcas Greek A son of Zeus by Callisto, a companion of Artemis.
Archangels Greek Carry Divine Decrees from God to humanity and are constantly in battle with the Son of Darkness.
Ardalus Greek A son of Hephaestus who was said to have invented the flute, and to have built a sanctuary of the Muses at Troeze who derived from him the surname Ardalides Ardaliotides
Ares Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.
Argades Greek A son of Ion, a king of Athens between the reigns of Erechtheus and Cecrops
Argalus Sparta The eldest son of Amyclas, and his successor in the throne of Sparta.
Argus Greek A beast and son of Arestor with a hundred eyes of which he could only close two at a time. He was placed by Juno to guard Io, whom Jupiter had changed into a heifer. But Mercury, who was sent to carry her off, managed to surprise and kill Argus whereupon Juno transfered his eyes to the tail of a peacock, her favourite bird. In Greek mythology, Argus was the name of the builder of the Argo, the ship that carried the hero Jason in his quest for the Golden Fleece.
Arishta Hindu A Daitya, and a son of Bali, who attacked Krishna in the form of a savage bull and was slain by him. Hindu
Aristaeus Greece An ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. He is described either as a son of Uranus and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius.
Arsinoe Grek A daughter of Phegeus, and wife of Alcmaeon. As she disapproved of the murder of Alcmaeon, the sons of Phegeus put her into a chest and carried her to Tegea, where they accused her of having killed Alcmaeon herself.
Asase Ya Ghana The earth goddess of fertility in the mythology of the Ashanti people of Ghana. She is the wife of Nyame the sky god. In Ashanti mythology she gave birth to two sons, Bia and Tano. Ghana
Ascanius Greek A son of Aeneas by Creusa or by Lavinia. Greek
Ashvins Hindu Sons of the sun. Hindu
Asopus Greek The god of the river Asopus, was a son of Oceanus and Tethys, or according to others, of Poseidon and Pero, of Zeus and Eurynome, or lastly of Poseidon and Cegluse.
Assaracus Greek A son of Tros and Calirrhoe, the daughter of Scamander. He was king of Troy, and husband of Hieromneme, by whom he became the father of Capys, the father of Anchises.
Asterion Crete Or Asterius, 1. A son of Teutamus, and king of the Cretans, who married Europa after she had been carried to Crete by Zeus. He also brought up the three sons, Minos, Sarpedon, and Rhadamanthys whom she had by the father of the gods. (Apollodorus i) 2. A son of Cometes, Pyremus, or Priscus, by Antigone, the daughter of Pheres. He is mentioned as one of the Argonauts. (Argonautica) There are two more mythical personages of this name, one a river-god [Acraea], and the second a son of Minos, who was slain by Theseus.
Asterodeia Greek The Naiad Nymph of a gold-carrying stream of the Kaukasos Mountains. She was loved by Aeetes of Colchis, bearing him a son Apsyrtos. Greek
Astraeus Greek A Titan and son of Crius and Eurybia. By Eos he became the father of the winds Zephyrus, Boreas, and Notus, Eosphorus (the morning star), and all the stars of heaven. (Theogony 376) Ovid ( Metamorphoses xiv) calls the winds fratres Astraei, which does not mean that they were brothers of Astraeus, but brothers through Astraeus, their common father.
Asvins Hindu/Vedic Divine twin horsemen in the Rigveda, sons of Saranya, a goddess of the clouds and wife of either Surya in his form as Vivasvat. Hindu/Vedic
Ataokoloinona Madagascar (What-A-Strange-Thing} son of Ndriananahary, the creator god, who was sent to Earth to look in to everything and to advise on the possibility of creating living beings. He never appeared again. Madagascar
Athamas Greek A son of Aeolus and Enarete, the daughter of Deimachus. He was thus a brother of Cretheus, Sisyphus, Salmoneus, etc. (Apollodorus i)
Atlas Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony 507), a son of Japetus and Clymene, and a brother of Menoetius, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. According to Apollodorus his mother's name was Asia and, according to Hyginus, he was a son of Aether and Gaia.
Atli Icelandic  In the Volsunga Saga Atli is a king corresponding to Etzel in the Nibelungenlied; he marries Gudrun and invites her brothers to court, where they are treacherously slain. Gudrun avenges them by killing her own and Atli’s two sons, and later, Atli himself.
Auge Greek Princess of Arkadia and a priestess of Athena, who birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of the goddess. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery. Greek
Augeas Greek A son of Phorbas and Hermione, and king of the Epeians in Elis. According to some accounts he was a son of Eleios or Helios or Poseidon.
Autolycus Greek A son of Hermes or Daedalion by Chione, Philonis, or Telauge. He was the husband of Neaera, or according to Homer, of Amphithea, by whom he became the father of Anticleia, the mother of Odysseus and Aesimus.
Autonoe Greek A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, was the wife of Aristaeus, by whom she became the mother of Polydorus. (Theogony of Hesiod) According to Apollodorus (Apollodorus iii), Polydorus was a brother of Autonoe, and Actaeon was her son.
Azan Greece A son of Ares and the nymph Erato, was the brother of Apheidas and Elatus, and father of Cleitor. The part of Arcadia which he received from his father was called, after him, Azania. After his death, funeral games, which were believed to have been the first in Greece, were celebrated in his honour.
Azeus Greek A son of Clymenus of Orchomenos, father of Actor and grandfather of Astyoche. He went with his brothers against Thebes, to take vengeance for the murder of his father, who had been slain by the Thebans at a festival of the Onchestian Poseidon. Greek
Baiamai Australia He is considered by some to be the creator. Others believe he created his son, Burambin, who then created the world. Australia
Balder aka Baldr Norse Baldaer. God of the summer-sunlight. He was son of Odin and Frigg; slain by Hoder, at the instigation of Loke. He returns after Ragnarok. His dwelling is Breidablik. Norse
Balius and Xanthus Greek The immortal horses of Achilles. They were sons of Zephyrus and the Harpy Podarge.
Bana Daitya "He of a thousand arms". The eldest son of Bali. Daitya
Barbatos Greek A great count and duke, who appears when the sun is in Sagittarius with four noble kings and three companies of troops; he gives instructions in all the sciences, reveals treasures concealed by enchantment, knows the past and future, reconciles friends and those in power, and is of the Order of the Virtues. He also understands the songs of birds and the language of other animals. Unk
Barbeliots Greek A sect of Gnostics. Their first immortal son they called Barbeloth, omniscient, eternal, and incorruptible. He engendered light by the instrumentality of Christ, author of Wisdom. From Wisdom sprang Autogenes, and from Autogenes, Adam (male and female), and from Adam, matter. The first angel created was the Holy Ghost, from whom sprang the first prince, named Protarchontes, who married Arrogance, whose offspring was Sin. Burnt by the Christians
Bargasus Greek A son of Heracles and Barge, from whom the town of Bargasa in Caria derived its name. Greek
Bayard France A horse of incredible swiftness, belonging to the four sons of Aymon. If only one of the sons mounted, the horse was of the ordinary size; but if all four mounted, his body became elongated to the requisite length. The name is used for any valuable or wonderful horse, and means a "high-bay". France
Bellerophones Greek Or Bellerophon, properly called Hipponous, was a son of the Corinthian king Glaucus and Eurymede, and a grandson of Sisyphus. According to Hyginus, he was a son of Poseidon and Eurymede. Greek
Belus Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Benthesicyme Greek An Ethiopian sea nymph, a goddess of the waves and a daughter of Poseidon and Amphitrite, the wife of king Enalos. She raised Eumolpus, son of Chione and Poseidon. (Apollodorus iii) Her husband Enalos: of the sea, may have been Triton, the god of lake Tritonis in Greek
Bergelmir aka Bergelmer Scandinavian A frost-giant, father of the Jotuns, or second dynasty of giants, son of Thrudgelmer and grandson of Aurgelmer. Scandinavian
Bhima Buddhist A heroic warrior, son of Kunti by Vayu, but the acknowledged son of Pandu and the second eldest of the Pandava brothers Buddhist
Bhrkuti-Tara Buddhist/Tibet The Nepalese queen of Tibet's first great religious king, Songtsen Gambo and credited with the introduction of Buddhism to Tibet and China. In the Lamaeist Tradition, Bhrkuti-Tara is incarnate in all good women. Buddhist/Tibet
Bias Greek Son of Amythaon, and brother of the seer Melampus. He married Pero, daughter of Neleus, whom her father had refused to give to any one unless he brought him the oxen of Iphiclus. Greek
Biston Greek A son of Ares. Bistonians The Thracians; so called from Biston, son of Mars, who built Bistonia on the Lake Bistonis. Greek
Boeotus Greek A son of Poseidon or Itonus and Arne (Antiope or Melanippe), and brother of Aeolus. He was the ancestral hero of the Boeotians, who derived their name from him. Greek
Boon-givers India Favourers, finders of light, and Heaven, with gracious love accept my songs, my prayer, my hymn. The Rig-Veda
Boreas Greek Bopeas, or Bopas), the North wind, was, according to Hesiod (Theogony 379), a son of Astraeus and Eos, and brother of Hesperus, Zephyrus, and Notus. He dwelt in a cave of mount Haemus in Thrace. Greek
Bormus Greek A son of Upius, abducted by nymphs. Greek
Borr / Bor Norse Borr aka Bor [burr, a son; Scotch bairn]. A son of Bure and father of Odin, Vile and Ve. Norse
Bragi aka Brage Norse The god of poetry. A son of Odin. He is the best of skalds. Norse
Briareus Greek Also called Aegaeon, a son of Uranus by Gaea. Aegaeon and his brothers Gyges and Cottus are known under the name of the Uranids (Theogony of Hesiod 502), and are described as huge monsters with a hundred arms and fifty heads. (Apollodorus i. Theogony of Hesiod 149) Greek
Bucolion Greek A son of Laomedon and the nymph Calybe, who had several sons by Abarbarea
Bulis Greek Bulis metamorphosed into a drake; and his son, Egypios, into a vulture. Greek
Bunjil Australia Supreme god, represented as an eagle. The Kulin claim he is a culture-hero who taught them all the important skills of life, but the Wurundjeri claims he created mankind. He now lives in the sky. Binbeal, the rainbow spirit, is his son. Australia
Bunus Greek The son of Hermes and Alcidameia
Buphagus Pausanias Greek Buphagus Pausanias tells us that the son of Japhet was called Buphagos (glutton), as Hercules was called Adephagus, because on one occasion he ate a whole ox. Greek
Butes Greek Son of Boreas, a Thracian, was hostile towards his step-brother Lycurgus, and therefore compelled by his father to emigrate. He accordingly went with a band of colonists to the island of Strongyle, afterwards called Naxos. But as he and his companions had no women, they made predatory excursions, and also came to Thessaly, where they carried off the women who were just celebrating a festival of Dionysus. Butes himself took Coronis; but she invoked Dionysus, who struck Butes with madness, so that he threw himself into a well. Greek
Byzas Greek A son of Poseidon and Ceroessa, the daughter of Zeus and Io. He was believed to be the founder of Byzantium. Greek
C?os Greek Son of Heaven and Earth. He married Ph?be, and was the father of Latona. Greek
Cadmilus Greek According to Acusilaus a son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and father of the Samothracian Cabeiri and the Cabeirian nymphs. Others consider Cadmilus himself as the fourth of the Samothracian Cabeiri. Greek
Cadmus Greek A son of Agenor and Telephassa, and brother of Europa, Phoenix, and Cilix. When Europa was carried off by Zeus to Crete, Agenor sent out his sons in search of their sister, enjoining them not to return without her. Telephassa accompanied her sons. All researches being fruitless, Cadmus and Telephassa settled in Thrace. Here Telephassa died, and Cadmus, after burying her, went to Delphi to consult the oracle respecting his sister. Greek
Caicus Greek Two mythical personages, one a son of Oceanus and Tethys (Theogony of Hesiod 343), and the other a son of Hermes and Ocyrrhoe, who threw himself into the river Astraeus, henceforth called Caicus. Greek
Calydon Greek A son of Aetolus and Pronoe, married to Aeolia, by whom he became the father of Epicaste and Protogeneia. He was regarded as the founder of the Aetolian town of Calydon. Greek
Candybus Greek A son of Deucalion, from whom Candyba, a town in Lycia, was believed to have received its name. Greek
Canethus Greek Canethus two mythical personages, one a son of Lycaon, and the second the son of Atlas and father of Canthus in Euboea, from whom a mountain in Euboea near Chalcis derived its name.
Catillus Greek There are two Catilli in Roman legend: Catillus the Arcadian, son of Amphiaraus. Catillus, his son. Catillus the Arcadian and his sons Catillus, Tiburtus and Coras escaped the slaughter at Thebes and arrived at the Aniene Plateau. They drove away the Sicilians who lived there and founded a city named Tibur (now Tivoli) in honour of Tiburtius. Greek
Cebren Greek A Greek river-god (an Oceanid), whose river was located near Troy. He was the son of Oceanus and Tethys and he was the father of Asterope, Hesperia, who are sometimes considered to be each other, and Oenone. The city Cebrene (also spelled Kebrene or Kevrin) was named for Cebren. Greek
Celedones Greek The soothing goddesses were believed to be endowed, like the Sirens, with a magic power of song. Hephaestus was said to have made their golden images on the ceiling of the temple at Delphi. Greek
Cephissus Greek The divinity of the river Cephissus, is described as a son of Pontus and Thalassa, and the father of Diogeneia and Narcissus, who is therefore called Cephisius. Greek
Cercyon Greek A son of Poseidon by a daughter of Amphictyon, and accordingly a half-brother of Triptolemus. Others call him a son of Hephaestus. He came from Arcadia, and dwelt at Eleusis in Attica. Greek
Chaeron Greek A son of Apollo and Thero, the daughter of Phylas, is the mythical founder of Chaeroneia in Boeotia. Greek
Charon Greek A son of Erebos, the aged and dirty ferryman in the lower world, who conveyed in his boat the shades of the dead - though only of those whose bodies were buried across the rivers of the lower world. Greek
Chrysaor Greek 1. A son of Poseidon and Medusa, and consequently a brother of Pegasus. When Perseus cut off the head of Medusa, Chrysaor and Pegasus sprang forth from it. Chrysaor became by Callirrhoe the father of the three-headed Geryones and Echidna. ( Theogony of Hesiod 280) 2. The god with the golden sword or arms. In this sense it is used as a surname or attribute of several divinities, such as Apollo, Artemis and Demeter. We find Chrysaoreus as a surname of Zeus with the same meaning, under which he had a temple in Caria, which was a national sanctuary, and the place of meeting for the national assembly of the Carians. Greek
Chrysothemis Greek There are four mythical females of this name, and one male, a son of Carmanor, the priest of Apollo at Tarrha in Crete. He is said to have been a poet, and to have won the first victory in the Pythian games by a hymn on Apollo. Greek
Chunsu Egypt The son of Amon-Ra, a moon-god and god of healing. He formed one of the Triad with Mut and Amon-Ra. Egypt
Cinyras Greek A famous Cyprian hero. According to the common tradition, he was a son of Apollo by Paphos, king of Cyprus, and priest of the Paphian Aphrodite, which latter office remained hereditary in his family, the Cinyradae. Greek
Cleolla Greek According to Hesiod, Catalogues of Women, Pleisthenes was a son of Atreus and Aerope, and Agamemnon, Menelaus and Anaxibia were the children of Pleisthenes by Cleolla the daughter of Dias. Greek
Clytius Greek 1. A son of Laomedon and father of Caletor and Procleia, was one of the Trojan elders. 2. A son of the Oechalian king Eurytus, was one of the Argonauts, and was killed during the expedition by Heracles, or according to others by Aeetes. Greek
Coeus Greek Was the Titan of intelligence. Titans are the giant sons and daughters of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth). Greek
Coon Greek A son of Antenor and brother of Iphidamas, who wounded Agamemnon, but was afterwards slain by him. Greek
Coronus Greek 1. A son of Apollo by Chrysorthe, father of Corax and Lamedon, and king of Sicyon. 2. A son of Thersander, grandson of Sisyphus, and founder of Coroneia. 3. A son of Caeneus, was a prince of the Lapithae, and father of Leonteus and Lyside. He was slain by Heracles. (Apollodorus. ii) 4. The father of the Argonaut Caeneus. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) Greek
Corythus Greek 1. An Italian hero, a son of Jupiter, and husband of Electra, the daughter of Atlas, by whom he became the father of Jasius and Dardanus. He is described as king of Tuscia, and as the founder of Corythus. 2. A son of Paris and Oenone. He loved Helena and was beloved by her, and was therefore killed by his own father. Greek
Cratos Greek The personification of strength, described as a son of Uranus and Ge. Greek
Credne aka Creidhne Ireland A son of Brigid and Tuireann and the artificer of the Tuatha De Danann, working in bronze, brass and gold. He and his brothers Goibniu and Luchtaine were known as the Tri Dee Dana, the three gods of art, who forged the weapons which the Tuatha De used to battle the Fomorians. Ireland
Creon Greek A mythical king of Corinth, a son of Lycaethus. Greek
Cretheus Greek A son of Aeolus and Enarete, was married to Tyro, the daughter of Salmoneus, by whom he became the father of Aeson, Pheres, Amythaon, and Hippolyte. He is called the founder of the town of lolcus. Greek
Crimisus Greek A son of Oceanus and Tethys. According to Virgil's Aeneid* (5.38) and Hyginus' Fabulae (273), Crinisus was the father of Acestes by Segesta (Egesta). Greek
Crius Greek Or Creius, a son of Uranus and Gaia, and one of the Titans, who was the father of Astraeus, Pallas, and Perses. (The Theogony of Hesiod) Greek
Cromus Greek A son of Poseidon, from whom Cromyon in the territory of Corinth was believed to have derived its name. Greek
Cronides or Cronion Greek A patronymic from Cronus, and very commonly given to Zeus, the son of Cronus. Greek
Cronius Greek The name of two mythical personages, the one a son of Zeus by the nymph Himalia, and the other a suitor of Hippodameia, who was killed by Oenomaus.
Cronus Greek A son of Uranus and Ge, and the youngest among the Titans. He was married to Rhea, by whom he became the father of Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus. Cheiron is also called a son of Cronus. Greek
Cyanippus a Greek Cyanippus a son of Aegialeus and prince of Argos. Apollodorus calls him a brother of Aegialeus and a son of Adrastus. Greek
Cychreus or Cenchereus Greek A son of Poseidon and Salamis, became king of the island of Salamis, which was called after him Cychreia, and which he delivered from a dragon. Greek
Cyclopes Greek Cyclopes According to the ancient cosmogonies, the Cyclopes were the sons of Uranus and Ge; they belonged to the Titans, and were three in number, whose names were Arges, Steropes, and Brontes, and each of them had only one eye on his forehead. Together with the other Titans, they were cast by their father into Tartarus, but, instigated by their mother, they assisted Cronus in usurping the government.
Cycnus Greek A son of Apollo by Thyria or Hyria, the daughter of Amphinomus. He was a handsome hunter, living in the district between Pleuron and Calydon, and although beloved by many, repulsed all his lovers. Greek
Cymochles British A man of prodigious might, brother of Pyrochles, son of Malice (Acrates) and Despite, and husband of Acrasia, the enchantress. He sets out to encounter Sir Guyen, but is ferried over the idle lake by Wantonness (Ph?'dria), and forgets himself; he is slain by King Arthur. British
Cynortes Greek Or Cynortas, a son of Amyclas by Diomede, and brother of Hyacinthus. After the death of his brother Argalus, he became king of Sparta and father of Oebalus or of Perieres. His tomb was shown at Sparta not far from the Scias. Greek
Cyparissus Greek A youth of Cea, a son of Telephus, was beloved by Apollo and Zephyrus or Silvanus. When he had inadvertently killed his favourite stag, he was seized with immoderate grief, and metamorphosed into a cypress. Greek
Cytus Greek A son of Zeus by the Rhodian nymph Himalia. Brother to Cronius, and Spartaeus.
Dagr Norse The god of the daytime, a son of Delling (god of twilight) and Nott. Dagr, the Bright and the Fair, drove across the sky in a chariot every day, pulled by a horse named Skinfaxi. Norse
Danaides Greek Daughters of Danaus. They were fifty in number, and married the fifty sons of ?gyptos. They all but one murdered their husbands on their wedding-night, and were punished in the infernal regions by having to draw water everlastingly in sieves from a deep well.
Danaus Greek A son of Belus and Anchinoe, and a grandson of Poseidon and Libya. He was brother of Aegyptus, and father of fifty daughters, and the mythical ancestor of the Danai. (Apollodorus. ii.) Greek
Daphnis Greek A Sicilian hero, to whom the invention of bucolic poetry is ascribed. He is called a son of Hermes by a nymph, or merely the beloved of Hermes. Ovid calls him an Idaean shepherd; but it does not follow from this that Ovid connected him with either the Phrygian or the Cretan Ida, since Ida signifies any woody mountain. Greek
Dardanus Greek A son of Zeus and Electra, the daughter of Atlas. He was the brother of Jasus, Jasius, Jason, or Jasion, Aetion and Harmonia, and his native place in the various traditions is Arcadia, Crete, Troas, or Italy. Dardanus is the mythical ancestor of the Trojans, and through them of the Romans. It is necessary to distinguish between the earlier Greek legends and the later ones which we meet with in the poetry of Italy. Greek
Daronwy Wales This god appears only in the songs/ book of Taleisin
Dasim Arabic A son of Iblis, a jinn, who causes hatred between husband and wife. Arabic
Daunus Greek A son of Pilumnus and Danae, was married to Venilia.
Deimas Greek A son of Dardanus and Chryse and brother of Idaeus, who when his family and a part of the Arcadian population emigrated, remained behind in Arcadia. Greek
Deion Greek A son of Aeolus and Enarete, was king in Phocis and husband of Diomede, by whom he became the father of Asteropeia, Aenetus, Actor, Phylacus, and Cephalus. After the death of his brother, Salmoneus, he took his daughter Tyro into his house, and gave her in marriage to Cretheus. His name occurs also in the form Deioneus. Greek
Deiphobus Greek 1. A son of Priam and Hecabe, was next to Hector the bravest among the Trojans. When Paris, yet unrecognized, came to his brothers, and conquered them all in the contest for his favourite bull, Deiphobus drew his sword against him, and Paris fled to the altar of Zeus Herceius.
Deiphontes Greek A son of Antimachus, and husband of Hyrnetho, the daughter of Temenus the Heracleide, by whom he became the father of Antimenes, Xanthippus, Argeius, and Orsobia.
Demi-Gods Greek The "half-gods", is used to describe mythological figures or heroes such as Hercules, Achilles, Castor and Pollux, etc. Sons of mortals and gods or goddesses, they raised themselves to the standard of gods by their acts of bravery.
Demophon Greek The youngest son of Celeus and Metaneira, who was entrusted to the care of Demeter. He grew up under her without any human food, being fed by the goddess with her own milk, and ambrosia. During the night she used to place him in fire to secure to him eternal youth ; but once she was observed by Metaneira, who disturbed, the goddess by her cries, and the child Demophon was consumed by the flames. Greek
Dendritis Greek The goddess of the tree, occurs as a surname of Helen at Rhodes, and the following story is related to account for it. After the death of Menelaus, Helen was driven from her home by two natural sons of her husband. She fled to Rhodes, and sought the protection of her friend Polyxo, the widow of Tlepolemus. But Polyxo bore Helen a grudge, since her own husband Tlepolemus had fallen a victim in the Trojan war. Accordingly, once while Helen was bathing, Polyxo sent out her servants in the disguise of the Erinnyes, with the command to hang Helen on a tree.
Dercynus Greek A son of Poseidon and brother of Albion. Greek
Deucalion Greek Son of Prometheus and Clymene. He was king in Phthia, and married to Pyrr. When Zeus, after the treatment he had received from Lycaon, had resolved to destroy the degenerate race of men who inhabited the earth, Deucalion, on the advice of his father, built a ship, and carried into it stores of provisions and when Zeus sent a flood all over Hellas, which destroyed all its inhabitants, Deucalion and Pyrrha alone were saved. Greek